Wuthering Heights

( 1386 )

Overview

Classic novel of consuming passions, played out against the lonely moors of northern England, recounts the turbulent and tempestuous love story of Cathy and Heathcliff. A masterpiece of imaginative fiction, the story remains as poignant and compelling today as it was when first published in 1847.

In early nineteenth-century Yorkshire, the passionate attachment between a headstrong young girl and a foundling boy brought up by her father causes disaster for them and ...

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Wuthering Heights

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Overview

Classic novel of consuming passions, played out against the lonely moors of northern England, recounts the turbulent and tempestuous love story of Cathy and Heathcliff. A masterpiece of imaginative fiction, the story remains as poignant and compelling today as it was when first published in 1847.

In early nineteenth-century Yorkshire, the passionate attachment between a headstrong young girl and a foundling boy brought up by her father causes disaster for them and many others, even in the next generation. Includes explanatory notes throughout the text, an introduction discussing the author and the background of the story, and a study guide.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristina Cassidy
One of the greatest gothic romance novels of all time, Wuthering Heights is the story of a tortured and ultimately tragic romance between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff. The story is told in a series of flashbacks. Heathcliff is an orphan brought to Wuthering Heights by the kindly Mr. Earnshaw. Heathcliff's best friend as he grows up is Mr. Earnshaw's daughter, Catherine. Earnshaw's son, Hindley, hates Heathcliff and forces Heathcliff to work as a hired hand after his father's death. Catherine and Heathcliff fall in love, considering themselves two parts of one person, but Catherine chooses to marry a neighbor, Edgar Linton. Heathcliff is devastated at Catherine's betrayal and leaves. When he returns months later, he is wealthy and marries Edgar Linton's sister, Isabella. Heathcliff and Catherine fight bitterly over this development, but reconcile shortly before she dies in childbirth. Heathcliff spirals into madness, taking out his fury on the Earnshaws and Lintons, punishing even his and Catherine's children. This new edition of the classic novel includes a cover illustration and extra features designed to capitalize on the popularity of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight gothic romance series. The cover even proclaims Wuthering Heights "Bella and Edward's favorite book." The extras include a quiz, information about the traits of gothic romance, and trivia about Emily Bronte, as well as Facebook profiles and quizzes for Heathcliff and Catherine. Other classics given a similar treatment include Romeo and Juliet and Pride and Prejudice. Reviewer: Kristina Cassidy
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

This audio version of Emily Bronte's classic is narrated by Ann Flosnik. Initially, her narration makes it difficult to distinguish between characters, but as the tale progresses, her vocal characterizations become more dramatic and unique for each character, drawing listeners deeper and deeper into this dark and brooding love story. The first disk of the set also contains a PDF ebook of the full text of the novel which can be downloaded. Some students will want to read along with the narrated version, while others can use the ebook as a reference tool for class assignments. A nice addition to classic literature collections and a good way to enhance the English curriculum.-Anita Lawson, Otsego High School, Otsego, MI

Internet Book Watch
This abridged presentation of a classic brings to life Bronte's gothic romance and provides a powerful reading by Martin Shaw, whose voice perfectly captures this dark story of the moors. Those reluctant to read the full classic will find this audio version compelling and hard to quit listening to.
—Internet Book Watch
From the Publisher
"It is as if Emily Brontë could tear up all that we know human beings by, and fill these unrecognizable transparencies with such a gust of life that they transcend reality."
—Virginia Woolf
From Barnes & Noble
An intriguing tale of revenge in which the main characters are controlled by consuming passions. This novel was once considered such a risk by its publishers that Emily Bronte had to defray the cost of publication until a sufficient number of copies had been sold.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486292564
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 9/24/1996
  • Series: Dover Thrift Editions Series
  • Edition description: Dover Thrift Editions
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 110,926
  • Product dimensions: 5.28 (w) x 8.26 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Emily Bronte (1818-1848) was one of three 19th century novelists from the same English family. She wrote one extrordinary novel, Wuthering Heights, and several poems.
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Read an Excerpt

1801

I have just returned from a visit to my landlord--the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with. This is certainly a beautiful country! In all England I do not believe that I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed from the stir of society. A perfect misanthropist's heaven; and Mr. Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us. A capital fellow! He little imagined how my heart warmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows, as I rode up, and when his fingers sheltered themselves, with a jealous resolution, still further in his waistcoat, as I announced my name.

"Mr. Heathcliff?" I said.

A nod was the answer.

