BN.com Gift Guide

XHTML

( 2 )

Overview

If you're a Web developer who has worked with HTML, you will find much of XHTML instantly familiar and readily usable. However, there are parts of XHTML that are derived from XML, which may be unfamiliar and perhaps a bit harder to understand. In XHTML, Chelsea Valentine and Chris Minnick provide the explanations and explorations that will help you become familiar and comfortable with the “X” in XHTML. XHTML addresses the need of working Web professionals to learn what XHTML is and how best to use it, and helps ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $45.00   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

If you're a Web developer who has worked with HTML, you will find much of XHTML instantly familiar and readily usable. However, there are parts of XHTML that are derived from XML, which may be unfamiliar and perhaps a bit harder to understand. In XHTML, Chelsea Valentine and Chris Minnick provide the explanations and explorations that will help you become familiar and comfortable with the “X” in XHTML. XHTML addresses the need of working Web professionals to learn what XHTML is and how best to use it, and helps those who are contemplating making the switch from HTML to XHTML decide if and when to take the plunge. Both the authors not only write about and teach XHTML, but also consult and implement this technology as part of their workday routines. They've learned from their audiences and students what people most need to know, and what examples and illustrations best illuminate that information. That collective wisdom drives this book throughout.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735710344
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 1/9/2001
  • Series: Landmark Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 7.03 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Table of Contents

1 Introducing XHTML 1
What Is XML? 2
XHTML Is XML 4
XHTML History and Antecedents 5
The XHTML 1.0 Specification 6
About Backward Compatibility 9
The Argument for Adopting XHTML 10
For More Information 11
2 All About Markup 13
The Purpose of Markup 13
The Importance of Well-Formed and Valid Documents 17
Of Elements, Attributes, Entities, and More 18
How XML Changes HTML to XHTML 25
Making XHTML Work for You 26
For More Information 27
3 Overview of Element Structure 29
Common Attributes 29
Alphabetic Listing of Elements 31
For More Information 103
4 Converting HTML to XHTML 105
Differences Between HTML and XHTML 105
Compatibility Issues and Browser Requirements 109
Mechanical Translation from HTML to XHTML 110
Working with HTML Tidy 115
For More Information 119
5 Working with Web Development Tools 121
Dancing on the Bleeding Edge 121
Who's Hip to XHTML? 122
Other Tools, Other Rules 134
For More Information 134
6 Adding Style with CSS 135
Why Use CSS? 135
CSS for Today 142
CSS Basics 143
Property Categories 151
Adding CSS to XHTML Documents 158
Adding CSS to XML Documents 160
For More Information 160
7 Adding Style with XSL 161
What Is XSL 162
Transforming Your Pages with XSLT 168
Associating Style Sheets with Your Documents 182
Adding CSS to Your Transformed Documents 183
XSLT Tools 183
For More Information 184
8 Understanding XForms 185
The History of Web Forms 185
Why Use Forms at All? 186
Using Forms Today 187
Present-Day Limitations 189
What Exactly Are XForms? 190
For More Information 192
9 Calling Scripts and Other Objects 193
Working with Media Types in XHTML 194
The Document Object Model 196
Creating Dynamic XHTML Pages 200
Object Element 206
Using Java Applets 209
Providing Alternatives 211
For More Information 212
10 Working with Multimedia and Graphics 213
SVG Takes on Graphics 214
Moving Beyond Static Images 221
Working with Audio 224
Making Movies 226
For More Information 227
11 Advanced Linking Techniques 229
History and Theory of Linking 229
XLink Basic Concepts 233
Linking Elements with XLink 236
The Role and Reason for XPointer 243
XPointer and References 243
Understanding XPath 246
Bringing XLink, XPointer, and XPath Together 253
The State of XLink Today 254
For More Information 255
12 The Benefits of Extensibility 257
When Structure Matters Most 260
Let the Data Drive Your Development 261
Of DTDs and Schemas 265
XML Schema 275
Adding to the Base Namespace 276
Incorporating XML Applications 278
For More Information 282
13 Where the Future Leads, XHTML Follows 283
Upcoming Design Trends 284
XHTML 1.1 Goes Modular 288
Tracking Key Working Groups and Specifications 291
Emerging Development Efforts 294
Incorporating Legacy Web Sites with the Future 296
For More Information 297
A XHTML 1.0: The Extensible HyperText Markup Language 299
A Reformulation of HTML 4 in XML 1.0
W3C Recommendation 26 January 2000 299
Abstract 300
Status of This Document 300
1. What Is XHTML? 300
2. Definitions 303
3. Normative Definition of XHTML 1.0 304
4. Differences with HTML 4 308
5. Compatibility Issues 311
6. Future Directions 311
Appendix A DTDs 312
Appendix B Element Prohibitions 313
Appendix C HTML Compatibility Guidelines 313
Appendix D Acknowledgements 317
Appendix E References 317
B XHTML Elements and Attributes 319
C CSS Properties Listed Alphabetically 345
D A Compendium of HTML, XML, and XHTML Resources 363
The Standards 364
Online Resources 364
Tools 367
Books 370
Magazines 370
E Glossary 371
F Contents on the CD-ROM 377
What You Will Find 377
What You Need to Get Started 378
How to Get Started 378
CD Contents 378
Software Included 379
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2001

    Book provides a solid footing in XHTML

    XHTML or Extensible Hypertext markup Language is one of the Internet¿s newer languages. XHTML begins by giving a basic overview of what it is. The authors devote 70 pages to elements such as big, cite, superscript and subscript plus many, many others! They go on to explain the major differences between HTML and XHTML and browser requirements and compatibility issues. Other subjects included in XHTML are XSL (one chapter), Xforms (a very brief discussion), Creating Dynamic XHTML Pages (18 pages) and Working with Multimedia and Graphics (Chapter 10). In comparing XSL to CSS, there is a graphic to show when and where to use each language. Don¿t forget to read the chapter on converting existing HTML to XHTML. With a 100 plus pages of reference material AND a CD-ROM, XHTML should provide the reader with a solid footing in this up and coming language.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2001

    Comprehensive guide to XHTML

    This is a great book for those making the transition from HTML to XHTML. Very comprehensive and well-written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)