Wyatt Earp: The Life behind the Legend by Casey Tefertiller, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Wyatt Earp: The Life behind the Legend

Wyatt Earp: The Life behind the Legend

4.5 13
by Casey Tefertiller
     
 

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"Quite impressive. I doubt if there has been or will be a more deeply researched and convincing account." —Evan Connell, author Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn

"The book to end all Earp books—the most complete, and most meticulously researched." —Jack Burrows, author John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was

"The

Overview

"Quite impressive. I doubt if there has been or will be a more deeply researched and convincing account." —Evan Connell, author Son of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn

"The book to end all Earp books—the most complete, and most meticulously researched." —Jack Burrows, author John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was

"The most thoughtful, well-researched, and comprehensive account that has been written about the development and career of an Old-West lawman." —The Tombstone Tumbleweed

"A great adventure story, and solid history." —Kirkus Reviews

"A major contribution to the history of the American West. It provides the first complete and accurate look at Wyatt Earp's colorful career, and places into context the important role that he and his brothers played in crime and politics in the Arizona territory. This important book rises above the realm of Western biography and shows the development of the Earp story in history and myth, and its effect on American culture." —John Boessenecker, author Gold Dust and Gunsmoke

"The ultimate Wyatt Earp book." —Professor Richard Brown University of Oregon

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Forget what you saw at the movies-this biography of the legend of the Old West shows that the facts are more interesting than the legend."—The New York Times Book Review

"The most thoughtful, well-researched, and comprehensive account that has been written about the development and career of an Old-West lawman."—The Tombstone Tumbleweed

"The book to end all Earp books—the most complete, and most meticulously researched."—Jack Burrows, author of John Ringo: The Gunfighter Who Never Was

"Quite impressive. I doubt if there has been or will be a more deeply researched and convincing account."—Evan Connell, author of The Sun of the Morning Star

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471283621
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/28/1999
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
172,208
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.16(d)

What People are saying about this

Evan Connell
Quite impressive. I doubt if there's been or will be a more deeply researched and convincing account.
— Evan Connell, author of Sun of the Morning Star: Custer and the Little Bighorn

Meet the Author

CASEY TEFERTILLER is a former writer for the San Francisco Examiner with a keen interest in the American West.