"Mr. Lockwood, your new tenant, sir. I do myself the honour of calling as soon as possible after my arrival, to express the hope that I have not inconvenienced you by my perseverance in soliciting the occupation of Thrushcross Grange: I heard yesterday you had had some thoughts--"

"Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir," he interrupted, wincing. "I should not allow any one to inconvenience me, if I could hinder it--walk in!"

The "walk in" was uttered with closed teeth, and expressed the sentiment, "Go to the deuce": even the gate over which he leant manifested no sympathizing movement to the words; and I think that circumstance determined me to accept the invitation: I felt interested in a man who seemed more exaggeratedly reserved than myself.

When he saw my horse's breast fairly pushing the barrier, he did put out his hand to unchain it, and then sullenly preceded me up the causeway, calling, as we entered thecourt--"Joseph, take Mr. Lockwood's horse; and bring up some wine."

"Here we have the whole establishment of domestics, I suppose," was the reflection suggested by this compound order. "No wonder the grass grows up between the flags, and cattle are the only hedge-cutters."

Joseph was an elderly, nay, an old man: very old, perhaps, though hale and sinewy. "The Lord help us!" he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine aid to digest his dinner, and his pious ejaculation had no reference to my unexpected advent.

Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff's dwelling. "Wuthering" being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather. Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun. Happily the architect had foresight to build it strong: the narrow windows are deeply set in the wall, and the corners defended with large jutting stones.

Before passing the threshold, I paused to admire a quantity of grotesque carving lavished over the front, and especially about the principal door; above which, among a wilderness of crumbling griffins and shameless little boys, I detected the date "1500," and the name "Hareton Earnshaw." I would have made a few comments, and requested a short history of the place from the surly owner; but his attitude at the door appeared to demand my speedy entrance, or complete departure, and I had no desire to aggravate his impatience previous to inspecting the penetralium.

One step brought us into the family sitting-room, without any introductory lobby or passage. They call it here "the house" pre-eminently. It includes kitchen and parlour, generally; but I believe at Wuthering Heights the kitchen is forced to retreat altogether into another quarter: at least I distinguished a chatter of tongues, and a clatter of culinary utensils, deep within; and I observed no signs of roasting, boiling, or baking, about the huge fireplace; nor any glitter of copper saucepans and tin cullenders on the walls. One end, indeed, reflected splendidly both light and heat from ranks of immense pewter dishes, interspersed with silver jugs and tankards, towering row after row, on a vast oak dresser, to the very roof. The latter had never been underdrawn: its entire anatomy lay bare to an inquiring eye, except where a frame of wood laden with oatcakes and clusters of legs of beef, mutton, and ham concealed it. Above the chimney were sundry villainous old guns and a couple of horse-pistols: and, by way of ornament, three gaudily painted canisters disposed along its ledge. The floor was of smooth, white stone; the chairs, high-backed, primitive structures, painted green: one or two heavy black ones lurking in the shade. In an arch under the dresser reposed a huge liver-coloured bitch pointer, surrounded by a swarm of squealing puppies; and other dogs haunted other recesses.

The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in knee-breeches and gaiters. Such an individual seated in his armchair, his mug of ale frothing on the round table before him, is to be seen in any circuit of five or six miles among these hills, if you go at the right time after dinner. But Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living. He is a dark-skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose. Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of underbred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling--to manifestations of mutual kindliness. He'll love and hate equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to be loved or hated again. No, I'm running on too fast: I bestow my own attributes over liberally on him. Mr. Heathcliff may have entirely dissimilar reasons for keeping his hand out of the way when he meets a would-be acquaintance, to those which actuate me. Let me hope my constitution is almost peculiar: my dear mother used to say I should never have a comfortable home; and only last summer I proved myself perfectly unworthy of one.
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Table of Contents

About the series
About this volume
Pt. 1 Wuthering heights : the complete text in cultural context
Introduction : biographical and historical contexts 3
The complete text (1847) 15
Cultural documents and illustrations 289
The regional context: Haworth, Yorkshire, and the Moors 292
The political context : the women's movement 295
The historical context : the Irish potato famine 302
Imperial and racial contexts : models for Heathcliff 316
The legal context : English inheritance laws 324
Pt. 2 Wuthering Heights : a case study in contemporary criticism
A critical history of Wuthering Heights 333
Psychoanalytic criticism and Wuthering Heights 348
What is psychoanalytic criticism? 348
Psychoanalytic criticism : a selected bibliography 359
The absent mother in Wuthering Heights 364
Marxist criticism and Wuthering Heights 379
What is Marxist criticism? 379
Marxist criticism : a selected bibliography 391
Myths of power : a Marxist study on Wuthering Heights 394
Cultural criticism and Wuthering Heights 411
What is cultural criticism? 411
Cultural criticism : a selected bibliography 424
Imperialist nostalgia and Wuthering Heights 430
Feminist criticism and Wuthering Heights 451
What is feminist criticism? 451
Feminist criticism : a selected bibliography 459
Changing the names : the two Catherines 468
Combining perspectives on Wuthering Heights 478
From "your father was emperor of China, and your mother an Indian queen" : reverse imperialism in Wuthering Heights 480
Glossary of critical and theoretical terms 503
About the contributors 530
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Foreword

