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Written in Fire
     

Written in Fire

4.6 5
by Marcus Sakey
 

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The explosive conclusion to the bestselling Brilliance Trilogy

For thirty years humanity struggled to cope with the brilliants, the one percent of people born with remarkable gifts. For thirty years we tried to avoid a devastating civil war.

We failed.

The White House is a smoking ruin. Madison Square Garden is an internment camp. In Wyoming, an armed

Overview

The explosive conclusion to the bestselling Brilliance Trilogy

For thirty years humanity struggled to cope with the brilliants, the one percent of people born with remarkable gifts. For thirty years we tried to avoid a devastating civil war.

We failed.

The White House is a smoking ruin. Madison Square Garden is an internment camp. In Wyoming, an armed militia of thousands marches toward a final, apocalyptic battle.

Nick Cooper has spent his life fighting for his children and his country. Now, as the world staggers on the edge of ruin, he must risk everything he loves to face his oldest enemy—a brilliant terrorist so driven by his ideals that he will sacrifice humanity’s future to achieve them.

From “one of our best storytellers” (Michael Connelly) comes the blistering conclusion to the acclaimed series that is a “forget-to-pick-up-milk, forget-to-water-the-plants, forget-to-eat total immersion experience” (Gillian Flynn).

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 11/02/2015
The searing conclusion to Sakey’s Brilliance trilogy (after Brilliance and A Better World) updates the plight of the supernaturally gifted people known as abnorms, who constitute 1% of the U.S. population and first appeared in 1986. Thirty years later, federal agent Nick Cooper, who’s an abnorm, realizes that the policy of fighting “monsters” (renegade abnorms) has turned government officials such as Secretary of Defense Owen Leahy into monsters themselves. With tragic results, Leahy has provoked conflict between the government and Tesla, the abnorms’ Wyoming enclave, while Cooper, battling desperately for his children’s future and torn between lingering affection for his ex-wife and his new abnorm partner, pursues evil abnorm genius John Smith, who’s bent on annihilating normal humans. Though the rapid-fire cinematic cuts may disorient readers unfamiliar with the earlier books, this installment raises important questions about such matters as patriotism, self-sacrifice, conflicting loyalties, and parental devotion. Agent: Scott Miller, Trident Media Group. (Jan.)
Kirkus Reviews
2015-10-08
The war over a generation with superpowers comes to a final showdown. Sakey (A Better World, 2014, etc.) brings his cinematic series to a ferocious close, capping off a three-book experiment in futuristic violence, societal catastrophe, and hyperkinetic storytelling. The world is at war. The White House has been destroyed, cities burned to the ground, and society is crumbling. In Wyoming, the small percentage of the population with extraordinary abilities retreats behind the walls of the Jerusalem-like city of Tesla. They hide behind the Vogler Ring, a wall of microwave weapons that threatens to fry invaders in gruesome fashion. But a new group of extremists called the New Sons of Liberty is determined to exterminate the Brilliants at Tesla. Meanwhile, a mad scientist named Abraham Couzen has discovered a method to turn normal people gifted. Since testing out his strange brew, Couzen has become a multifarious threat himself. Terrorist John Smith and his creepy time-aberrant henchman, Soren Johansen, are determined to weaponize Couzen's creation, forcing evolution upon the planet. "I realized when I was eight years old that [this] wasn't a world I could live in," Smith confesses. "I decided to tear it down and build a better one. To pen a new history, one written in fire." The two people standing between Smith and the end of the world are government agent Nick Cooper and his partner in heroics, Shannon Azzi, who must pit their own gifts against the world's villains one more time, even at terrible cost. That said, it's not all so grave. Locked in combat with one of Smith's deadly henchmen, Cooper has a nice Indiana Jones moment: "All you need to do is tie him up long enough for the others to—Wait a second. You're carrying an assault rifle." This entry isn't the best jumping-on point but serves as a thrilling reward for loyal readers and those willing to take the ride. A bombastic final entry that combines larger-than-life futurism with convincing ultraviolence to deliver a satisfying, open-ended finale.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781477827642
Publisher:
Amazon Publishing
Publication date:
01/12/2016
Series:
Brilliance Trilogy Series , #3
Sales rank:
148,252
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Marcus Sakey’s thrillers have been nominated for more than fifteen awards. They’ve been named New York Times Editors’ Choice picks and have been selected among Esquire’s top five books of the year. His novel Good People was made into a movie starring James Franco and Kate Hudson, and Brilliance is currently in development with Legendary Pictures. Sakey lives in Chicago with his wife and daughter.

