Wumbers

Wumbers

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Tom Lichtenheld
     
 

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What do you get when you combine a word and a number? A wumber! Paying tribute to William Steig's CDB!, best-selling book, cre8ors Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld have wri10 and illustr8ed this s2pendous book that is 1derful 4 readers in kindergar10 and up. If we've confused you, just take a look at the book—4tun8ly it has helpful pictures. We are sure

Overview

What do you get when you combine a word and a number? A wumber! Paying tribute to William Steig's CDB!, best-selling book, cre8ors Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld have wri10 and illustr8ed this s2pendous book that is 1derful 4 readers in kindergar10 and up. If we've confused you, just take a look at the book—4tun8ly it has helpful pictures. We are sure you will get it ins10tly! Plus, this version includes audio and a read-along setting.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Acceler8 your thinking! Rosenthal and Lichtenheld, the team behind Duck! Rabbit! and others, continue their successful collaboration with a collection of word puns that substitute numbers for letters, text-message style (the book is dedicated to William Steig, “the cr8or of C D B!”). Throughout, characters have conversations that readers of all skill levels will delight in decoding. One spread imagines a tuba lesson: “Tigh10 your mouth... then 4ce out the air,” the teacher tells her student. Lichtenheld stands ready with a visual punch line: “2t!” the girl blasts, as her hair frizzes with the effort and the tuba vibrates alarmingly. Despite the goofy premise, Rosenthal takes her task seriously. The puns aren’t labored, and some are entertainingly complex. Kids will pick up new vocabulary (a spread of a diamond-adorned octopus is accompanied by the observation “Those sure are some orn8 10tacles”), and they’ll enjoy the cultural references (two kids comment on the bird inked on a bearded man’s bicep: “Cool! Look at his 2can ta2!”). Don’t worry about reading aloud: wumbers are easy to decode if you pay a10tion. Ages 4–up. Agent: Amy Rennert, the Amy Rennert Agency. (July)
From the Publisher
"A great way to think about the sounds our words make - with a fun twist!" - SavvyAuntie.com

"Wumbers takes the concept behind text-messaging shorthand and repurposes it into an interactive read-aloud that both kids and grown-ups can enjoy." - School Library Journal

"This book can be the center of family fun" - Chicago Tribune

"Pure fun, from 1 to 80, this book by the creators of Duck! Rabbit! once again makes us see things differently... will launch as many imaginations as the wumber of young people who read this book " - Shelf Awareness for Readers

"Playful!" - The Wall Street Journal

"In short, it's simply 1derful." - Daily Candy Kids

"Clever" - Kirkus Reviews

"Characters have conversations that readers of all skill levels will delight in decoding. " - Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
This book will get you thinking and giggling. What, you might ask, is a "wumber?" It's a word wri10, excuse me—written—with letters and numbers. Like the texting shorthand C U L8R. Though it might make Dunne shudder in his grave, Shakespeare probably would have a blast with it. The words will tickle the reader's brain cells and make her try to come up with words using the number 3, for instance. Oak 3? Not quite. The illustrations are cute and the sentences are just challenging enough. 2na salad, anyone? Then a game of 10nis? The use of the number 5 in survive was a tiny bit of a stretch, but understandable. And the parenthetical sentence about children doing things 4 a10tion takes the reader out of a kid's point of view. But the use of the number 9 for "d9" it was very inventive—didn't get it? It's denying. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Rosenthal and Lichtenheld team up again to craft an inspired picture book that encourages cre8tive wordplay. Starting on the endpapers with questions in speech bubbles ("What do you think you'll be like as 18ager?") and continuing through a series of conversations in double-page vignettes, Rosenthal cleverly combines words and numbers ("wumbers") that challenge readers to use their number recognition and phonological skills. Once children grasp the "ba6," they will have a "s2pendous" time figuring out the captions. From a boy and girl enjoying their "10ts" to the smiling child who is "el8ed" because he lost his first "2th," Lichenheld's ink and pastel coloring-book-style drawings supply visual clues to decoding the text. Wumbers takes the concept behind text-messaging shorthand and repurposes it into an interactive read-aloud that both kids and grown-ups can enjoy.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT
Kirkus Reviews
For the unversed, a "wumber" is a word crea8ted using numbers. (Obviously!) Inspired by the master of wordplay himself, William Steig (C D B!, 1968, and C D C?, 1984), Rosenthal and Lichtenheld's carefully crafted wumbers certainly hold their own. The scope, ranging from simple and fun ("Would you like some honey 2 swee10 your tea?") to more difficult vocabulary ("4give me, 4 this is bel8ed, but it seems once again I have overinfla8ed") covers a wide range of readers. A true testament to phonological awareness--the ability to hear the smaller sounds that make up words--if ever there was one, the wumbers also encourage kids to slow down and think. If mumbling repeatedly out loud does not yield the answer right away, Lichtenheld's bright pen-and-pastel illustrations will help readers spell it out. In this day and age of text-message shorthand, some linguists may declare this book a disaster (Steig never had to contend with such moral panic), but fear not; the clever wumbers are more likely to intrigue and stimulate, not destroy a child's ability to spell. Let's just hope there are no h8trs. (Picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452116617
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
05/18/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
40
File size:
18 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A great way to think about the sounds our words make - with a fun twist!" - SavvyAuntie.com

"Wumbers takes the concept behind text-messaging shorthand and repurposes it into an interactive read-aloud that both kids and grown-ups can enjoy." - School Library Journal

"This book can be the center of family fun" - Chicago Tribune

"Pure fun, from 1 to 80, this book by the creators of Duck! Rabbit! once again makes us see things differently... will launch as many imaginations as the wumber of young people who read this book " - Shelf Awareness for Readers

"Playful!" - The Wall Street Journal

"In short, it's simply 1derful." - Daily Candy Kids

"Clever" - Kirkus Reviews

"Characters have conversations that readers of all skill levels will delight in decoding. " - Publishers Weekly

Meet the Author

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is a best-selling author, blogger, and filmmaker. She lives in Chicago. Say hello to her at Whoisamy.com.
Tom Lichtenheld is also a best-selling author and illustrator, and he also lives in the Chicago area. You can see all of Tom's books and more at Tomlichtenheld.com.

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