Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights

3.9 1249
by Emily Brontë

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Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte's only novel, is one of the pinnacles of 19th century English literature. It's the story of Heathcliff, an orphan who falls inlove with a girl above his class, loses her, and devotes the rest of his life to wreaking revenge on her family.  See more details below


Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte's only novel, is one of the pinnacles of 19th century English literature. It's the story of Heathcliff, an orphan who falls inlove with a girl above his class, loses her, and devotes the rest of his life to wreaking revenge on her family.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristina Cassidy
One of the greatest gothic romance novels of all time, Wuthering Heights is the story of a tortured and ultimately tragic romance between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff. The story is told in a series of flashbacks. Heathcliff is an orphan brought to Wuthering Heights by the kindly Mr. Earnshaw. Heathcliff's best friend as he grows up is Mr. Earnshaw's daughter, Catherine. Earnshaw's son, Hindley, hates Heathcliff and forces Heathcliff to work as a hired hand after his father's death. Catherine and Heathcliff fall in love, considering themselves two parts of one person, but Catherine chooses to marry a neighbor, Edgar Linton. Heathcliff is devastated at Catherine's betrayal and leaves. When he returns months later, he is wealthy and marries Edgar Linton's sister, Isabella. Heathcliff and Catherine fight bitterly over this development, but reconcile shortly before she dies in childbirth. Heathcliff spirals into madness, taking out his fury on the Earnshaws and Lintons, punishing even his and Catherine's children. This new edition of the classic novel includes a cover illustration and extra features designed to capitalize on the popularity of Stephenie Meyer's Twilight gothic romance series. The cover even proclaims Wuthering Heights "Bella and Edward's favorite book." The extras include a quiz, information about the traits of gothic romance, and trivia about Emily Bronte, as well as Facebook profiles and quizzes for Heathcliff and Catherine. Other classics given a similar treatment include Romeo and Juliet and Pride and Prejudice. Reviewer: Kristina Cassidy
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

This audio version of Emily Bronte's classic is narrated by Ann Flosnik. Initially, her narration makes it difficult to distinguish between characters, but as the tale progresses, her vocal characterizations become more dramatic and unique for each character, drawing listeners deeper and deeper into this dark and brooding love story. The first disk of the set also contains a PDF ebook of the full text of the novel which can be downloaded. Some students will want to read along with the narrated version, while others can use the ebook as a reference tool for class assignments. A nice addition to classic literature collections and a good way to enhance the English curriculum.-Anita Lawson, Otsego High School, Otsego, MI

Internet Book Watch
This abridged presentation of a classic brings to life Bronte's gothic romance and provides a powerful reading by Martin Shaw, whose voice perfectly captures this dark story of the moors. Those reluctant to read the full classic will find this audio version compelling and hard to quit listening to.
—Internet Book Watch
From the Publisher
"It is as if Emily Brontë could tear up all that we know human beings by, and fill these unrecognizable transparencies with such a gust of life that they transcend reality."
--Virginia Woolf

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Product Details

Capuchin Classics
Publication date:
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.70(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt


I have just returned from a visit to my landlord--the solitary neighbour that I shall be troubled with. This is certainly a beautiful country! In all England I do not believe that I could have fixed on a situation so completely removed from the stir of society. A perfect misanthropist's heaven; and Mr. Heathcliff and I are such a suitable pair to divide the desolation between us. A capital fellow! He little imagined how my heart warmed towards him when I beheld his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows, as I rode up, and when his fingers sheltered themselves, with a jealous resolution, still further in his waistcoat, as I announced my name.

"Mr. Heathcliff?" I said.

A nod was the answer.

"Mr. Lockwood, your new tenant, sir. I do myself the honour of calling as soon as possible after my arrival, to express the hope that I have not inconvenienced you by my perseverance in soliciting the occupation of Thrushcross Grange: I heard yesterday you had had some thoughts--"

"Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir," he interrupted, wincing. "I should not allow any one to inconvenience me, if I could hinder it--walk in!"

The "walk in" was uttered with closed teeth, and expressed the sentiment, "Go to the deuce": even the gate over which he leant manifested no sympathizing movement to the words; and I think that circumstance determined me to accept the invitation: I felt interested in a man who seemed more exaggeratedly reserved than myself.

When he saw my horse's breast fairly pushing the barrier, he did put out his hand to unchain it, and then sullenly preceded me up the causeway, calling, as we entered thecourt--"Joseph, take Mr. Lockwood's horse; and bring up some wine."