1. To what extent do you think the setting of the novel contributes to, or informs, what takes place? Do you think the moors are a character in their own right? How do you interpret Bronte's view of nature and the landscape?

2. Discuss Emily Bronte's careful attention to a rigid timeline and the role of the novel as a sober historical document. How is this significant, particularly in light of the turbulent action within? What other contrasts within the novel strike you, and why? How are these contrasts important, and how do they play out in the novel?

3. Do you think the novel is a tale of redemption, despair, or both? Discuss the novel's meaning to you. Do you think the novel's moral content dictates one choice over the other?

4. Do you think Bronte succeeds in creating three-dimensional figures in
Heathcliff and Cathy, particularly given their larger-than-life metaphysical passion? Why or why not?

5. Discuss Bronte's use of twos: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange; two families, each with two children; two couples (Catherine and Edgar, and Heathcliff and Isabella); two narrators; the doubling-up of names. What is Bronte's intention here? Discuss.

6. How do Mr. Lockwood and Nelly Dean influence the story as narrators? Do you think they are completely reliable observers? What does Bronte want us to believe?

7. Discuss the role of women in Wuthering Heights. Is their depiction typical of Bronte's time, or not? Do you think Bronte's characterizations of women mark her as a pioneer ahead of her time or not?

8. Who or what does Heathcliff represent in the novel? Is he a force of evil or a victimof it? How important is the role of class in the novel, particularly as it relates to Heathcliff and his life?

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Reading Group Guide

1. To what extent do you think the setting of the novel contributes to, or informs, what takes place? Do you think the moors are a character in their own right? How do you interpret Bronte's view of nature and the landscape?

2. Discuss Emily Bronte's careful attention to a rigid timeline and the role of the novel as a sober historical document. How is this significant, particularly in light of the turbulent action within? What other contrasts within the novel strike you, and why? How are these contrasts important, and how do they play out in the novel?

3. Do you think the novel is a tale of redemption, despair, or both? Discuss the novel's meaning to you. Do you think the novel's moral content dictates one choice over the other?

4. Do you think Bronte succeeds in creating three-dimensional figures in
Heathcliff and Cathy, particularly given their larger-than-life metaphysical passion? Why or why not?

5. Discuss Bronte's use of twos: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange; two families, each with two children; two couples (Catherine and Edgar, and Heathcliff and Isabella); two narrators; the doubling-up of names. What is Bronte's intention here? Discuss.

6. How do Mr. Lockwood and Nelly Dean influence the story as narrators? Do you think they are completely reliable observers? What does Bronte want us to believe?

7. Discuss the role of women in Wuthering Heights. Is their depiction typical of Bronte's time, or not? Do you think Bronte's characterizations of women mark her as a pioneer ahead of her time or not?

8. Who or what does Heathcliff represent in the novel? Is he a force of evil or a victim of it?How important is the role of class in the novel, particularly as it relates to Heathcliff and his life?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1386 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(702)

4 Star

(294)

3 Star

(166)

2 Star

(77)

1 Star

(147)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1391 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    A good read

    I decided to read this book after I saw it mentioned several times throughout the 'Twilight Series' by Stephenie Meyer. In the book 'Eclipse', Bella compared herself to the character of Catherine and being that I had never read 'Wuthering Heights' I thought I would give it a go. I'll have to admit that it was hard to read at times because the language back then was so different yet beautiful as well. I could definitely see similarities between the love triangle that exists between Catherine, Heathcliff, and Edgar compared to that of Bella, Edward, and Jacob in 'Twilight'. I think it was a good story and I'm glad that I did read it because now I can go back through the 'Twilight' books and know what Bella means when she mentions the different characters from the story. Good stuff...

