Wu Ting Fang Chinese Minister at Washington D C

Wu Ting Fang Chinese Minister at Washington D C

by L. A. Coolidge
     
 

Originally published in 1902, contains lots of great information and illustrations seldom seen in the last 110 years.

Wu Ting-fang is the most extraordinary person who ever came to us out of the East. He is one of the individuals—rare in any country—whose intelligence is universal in its range. He is a man of the world in all that the phrase…  See more details below

Overview

Originally published in 1902, contains lots of great information and illustrations seldom seen in the last 110 years.

Wu Ting-fang is the most extraordinary person who ever came to us out of the East. He is one of the individuals—rare in any country—whose intelligence is universal in its range. He is a man of the world in all that the phrase implies. There is no company of men or women among whom he would not be at home. His mind plays easily and swiftly. He is quick of apprehension and speedy in response. Sagacious, witty, astute, discerning and catholic in sympathy, his aim has been to learn the ways of the country and adapt himself to them. He is an untiring student of American literature and customs. He reads the newspapers religiously and has, an intimate acquaintance with the topics of the day. He is fond of travel and likes to meet all kinds of people. He sees everybody who calls to see him at the legation, no matter how unimportant the person or trifling the errand.

Physically, he is of medium height and of medium build, a trifle stouter, perhaps, than the average of his race, and clothed with muscles worthy of, an athlete. There are few women who would not envy him the perfect teeth, white, hard and small, which he displays as often as he smiles. He is graceful in his movements and carries himself always with a dignity that is enhanced by his flowing robes of silk. His manner of life to all outward appearance is that of any well-born American. There is hardly an oriental suggestion in the furnish¬ings of the handsome house in a fashionable quarter of the town, which he engaged for legation purposes when he first came to Washington. Madame Wu, whom he married twenty years ago in China, and who looks for all the world as if she had stepped out of a Chinese picture, pays calls and receives them as regularly as any other woman of her station. She attends the theatre with him and frequents public places. His eight year old boy plays with American youngsters and is getting an American education; he goes to the public schools and beats all the other children at their studies. The Minister has an automobile of the latest pattern which he delights in running at a perilous speed over the smooth asphalt streets of Washington. The boy has strict orders not to touch it, but he is a chip of the old block, with an experimental turn of mind. One day the machine was left unattended at the legation door; the youngster mounted it, set it going and ran it against a tree on the other side of the street.

The Minister and Madame Wu give several teas in the course of a season. The legation is always crowded on these occasions. Sometimes as many as a thousand people attend. "How many of these do you know?" a friend asked the Minister at one of the crushes.

"Not many," he replied, good-naturedly; "bat I like to have them come. It is the custom of the country."

Wu is surrounded by a group of young men who are as progressive in their ways as he, and who are equally in touch with American customs and habits of life. Most of them can speak English, and one of them, Mr. Chung Mun-yew, the secretary-interpreter, has as fine a mastery of the English idiom as the Minister himself and speaks the language without even the suspicion of an accent.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016156552
Publisher:
history-bytes
Publication date:
12/21/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
317 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >