Wuthering Heights [NOOK Book]

Overview

Wuthering Heights is the only novel by Emily Brontë. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective; wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them and many around them.

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Wuthering Heights

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Overview

Wuthering Heights is the only novel by Emily Brontë. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective; wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them and many around them.

Now considered a classic of English literature, Wuthering Heights met with mixed reviews by critics when it first appeared, mainly because of the narrative's stark depiction of mental and physical cruelty.[1][2] Although Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre was generally considered the best of the Brontë sisters' works during most of the nineteenth century, many subsequent critics of Wuthering Heights argued that it was a superior achievement.[3] Wuthering Heights has also given rise to many adaptations and inspired works, including films, radio, television dramatisations, a musical by Bernard J. Taylor, a ballet, three operas (respectively by Bernard Herrmann, Carlisle Floyd, and Frédéric Chaslin), a role-playing game, and a song by Kate Bush.

Prologue (chapters 1 to 3): Mr. Lockwood, a rich man from the south, has rented Thrushcross Grange in the north of England for peace and recuperation. Soon after his arrival, he visits his landlord, Mr. Heathcliff, who lives in the remote moorland farmhouse called "Wuthering Heights". He finds the inhabitants of Wuthering Heights to be a strange group: Mr. Heathcliff appears a gentleman but his mannerisms suggest otherwise; a reserved mistress of the house is in her mid teens; and a young man appears to be one of the family, although he dresses and talks like a servant.

Being snowed in, Mr. Lockwood stays the night and is shown to an unused chamber, where he finds books and graffiti from a former inhabitant of the farmhouse named Catherine. When he falls asleep, he has a nightmare in which he sees Catherine as a ghost trying to enter through the window. He wakes and is unable to return to sleep. As soon as the sun rises, he is escorted back to Thrushcross Grange by Heathcliff. There, he asks his housekeeper, Ellen Dean, to tell him the story of the family from the Heights.

The Childhood of Heathcliff (chapters 4 to 17): Thirty years prior, the Earnshaw family lives at Wuthering Heights. The children of the family are the teenaged Hindley and his younger sister, Catherine. Mr. Earnshaw travels to Liverpool, where he finds a homeless gypsy boy whom he decides to adopt, naming him "Heathcliff". Hindley finds himself robbed of his father's affections and becomes bitterly jealous of Heathcliff. However, Catherine grows very attached to him. Soon, the two children spend hours on the moors together and hate every moment apart.

Because of the domestic discord caused by Hindley and Heathcliff's sibling rivalry, Hindley is eventually sent to college. However, he marries a woman named Frances and returns three years later, after Mr. Earnshaw dies. He becomes master of Wuthering Heights, and forces Heathcliff to become a servant instead of a member of the family.

Several months after Hindley's return, Heathcliff and Catherine travel to Thrushcross Grange to spy on the Linton family. However, they are spotted and try to escape. Catherine, having been caught by a dog, is brought inside the Grange to have injuries tended to while Heathcliff is sent home. Catherine eventually returns to Wuthering Heights as a changed woman, looking and acting as a lady. She laughs at Heathcliff's unkempt appearance. When the Lintons visit the next day, Heathcliff dresses up to impress her. It fails when Edgar, one of the Linton children, argues with him. Heathcliff is locked in the attic, where Catherine later tries to comfort him. He swears vengeance on Hindley.

In the summer of the next year, Frances gives birth to a son, Hareton, but she dies before the year is out. This leads Hindley to descend into a life of drunkenness and waste.

Two years later and Catherine has become close friends with Edgar, growing more distant from Heathcliff. One day in August, while Hindley is absent, Edgar comes to visit Catherine. She has an argument with Ellen, which then spreads to Edgar who tries to leave. Catherine stops him and, before long, they declare themselves lovers.

Later, Catherine talks with Ellen, explaining that Edgar had asked her to marry him and she had accepted. She says that she does not really love Edgar but Heathcliff. Unfortunately she could never marry Heathcliff because of his lack of status and education. She therefore plans to marry Edgar and use that position to help raise Heathcliff's standing. Unfortunately, Heathcliff had overheard the first part about not being able to marry him and runs away, disappearing without a trace.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013615984
  • Publisher: zuubooks.com
  • Publication date: 7/17/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 216
  • File size: 318 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1386 )
Rating Distribution

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(702)

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(294)

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(166)

2 Star

(77)

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(147)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1391 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    A good read

    I decided to read this book after I saw it mentioned several times throughout the 'Twilight Series' by Stephenie Meyer. In the book 'Eclipse', Bella compared herself to the character of Catherine and being that I had never read 'Wuthering Heights' I thought I would give it a go. I'll have to admit that it was hard to read at times because the language back then was so different yet beautiful as well. I could definitely see similarities between the love triangle that exists between Catherine, Heathcliff, and Edgar compared to that of Bella, Edward, and Jacob in 'Twilight'. I think it was a good story and I'm glad that I did read it because now I can go back through the 'Twilight' books and know what Bella means when she mentions the different characters from the story. Good stuff...