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Wyatt Earp: The Life behind the Legend 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Casey Tefertiller's biography of Wyatt Earp is a very interesting book written in a somewhat scholarly manner. Terertiller makes a serious effort to give a full account of Earp's life with a special emphasis on his exploits in Dodge and Tombstone. The picture of Earp that emerges is that of a complex man who is cool in a crisis and has the ability to profit from his mistakes. Earp is portrayed as being dependable and courageous - a cut above the ordinary lawman of the Old West. He is also an opportunist who never quite manages to strike it rich. Earp's long career included stints as lawman, boxing referee, gambler, saloon manager, Indian fighter, miner, capitalist and horseman. He died in 1929 at age eighty in Los Angeles.
Charlottes-son More than 1 year ago
I can hardly keep this book on the shelf. So many like this book that I have to replace it periodically. Well written to begin with. This look at the meth and legend also looks inward, that sometimes we are on one side of the law, and sometimes not. The chapter on the entrance of statehood is also enlightening. A good read, and a good book to share.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MJT More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book in providing the reader with the greatest field of facts to determine the truth behind the western legend. I believe the author completed painstaking research, enabling the most accurate and objective approach possible, to tell the Earp story. The book was well written, and propels the reader on a path from the early days of the Earp story, through the death of the principal characters. Further, the book reveals interesting facts following Wyatt Earp's death relating to the changing stories presented about the legend in Hollywood movies and television. I also found the book to be particularly timely when discussing the affects the newspapers in Tombstone had in shaping the "facts" at the time Wyatt Earp lived in Tombstone. The unkind words printed at that time left me contrasting the media venue of the 19th century, with that of today--it reminded me of the old saying, "the more things change, the more they stay the same." One telling excerpt in the book regarding this thought is as follows, "Reading the papers a century later, it becomes evident each was devoted more to furthering its own agenda than to reporting the news." Overall the book was terrific and I highly recommend it for the Old West historical buff or the novice who just wants to know more about Wyatt Earp and the life he lived!
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TomBarnes39 More than 1 year ago
Casey Tefertiller¿s Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend begins with Cowtown Justice and the young lawman¿s early efforts to apply the law in the Kansas communities of Wichita and Dodge City. Wyatt Earp gained wide community approval with his quite way of dealing with explosive situations.
Tefertiller chronicles the Dodge City era of the 1870¿s and Wyatt Earp¿s role as a lawman. Toward the end of the 1879 cattle season Wyatt joined his brothers and made the move to the silver mining camp at Tombstone, Arizona.
There is no doubt that silver was the big lure to the mining camp and he had some financial success in the mining industry. But Wyatt always considered himself a lawman and took an appointment as Deputy US Marshal.
Wyatt Earp was on the Tombstone streets during 1880 and 1881 and had first hand knowledge of the good and the bad. He witnessed corrupt politicians and their muscle, called the cowboys, bully and intimidate the citizens of Tombstone. A confrontation was set in motion during the summer of 1881 when Wyatt Earp and Johnny Behan squared off as political opponents to run for Cochise County Sheriff. And adding to their adversarial positions was the fact that both men were seeking the hand of a pretty young lady named Josephine Marcus.
Tombstone residents continued to be plagued with the bullying tactics of the cowboys and all that came to a head on the afternoon of October 26, 1881 when the cowboy¿s ignored a city ordinance and refused to surrender their firearms. A gunfight followed and the cowboy¿s lost three of their men.
The shootout didn¿t end the conflict though, because Ike Clanton filed murder charges against the Earps and Holliday. Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were hauled into Judge Wells Spicer¿s court for a hearing. Prosecution and the defense called a string of witnesses to the stand, but at the end of the 28-day hearing Judge Spicer ruled in favor of the defense. But the feud continued. Virgil Earp received three shotgun blasts and was almost killed while making his night rounds and Morgan Earp was shot in the back and killed by night guns.
Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were marked for assassination, and left the Tombstone area for Colorado to avoid a complete bloodbath. Wyatt married Josephine Marcus and they followed the silver and gold mining strikes from Idaho to Alaska. Wyatt later dabbled in commercial real estate, horse racing and for a while was a Wells Fargo special detective. In his latter years he lived in Los Angeles and was a movie consultant on western films. Wyatt Earp died in his Los Angeles home in 1929. Casey Tefertiller tells the Wyatt Earp story in a straightforward style that leaves the reader with an indelible picture of that famous Frontier Lawman.
Tom Barnes author of `Doc Holliday¿s Road to Tombstone.¿
Guest More than 1 year ago
Casey Tefertiller¿s Wyatt Earp: The Life Behind the Legend begins with Cowtown Justice and the young lawman¿s early efforts to apply the law in the Kansas communities of Wichita and Dodge City. Wyatt Earp gained wide community approval with his quite way of dealing with explosive situations. Tefertiller chronicles the Dodge City era of the 1870¿s and Wyatt Earp¿s role as lawman. Toward the end of the 1879 cattle season Wyatt joined his brothers and made the move to the silver mining camp at Tombstone, Arizona. There is no doubt that silver was the big lure to the mining camp and the Earps had some financial success in the mining industry. But when other financial investments didn't work out Wyatt fell back on his law and order background and took an appointment as Deputy US Marshal. Wyatt Earp was on the Tombstone streets during 1880 and 1881 and had first hand knowledge of the good and the bad. He witnessed corrupt politicians and their muscle called the cowboys bully and intimidate the citizens of Tombstone. A confrontation was set in motion during the summer of 1881 when Wyatt Earp and Johnny Behan squared off as political opponents to run for Cochise County Sheriff. And adding to their adversarial positions was the fact that both men were seeking the hand of a pretty young lady named Josephine Marcus. Tombstone residents continued to be plagued with the bullying tactics of the cowboys and all that came to a head on the afternoon of October 26, 1881 when the cowboy¿s ignored a city ordinance and refused to surrender their firearms. A gunfight followed and the cowboy¿s lost three of their men. The shootout didn¿t end the conflict though, because Ike Clanton filed murder charges against the Earps and Holliday. Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were hauled into Judge Wells Spicer¿s court for a hearing. Prosecution and the defense called a string of witnesses to the stand, but at the end of the 28-day hearing Judge Spicer ruled in favor of the defense. But the feud continued. Virgil Earp received three shotgun blasts and was almost killed while making his night rounds and Morgan Earp was shot in the back and killed by night guns. Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday were marked for assassination, and left the Tombstone area for Colorado to avoid a complete bloodbath. Wyatt married Josephine Marcus and they followed the silver and gold mining strikes from Idaho to Alaska. Wyatt later dabbled in commercial real estate, horse racing and for a while was a Wells Fargo special detective. In his latter years he lived in Los Angeles and was a movie consultant on western films. Wyatt Earp died in his Los Angeles home in 1929. Casey Tefertiller tells the Wyatt Earp story in a straightforward style that leaves the reader with an indelible picture of that famous Frontier Lawman. Tom Barnes author of ¿Doc Holliday¿s Road to Tombstone.¿