"Here we have the whole establishment of domestics, I suppose," was the reflection suggested by this compound order. "No wonder the grass grows up between the flags, and cattle are the only hedge-cutters."

Joseph was an elderly, nay, an old man: very old, perhaps, though hale and sinewy. "The Lord help us!" he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine aid to digest his dinner, and his pious ejaculation had no reference to my unexpected advent.

Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff's dwelling. "Wuthering" being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather. Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun. Happily the architect had foresight to build it strong: the narrow windows are deeply set in the wall, and the corners defended with large jutting stones.

Before passing the threshold, I paused to admire a quantity of grotesque carving lavished over the front, and especially about the principal door; above which, among a wilderness of crumbling griffins and shameless little boys, I detected the date "1500," and the name "Hareton Earnshaw." I would have made a few comments, and requested a short history of the place from the surly owner; but his attitude at the door appeared to demand my speedy entrance, or complete departure, and I had no desire to aggravate his impatience previous to inspecting the penetralium.

One step brought us into the family sitting-room, without any introductory lobby or passage. They call it here "the house" pre-eminently. It includes kitchen and parlour, generally; but I believe at Wuthering Heights the kitchen is forced to retreat altogether into another quarter: at least I distinguished a chatter of tongues, and a clatter of culinary utensils, deep within; and I observed no signs of roasting, boiling, or baking, about the huge fireplace; nor any glitter of copper saucepans and tin cullenders on the walls. One end, indeed, reflected splendidly both light and heat from ranks of immense pewter dishes, interspersed with silver jugs and tankards, towering row after row, on a vast oak dresser, to the very roof. The latter had never been underdrawn: its entire anatomy lay bare to an inquiring eye, except where a frame of wood laden with oatcakes and clusters of legs of beef, mutton, and ham concealed it. Above the chimney were sundry villainous old guns and a couple of horse-pistols: and, by way of ornament, three gaudily painted canisters disposed along its ledge. The floor was of smooth, white stone; the chairs, high-backed, primitive structures, painted green: one or two heavy black ones lurking in the shade. In an arch under the dresser reposed a huge liver-coloured bitch pointer, surrounded by a swarm of squealing puppies; and other dogs haunted other recesses.

The apartment and furniture would have been nothing extraordinary as belonging to a homely, northern farmer, with a stubborn countenance and stalwart limbs set out to advantage in knee-breeches and gaiters. Such an individual seated in his armchair, his mug of ale frothing on the round table before him, is to be seen in any circuit of five or six miles among these hills, if you go at the right time after dinner. But Mr. Heathcliff forms a singular contrast to his abode and style of living. He is a dark-skinned gipsy in aspect, in dress and manners a gentleman: that is, as much a gentleman as many a country squire: rather slovenly, perhaps, yet not looking amiss with his negligence, because he has an erect and handsome figure; and rather morose. Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of underbred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling--to manifestations of mutual kindliness. He'll love and hate equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to be loved or hated again. No, I'm running on too fast: I bestow my own attributes over liberally on him. Mr. Heathcliff may have entirely dissimilar reasons for keeping his hand out of the way when he meets a would-be acquaintance, to those which actuate me. Let me hope my constitution is almost peculiar: my dear mother used to say I should never have a comfortable home; and only last summer I proved myself perfectly unworthy of one.

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What People are saying about this

Charlotte Bronte
Wuthering Heights was hewn in a wild workshop, with simple tools, out of homely materials... And there it stands colossal, dark, and frowning, half statue, half rock; in the former sense, terrible and goblin-like; in the latter, almost beautiful, for its colouring is of mellow grey, and moorland moss clothes it; and heath, with its blooming bells and balmy fragrance, grows faithfully close to the giant's foot.