    51 out of 64 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2009

    One of the finest novels ever written

    To read this novel is to succumb to a world that is strange and beautiful and cruel and mesmerizing. It reads like a dream written in poetry. It is not an easy read, but it is well worth the effort it takes to understand its complex structure, psychologically nuanced characters, and rich language. It's reputation as a love story is misleading. It is a story of love in all of its complex manifestations but not the romantic love of pulp fiction. The love Bronte refers to is love that is ambivalent, sadistic, obsessive, and, literally, maddening. Wuthering Heights is a true work of art that deserves to be read and re-read.

    29 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2008

    Unexpectedly Amazing!

    I'm generally not interested in the 'classic' genre and I was expecting a really slow start to Wuthering Heights, because that is what I discovered with reading Jane Eyre (I do understand that they are written by two different authors but I had expected their literary styles to be similar because the sisters were so close to each other). When I read the book for school over the summer, I was delighted to find the story fast paced, interesting, and simple yet still powerful. The intense, complex, (and somewhat boring) conversations that took place in Jane Eyre are absent from Wuthering Heights. The deeper meaning in the story is instead found more within the characters' actions, and relationships with one another. I found the characters loveable and memorable, though some of them were a little twisted.

    14 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2008

    Wuthering Heights

    I actually got into this book by Stephanie Meyer's 'Twilight' series because they mentioned it a lot in those books. Im extrememly glad I did take the time to read this book though because it was fanominal. It's your classic love story, with a twist of evil you didn't think possible from one person [that person being Heathcliff]. The old english talk can get confusing, so it's definately one for the older readers. All and all, it's one of my all-time favorite books.

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2008

    Heathcliff

    All of my life, I had heard of the dark novel, Wuthering Heights. I had read reviews describing its complicated twists, evil characters, and intense plots. After years of putting it off, I bought it, not giving myself the chance to look back at the Classics section on my way out. I decided it was time. Cautiously opening the first page, I prepared myself. I prepared myself for a long, complicated, sometimes scary read. What I got was a hurricane of emotions that I believe every human being is capable of. Not only was it an absorbing, fascinating read, but it was a revelation. I realized for the first time in my life that every human has a dark side that he keeps hidden in the chambers of his heart. Yet what if we, the human race, were to let our emotions rule us? What if our passions were portrayed for all the world to see? I imagine that is what Emily Bronte had in mind when she first envisioned this novel, her soul masterpiece. She exposed the human race as it really is: Warm, Passionate, Tempestuous, Melancholy, and sometimes a bit Playful.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2007

    just don't get it!!

    In college, I was a literay snob and only read things written before the 20th century. I absolutley adore Pride and Prejudice, loved Jane Eyre, really enjoyed Tess of the D'Ubervilles. I have read 'Wuthering heights' 2.5 times- just hoping it would get better as I got older. It didn't. I abhor books with such despicable characters as Heathcliff and Cathy. The plot meandered. I really wanted to enjoy this book, b/c I loved the other Brote sister's books so much, but I could not recommend this book, at all.

    9 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    .Wuthering Heights.

    I am really passionate about Wuthering Heights. After reading it in 10th grade, it's been my favorite romance novel. It's so intensely intense. I actually don't have this version of the book, I have the Norton edition, but I really like this cover. To sum up Wuthering Heights in a sentence, it's a novel that tells the story of two people, Catherine and Heathcliff, who are fiercely, and almost violently, in love with each other but can't truly, physically be together until they are in the grave. It's simply phenomenal!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Drama of reality in fiction