    51 out of 64 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2009

    One of the finest novels ever written

    To read this novel is to succumb to a world that is strange and beautiful and cruel and mesmerizing. It reads like a dream written in poetry. It is not an easy read, but it is well worth the effort it takes to understand its complex structure, psychologically nuanced characters, and rich language. It's reputation as a love story is misleading. It is a story of love in all of its complex manifestations but not the romantic love of pulp fiction. The love Bronte refers to is love that is ambivalent, sadistic, obsessive, and, literally, maddening. Wuthering Heights is a true work of art that deserves to be read and re-read.

    29 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2008

    Unexpectedly Amazing!

    I'm generally not interested in the 'classic' genre and I was expecting a really slow start to Wuthering Heights, because that is what I discovered with reading Jane Eyre (I do understand that they are written by two different authors but I had expected their literary styles to be similar because the sisters were so close to each other). When I read the book for school over the summer, I was delighted to find the story fast paced, interesting, and simple yet still powerful. The intense, complex, (and somewhat boring) conversations that took place in Jane Eyre are absent from Wuthering Heights. The deeper meaning in the story is instead found more within the characters' actions, and relationships with one another. I found the characters loveable and memorable, though some of them were a little twisted.

    14 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2008

    Wuthering Heights

    I actually got into this book by Stephanie Meyer's 'Twilight' series because they mentioned it a lot in those books. Im extrememly glad I did take the time to read this book though because it was fanominal. It's your classic love story, with a twist of evil you didn't think possible from one person [that person being Heathcliff]. The old english talk can get confusing, so it's definately one for the older readers. All and all, it's one of my all-time favorite books.

    13 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2008

    Heathcliff

    All of my life, I had heard of the dark novel, Wuthering Heights. I had read reviews describing its complicated twists, evil characters, and intense plots. After years of putting it off, I bought it, not giving myself the chance to look back at the Classics section on my way out. I decided it was time. Cautiously opening the first page, I prepared myself. I prepared myself for a long, complicated, sometimes scary read. What I got was a hurricane of emotions that I believe every human being is capable of. Not only was it an absorbing, fascinating read, but it was a revelation. I realized for the first time in my life that every human has a dark side that he keeps hidden in the chambers of his heart. Yet what if we, the human race, were to let our emotions rule us? What if our passions were portrayed for all the world to see? I imagine that is what Emily Bronte had in mind when she first envisioned this novel, her soul masterpiece. She exposed the human race as it really is: Warm, Passionate, Tempestuous, Melancholy, and sometimes a bit Playful.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2007

    just don't get it!!

    In college, I was a literay snob and only read things written before the 20th century. I absolutley adore Pride and Prejudice, loved Jane Eyre, really enjoyed Tess of the D'Ubervilles. I have read 'Wuthering heights' 2.5 times- just hoping it would get better as I got older. It didn't. I abhor books with such despicable characters as Heathcliff and Cathy. The plot meandered. I really wanted to enjoy this book, b/c I loved the other Brote sister's books so much, but I could not recommend this book, at all.

    9 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    .Wuthering Heights.

    I am really passionate about Wuthering Heights. After reading it in 10th grade, it's been my favorite romance novel. It's so intensely intense. I actually don't have this version of the book, I have the Norton edition, but I really like this cover. To sum up Wuthering Heights in a sentence, it's a novel that tells the story of two people, Catherine and Heathcliff, who are fiercely, and almost violently, in love with each other but can't truly, physically be together until they are in the grave. It's simply phenomenal!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Drama of reality in fiction

    The only book Emily bronte has ever written was 'Wuthering Heights.' I had always been told that iw was a classic love story, but that generalization is terribly misleading. The book is the threshold of what is dramatic literature. From revenge to true love to fate, it is all in this book. The story is about Mr. Lockwook staying at the Heights. No one much cares for Heathcliff, except Earnshaw's daughter, catherine. They have a strong relationship which evolves to romance. the story takes a twist when Heathfcliff leaves the heights for years, only to come back finding his love betrothed. Enraging him, thus ssetting up the plot of Heathcliff's revenge. As the years go by, Heathcliff marries, has a sokn, who takes an intrest in none other than Catherine's daughter. The connection created only infuriates Heathcliff with more passion for vengence. The story continues with the spiteful actions heathcliff takes."It is no company at all when people know nothing and say nothing." (Ch. 8 pg. 68) this is when Caterine is telling Heathcliff that she is tired of his company; not seeking friendship in him. this adds to the drama of the book because both love eacch other immensly and in all honesty, can not tolerate separation. Bronte had the capability to take real life situiations and mold them into her novel. Often, we make decisions based on our mind and not our heart. 'Wuthering Heights' vices these actions through its dramatic contense.Bronte characterized her characters in a subjective way. Each one was an individual. "I don't want your help; she snapped, I can get them for myself." (Ch. 2 pg. 11) This passage comes from the youhng Catherine, the daughter of Catherine and her husband. She plays an antagonist for Heathcliff's revenge. She has a soft heart and cares for the sick, but she is strong and does things for herself. Wee meet Joseph, a small character, but important. He is crude and angry at the world. It makes us apprefciate Catherine and Heathcliff's relationship even if it is strained. The main character, Heathcliff, is diverse in his feelings. "I got a stone and thrust it between his jaws and tried with all my might to cram it down his throat." (Ch. 6 pg. 48) Here, we are learning about when Heathcliff was trying to save Catherine from an attacking dog. He is compasionate and protective of her. This deep love for her only fuels his rage, later o0n, when she marrys another.Throughout the book, there was a twist in plot on every page. The question was constantly, "What now?!" The characterization and genre ofthe book was satisfying because I was able to observe reality in this novel. The ending was unexpected, but one that exemplifies brilliance.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 8, 2010