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Written in Fire 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Ratbruce More than 1 year ago
Excellent finish to this excellent trilogy. Don't miss it.
Bobby Edwards More than 1 year ago
I bought this book as soon as it became available and immediately began reading. I did not put it down until the story had ended. I was not disappointed. The ending goes beyond satisfying. Highly recommend.
tpolen More than 1 year ago
While I didn't read the first book in this series, Brilliance, I started with the second, A Better World, a book I completely enjoyed, and was able to catch up, but I'd recommend starting at the beginning. It's been close to two years since I read the last book, and I have to admit, it took me several pages to remember some of the character details and their motivations, but the author works some reminders into the story, which allowed me to recall how much I like these characters. This is a super-charged, fast-paced book with little down time and you'll want to finish it in one sitting. Without giving away spoilers, something that happens with Nick's character near the end felt a little too neatly packaged and contrived, and didn't fit well with the story, but judging by other readers' reviews, it wasn't an issue for them. Although the 'heroes' of this trilogy are well-written and admirable, the author has created some truly memorable 'villains', as well as a complex, highly imaginative plot based on the premise that people fear what they don't understand. Sakey states this is the conclusion of the Brilliance Saga, but the ending leaves an opening to continue this series - something I wouldn't mind at all. I received a digital ARC of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
ToManyBooksNotEnoughTime More than 1 year ago
I would like to thank Thomas Mercer & NetGalley for an e-ARC of this book to review. Though I received this e-book for free, that has no impact upon the honesty of my review. Goodreads Teaser: The explosive conclusion to the bestselling Brilliance Trilogy For thirty years humanity struggled to cope with the brilliants, the 1 percent of people born with remarkable gifts. For thirty years we tried to avoid a devastating civil war. We failed. The White House is a smoking ruin. Madison Square Garden is an internment camp. In Wyoming, an armed militia of thousands marches toward a final, apocalyptic battle. Nick Cooper has spent his life fighting for his children and his country. Now, as the world staggers on the edge of ruin, he must risk everything he loves to face his oldest enemy—a brilliant terrorist so driven by his ideals that he will sacrifice humanity’s future to achieve them. As conclusions go this one is pretty close to epic for me. Given the amazing storyline presented and expanded in the first two books, the fact that Sakey was able to not only take everything one step further but also grab hold of all the separate lines in this story and wrap them up in a pretty tidy package is a feat that demands utmost respect. Once again it's the characters that really get to me. I was pleasantly surprised by the way almost all of the large and small complications between the characters are resolved, with none feeling forced or rushed. Yet in this final book the story and how close we could actually be to something like it are also powerfully addictive. The scope of these books is staggering, and while cloaked in a fictional reality, the parallels between this story and the world we readers occupy are frightening. I can easily envision something similar happening in the real world, and that's what makes this series so unbelievably powerful and engaging. The ending did not come as a surprise for me, but then I think it was deliberately designed that way. Or maybe it only seems like that to me because I tend to think like Nick Cooper? But it's more likely because I've read so many books that I notice the small cues, or in this case the less than subtle cue. And yet that had zero impact on my absolute enjoyment of this book and series as a whole. I know that the only thing that will knock my head out of Sakey's world will be to immerse myself in another compelling book, but I plan on lingering in this wonderful world a while longer. Thank you Mr. Sakey!
jayfwms More than 1 year ago
I downloaded this book as soon as it became available and immediately began reading. I did not put it down until the story had ended. I was not disappointed as my pulse rate soared and I hung on every word. The concept is highly imaginative, but the success of this book is in the depth of characters and the depiction of very human traits. The environment is realistic despite including elements beyond current science. The people are well-rounded and human. Even minor characters receive a detailed introduction. The ending goes beyond satisfying. This is truly one of the most-exciting books I have read in recent years.