    The only book Emily bronte has ever written was 'Wuthering Heights.' I had always been told that iw was a classic love story, but that generalization is terribly misleading. The book is the threshold of what is dramatic literature. From revenge to true love to fate, it is all in this book. The story is about Mr. Lockwook staying at the Heights. No one much cares for Heathcliff, except Earnshaw's daughter, catherine. They have a strong relationship which evolves to romance. the story takes a twist when Heathfcliff leaves the heights for years, only to come back finding his love betrothed. Enraging him, thus ssetting up the plot of Heathcliff's revenge. As the years go by, Heathcliff marries, has a sokn, who takes an intrest in none other than Catherine's daughter. The connection created only infuriates Heathcliff with more passion for vengence. The story continues with the spiteful actions heathcliff takes."It is no company at all when people know nothing and say nothing." (Ch. 8 pg. 68) this is when Caterine is telling Heathcliff that she is tired of his company; not seeking friendship in him. this adds to the drama of the book because both love eacch other immensly and in all honesty, can not tolerate separation. Bronte had the capability to take real life situiations and mold them into her novel. Often, we make decisions based on our mind and not our heart. 'Wuthering Heights' vices these actions through its dramatic contense.Bronte characterized her characters in a subjective way. Each one was an individual. "I don't want your help; she snapped, I can get them for myself." (Ch. 2 pg. 11) This passage comes from the youhng Catherine, the daughter of Catherine and her husband. She plays an antagonist for Heathcliff's revenge. She has a soft heart and cares for the sick, but she is strong and does things for herself. Wee meet Joseph, a small character, but important. He is crude and angry at the world. It makes us apprefciate Catherine and Heathcliff's relationship even if it is strained. The main character, Heathcliff, is diverse in his feelings. "I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat." (Ch. 6 pg. 48) Here, we are learning about when Heathcliff was trying to save Catherine from an attacking dog. He is compasionate and protective of her. This deep love for her only fuels his rage, later o0n, when she marrys another.Throughout the book, there was a twist in plot on every page. The question was constantly, "What now?!" The characterization and genre ofthe book was satisfying because I was able to observe reality in this novel. The ending was unexpected, but one that exemplifies brilliance.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 8, 2010

    Typos

    This is a great book, however, this version is sprinkled with typos. For example, every time there is an apostrophe followed by two "L"s, it comes out as an eleven. I.e., "We'll" becomes "We'11," etc. It's not exactly a deal breaker, given that it's a free copy. It does get a little taxing to try to figure out each typographical error.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A story that never ends!!

    i'v heard much about this book from many people,decided to finally read it. had a hard time keeping names straight and who's who. and who was the strory teller. once i finally caught on to how the book was written i enjoyed it the whole time. i didnt want to put it down. i cant believe how much drama was put into one book. i think i will read it again soon. it wont be a disapointment to anyone reading it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2010

    Horrible

    We read this book for book club, and it took everything I had to make it through this book. I do not see the fasination with it honestly. They were more like brother and sister then lovers, and if it was anything it was lust that is it! Heathcliff is a horrible person and to even want to root for him and catherine I don't see it. He is so abusive to other women is this what we want our daughters looking up to, I don't! I want her to have a true love and find the person of her dreams, but not one that abuses women to get there! Hate this book!!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 7, 2010

    Would Not Read Again

    Well. That was a downer. Big surprise, I know. Was that a love story? A warning? A testimony to cousins marrying? The story of Catherine and Healthcliff, and Heathcliff's revenge on her family. I don't understand why he's such a romantic character. Is it because any piece of humanity he may have had was destroyed by her and yet all he wanted was to be with her in death? Is that romantic? I thought he was a terrible, terrible man. The pages I enjoyed most were approximately the last twenty. I very much enjoyed Hareton and Catherine's relationship, but the rest made me sad and gloomy, which seems to be the predominate theme. I hated the way it was told. I was at first confused at who was speaking, because I thought it would be third-person telling the story or first-person through Cathy or Heathcliff. Yet it's this guy who was never in the 'important' part of the story. I felt so disconnected from Cathy and Heathcliff as the narrator heard it from the servant who knew them, and disliked the hero and heroine! I am a reader who despises when people are complete idiots. Mistakes happen, yes. But it's so frustrating when they act so stupid and rashly as these characters do! Even those who are emotional and passionate have SOME sort of common sense! I have no pity for the characters and could not relate to them at all, because they were so stupid and idiotic! I cannot agree with people who think it's a story of 'true love' and blah blah blah. Sorry, but if you were REALLY in love with somebody, you wouldn't have done anything that Cathy and Heathcliff did. This book is not a love story, it's a hate story.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 5, 2010

    love/hate

    I had a love/hate thing with this book. It's really weird but I want to read it again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2009

    Timeless

    Just what the doctor ordered !

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2007

    Disappointment

    i started reading this book cuz other ppl told me this was a good book. i started to get bored halfway thru the book but i kept on reading, thinking the book wuld get better soon. this book dragged alot and didnt really contain much excitement for me.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2007

    eh

    eh, so,so not the number one book but ain't that bad. on a scale of 1-10 on how good it is i would give it a three and on a scale of how bad it is i would give it a 7. i wouldn't recommend to people. dissapointing. waist of time. you should just read a GOOD book like fresh of the boat and so not the drama.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Fans

    Are you all fans of warrior books or what

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2014

    DashingFire

    Thanks floats out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Karma

    "Anyone know where bloodclan is?"

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    EnderNight ((Going to try my name this way!))

    She pads in. "Can i join?" ((Winterstar, is it you? Do you know Moonfur? Or Stormwing?))

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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