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Wuthering Heights 3.9 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 1249 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I decided to read this book after I saw it mentioned several times throughout the 'Twilight Series' by Stephenie Meyer. In the book 'Eclipse', Bella compared herself to the character of Catherine and being that I had never read 'Wuthering Heights' I thought I would give it a go. I'll have to admit that it was hard to read at times because the language back then was so different yet beautiful as well. I could definitely see similarities between the love triangle that exists between Catherine, Heathcliff, and Edgar compared to that of Bella, Edward, and Jacob in 'Twilight'. I think it was a good story and I'm glad that I did read it because now I can go back through the 'Twilight' books and know what Bella means when she mentions the different characters from the story. Good stuff...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
To read this novel is to succumb to a world that is strange and beautiful and cruel and mesmerizing. It reads like a dream written in poetry. It is not an easy read, but it is well worth the effort it takes to understand its complex structure, psychologically nuanced characters, and rich language. It's reputation as a love story is misleading. It is a story of love in all of its complex manifestations but not the romantic love of pulp fiction. The love Bronte refers to is love that is ambivalent, sadistic, obsessive, and, literally, maddening. Wuthering Heights is a true work of art that deserves to be read and re-read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm generally not interested in the 'classic' genre and I was expecting a really slow start to Wuthering Heights, because that is what I discovered with reading Jane Eyre (I do understand that they are written by two different authors but I had expected their literary styles to be similar because the sisters were so close to each other). When I read the book for school over the summer, I was delighted to find the story fast paced, interesting, and simple yet still powerful. The intense, complex, (and somewhat boring) conversations that took place in Jane Eyre are absent from Wuthering Heights. The deeper meaning in the story is instead found more within the characters' actions, and relationships with one another. I found the characters loveable and memorable, though some of them were a little twisted.
Guest More than 1 year ago
All of my life, I had heard of the dark novel, Wuthering Heights. I had read reviews describing its complicated twists, evil characters, and intense plots. After years of putting it off, I bought it, not giving myself the chance to look back at the Classics section on my way out. I decided it was time. Cautiously opening the first page, I prepared myself. I prepared myself for a long, complicated, sometimes scary read. What I got was a hurricane of emotions that I believe every human being is capable of. Not only was it an absorbing, fascinating read, but it was a revelation. I realized for the first time in my life that every human has a dark side that he keeps hidden in the chambers of his heart. Yet what if we, the human race, were to let our emotions rule us? What if our passions were portrayed for all the world to see? I imagine that is what Emily Bronte had in mind when she first envisioned this novel, her soul masterpiece. She exposed the human race as it really is: Warm, Passionate, Tempestuous, Melancholy, and sometimes a bit Playful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I actually got into this book by Stephanie Meyer's 'Twilight' series because they mentioned it a lot in those books. Im extrememly glad I did take the time to read this book though because it was fanominal. It's your classic love story, with a twist of evil you didn't think possible from one person [that person being Heathcliff]. The old english talk can get confusing, so it's definately one for the older readers. All and all, it's one of my all-time favorite books.
Nini_ More than 1 year ago
I am really passionate about Wuthering Heights. After reading it in 10th grade, it's been my favorite romance novel. It's so intensely intense. I actually don't have this version of the book, I have the Norton edition, but I really like this cover. To sum up Wuthering Heights in a sentence, it's a novel that tells the story of two people, Catherine and Heathcliff, who are fiercely, and almost violently, in love with each other but can't truly, physically be together until they are in the grave. It's simply phenomenal!
memee1207 More than 1 year ago
This is a great book, however, this version is sprinkled with typos. For example, every time there is an apostrophe followed by two "L"s, it comes out as an eleven. I.e., "We'll" becomes "We'11," etc. It's not exactly a deal breaker, given that it's a free copy. It does get a little taxing to try to figure out each typographical error.
Fawn48340 More than 1 year ago
i'v heard much about this book from many people,decided to finally read it. had a hard time keeping names straight and who's who. and who was the strory teller. once i finally caught on to how the book was written i enjoyed it the whole time. i didnt want to put it down. i cant believe how much drama was put into one book. i think i will read it again soon. it wont be a disapointment to anyone reading it.
Glorr More than 1 year ago
I had a love/hate thing with this book. It's really weird but I want to read it again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pads in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hopefull- hissed and curled her tail around her kit <p> waterkit and grasskit mewl in protest
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Put 4 more shes at prism res.2
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She sighed clearly upset but obeyed Thistlefang. "I'll kill you next time, Sandpour." She promised, exiting the clearing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sidesteps and dodges thistlefang. I may not be as young as the others but i am not an idi.ot
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
(May I join?)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Srry im not very active. Life in rl is hard.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She wakes up in a tree. Before she had the chance to get up the branch cracked off and fell. She landed on her back with a small , low thud. Se sighed and got up , shaking the dirt that had collected in her fur. <br> ~ TigerNight ~
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gtg to school bbl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Move swiftly to My Place At the Baazar. We will continue there.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi guys.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*Looks up at austin confuzed*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Erm... thank you? *he scratches his head, then begins eating the Jello* Enjoy thy parading, buddeh.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Why," He sighed, walking in with his hands in his pockets, "Did we move? There was like, fifteen double results." ~Evan <p> Logan walked in beside his cousin, his hood up. He slowly nodded his head in agreement, rolling his eyes. ~Logan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
'Cause people are crazy. O.e
Anonymous More than 1 year ago