X-Teams: How to Build Teams That Lead, Innovate, and Succeed

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$14.60
(Save 54%)
Est. Return Date: 06/16/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$21.40
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$18.82
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $3.60
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 88%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (26) from $3.60   
  • New (14) from $16.62   
  • Used (12) from $3.60   

Overview


Why do good teams fail? Very often, argue Deborah Ancona and Henrik Bresman, it is because they are looking inward instead of outward. Based on years of research examining teams across many industries, Ancona and Bresman show that traditional team models are falling short, and that what’s needed--and what works--is a new brand of team that emphasizes external outreach to stakeholders, extensive ties, expandable tiers, and flexible membership.

The authors highlight that X-teams not only are able to adapt in ways that traditional teams aren’t, but that they actually improve an organization’s ability to produce creative ideas and execute them—increasing the entrepreneurial and innovative capacity within the firm. What’s more, the new environment demands what the authors call “distributed leadership,” and the book highlights how X-teams powerfully embody this idea.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

TIME.com
The authors dive into the nitty-gritty details of engineering a better team . . .
The Globe & Mail
The book expands our thinking about teams...comfortable reading, broken down into clear sections . . .
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591396925
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
  • Publication date: 6/26/2007
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 655,123
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     IX
Introduction: When Bad Things Happen to Good Teams     1
Why Good Teams Fail
Into a Downward Spiral     21
How Our Old Models Lead to Failure
A Changing World     41
New Kinds of Organizations
New Kinds of Teams
What Works
X-Team Principle 1     63
External Activity
X-Team Principle 2     89
Extreme Execution
X-Team Principle 3     117
Flexible Phases
X-Factors     139
The X-Team Support Structure
How to Build Effective X-Teams
Tools for X-Teams     165
From Theory to Action
Crafting an Infrastructure for Innovation     195
The X-Team Program
X-Teams     217
Distributed Leadership in Action
Notes     241
Index     249
About the Authors     259
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2007

    A methodology for managing teams and projects.

    Years of research show that a team that focuses solely on internal team building is likely to fail. The ¿X-team¿ emphasizes external activity, and a flexible membership and leadership structure. Deborah Ancona and Henrik Bresman write that such a team is not only more likely to succeed, but will often exceed managerial expectations. This book, divided into three sections, tells you why some teams fail, how to create one that works and how to manage it through every phase of a project. The authors make liberal use of examples from major corporations, such as BP and Microsoft, to illustrate all their principles. The terminology is somewhat proprietary, but the approach makes a great deal of sense. We recommend this book to managers and team members alike.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)