    Typos

    This is a great book, however, this version is sprinkled with typos. For example, every time there is an apostrophe followed by two "L"s, it comes out as an eleven. I.e., "We'll" becomes "We'11," etc. It's not exactly a deal breaker, given that it's a free copy. It does get a little taxing to try to figure out each typographical error.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A story that never ends!!

    i'v heard much about this book from many people,decided to finally read it. had a hard time keeping names straight and who's who. and who was the strory teller. once i finally caught on to how the book was written i enjoyed it the whole time. i didnt want to put it down. i cant believe how much drama was put into one book. i think i will read it again soon. it wont be a disapointment to anyone reading it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2010

    Horrible

    We read this book for book club, and it took everything I had to make it through this book. I do not see the fasination with it honestly. They were more like brother and sister then lovers, and if it was anything it was lust that is it! Heathcliff is a horrible person and to even want to root for him and catherine I don't see it. He is so abusive to other women is this what we want our daughters looking up to, I don't! I want her to have a true love and find the person of her dreams, but not one that abuses women to get there! Hate this book!!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 7, 2010

    Would Not Read Again

    Well. That was a downer. Big surprise, I know. Was that a love story? A warning? A testimony to cousins marrying? The story of Catherine and Healthcliff, and Heathcliff's revenge on her family. I don't understand why he's such a romantic character. Is it because any piece of humanity he may have had was destroyed by her and yet all he wanted was to be with her in death? Is that romantic? I thought he was a terrible, terrible man. The pages I enjoyed most were approximately the last twenty. I very much enjoyed Hareton and Catherine's relationship, but the rest made me sad and gloomy, which seems to be the predominate theme. I hated the way it was told. I was at first confused at who was speaking, because I thought it would be third-person telling the story or first-person through Cathy or Heathcliff. Yet it's this guy who was never in the 'important' part of the story. I felt so disconnected from Cathy and Heathcliff as the narrator heard it from the servant who knew them, and disliked the hero and heroine! I am a reader who despises when people are complete idiots. Mistakes happen, yes. But it's so frustrating when they act so stupid and rashly as these characters do! Even those who are emotional and passionate have SOME sort of common sense! I have no pity for the characters and could not relate to them at all, because they were so stupid and idiotic! I cannot agree with people who think it's a story of 'true love' and blah blah blah. Sorry, but if you were REALLY in love with somebody, you wouldn't have done anything that Cathy and Heathcliff did. This book is not a love story, it's a hate story.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 5, 2010

    love/hate

    I had a love/hate thing with this book. It's really weird but I want to read it again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2009

    Timeless

    Just what the doctor ordered !

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2007

    Disappointment

    i started reading this book cuz other ppl told me this was a good book. i started to get bored halfway thru the book but i kept on reading, thinking the book wuld get better soon. this book dragged alot and didnt really contain much excitement for me.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2007

    eh

    eh, so,so not the number one book but ain't that bad. on a scale of 1-10 on how good it is i would give it a three and on a scale of how bad it is i would give it a 7. i wouldn't recommend to people. dissapointing. waist of time. you should just read a GOOD book like fresh of the boat and so not the drama.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Fans

    Are you all fans of warrior books or what

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2014

    DashingFire

    Thanks floats out.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Karma

    "Anyone know where bloodclan is?"

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2013

    EnderNight ((Going to try my name this way!))

    She pads in. "Can i join?" ((Winterstar, is it you? Do you know Moonfur? Or Stormwing?))

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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