XML and Java: Developing Web Applications [With CDROM] / Edition 2

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $65.48   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$65.48
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(2)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New

Ships from: Idyllwild, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Close
Sort by

Overview

Fully revised to cover the latest standards and technologies, XML and Java™, Second Edition provides the practical solutions developers need to design powerful and portable Web-based applications. Featuring step-by-step examples, this book focuses on harnessing the power of Java™ and XML together to streamline the development process.

XML and Java™, Second Edition provides new coverage of emerging areas such as document management, databases, messaging, servlets, JDBC, data binding, security, and more. It begins with an overview of XML programming techniques, standard APIs, and tools. Building upon this foundation, the book goes on to cover the latest technologies, including DOM Level 2, SAX2, XSLT, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI. It explores the role of these major middleware technologies in XML and Java-based Web application development, as well as the limitations and potential pitfalls.

Topic coverage includes:

  • The role of XML and Java in Web applications
  • Parsing XML documents
  • How to use the Document Object Model (DOM) Level 1 and DOM Level 2 APIs
  • How to work with SAX
  • Techniques for making the most of existing XML processors
  • W3C XML Schema and OASIS RELAX NG
  • The XML application server, XML and databases, and XML messaging, including SOAP
  • Techniques for storing XML documents by using JDBC
  • Information on Web services, including WSDL and UDDI
  • How to represent data in XML (data binding)
  • Standard techniques for securing B2B applications
  • XML Schema languages

Combining a team of experienced authors with a practical cookbook-style approach and packed with useful sample code, XML and Java™, Second Edition provides the most complete toolset available for developers navigating the next frontier of Web-based business applications.

0201770040B05082002


Designed for programmers familiar with Java and XML, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how to create robust XML web applications with Java technology. Through step-by-step instructions and real-world examples, it shows you how to create web applications, such as an updating and messaging weather page. The authors are a team of IBM XML experts.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
After they created the influential XML4J Parser way back in ’97, this leading-edge IBM development team wrote the first edition of XML and Java -- one of the first books to discuss writing programs using XML-based data formats. We’ve come a long way since then, and XML and Java, Second Edition documents that progress exceptionally well.

Like the first edition, it focuses on using XML, Java, and the constellation of technologies surrounding them to solve real business problems. Since both XML and Java have matured, the authors now have an entire industry to draw upon, so they go far beyond the IBM-oriented focus of the first edition. We now have XSLT, XML Schema, and new J2EE APIs for manipulating XML -- not to mention the whole new Web Services paradigm. This book integrates all these advances.

You’ll start with the proven techniques that underlie all XML development, including parsing, generation, serialization, schemas, namespaces, and converting parse results into application-specific data structures. In Part II, you focus on newer technologies, including the construction of servlet/JSP XML applications; working with SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI; data binding, XML security, and even the latest XML grammars. The result: a book that’s even more useful than its predecessor. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

From The Critics
Written by members of IBM's Tokyo research lab, this guide explains how to develop Java programs that deal with XML as the input and output data format. The second edition has been substantially expanded to cover DOM level 2, SAX2, XSLT, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI. The CD-ROM contains sample programs and trial versions of WebSphere and DB2. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Booknews
This tutorial shows Web developers, programmers, and system engineers how to create XML business applications for the Internet using Java. Topics include document management and metacontent, databases, messaging, servlets, JDBC, security, and JavaBeans. A basic understanding of XML and experience writing simple Java programs is required. The CD-ROM contains cross-platform source code and trial versions of WebSphere, DB2, and VisualAge. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201770049
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 5/28/2002
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 661
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Hiroshi Maruyama, Senior Technical Staff Member at IBM’s Tokyo Research Laboratory, led a team specializing in the development of advanced XML technologies. Kent Tamura is the creator of IBM XML Parser for Java (since renamed Xerces and made open source). Naohiko Uramoto is a visiting Associate Professor at the National Institute of Informatics who specializes in advanced Web services development. Makoto Murata is an affiliated researcher at the International University of Japan and a member of the original working group that created XML 1.0. Andy Clark is a developer of the Apache Xerces XML parser in Java and the primary designer and lead technical expert for the new Xerces2 parser. Yuichi Nakamura is a contributor to the Apache SOAP and Axis projects. Ryo Neyama is a contributor to the Apache SOAP and Axis projects. Kazuya Kosaka is the manager of the Internet Technology Group and, most recently, the developer of XML-based security technologies.

Satoshi Hada is currently working on XML Access Control and SOAP Security Extensions.

0201770040AB05082002

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

When we had the opportunity to write a book on

We have the same goals in this edition with more new technologies—to show how the emerging technologies around

This book has two parts. The first half covers basic tools for dealing with

All the sample programs in the book are available on the accompanying CD-ROM. Each sample has its own Readme file that describes how to set up and run it. It is our strong belief that knowledge about new software technologies can be acquired only through playing with them—running them, changing the configurations and modifying lines of code, and rerunning them to see the effects. We recommend that readers try the samples on the CD-ROM as much as possible. We made every effort to ensure that the samples are complete and run on most, if not all, platforms that support the latest Java runtimes. Any updates to the contents of the book can be downloaded from the publisher’s Web site at http://www.awl.com/cseng/.


Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

1. Web Applications, XML, and Java.

Introduction.

Structure of This Book.

Web Applications.

From Static Contents to Dynamic Contents.

From B2C to B2B-From Web for Eyeballs to Web for Programs.

Interoperability Is Everything.

From Distributed Applications to Decentralized Applications.

The World of Web Services-More Dynamic Integration.

Other Application Areas of XML.

Metadata.

Configuration Files.

Rich Documents.

Some XML Basics.

Standardization Process.

Validity and Well-Formedness.

Namespaces.

Summary.

2. Parsing XML Documents.

Introduction.

XML Processors.

Working with Xerces.

Basics of Parsing Documents.

Parsing Well-Formed Documents.

Parsing Valid Documents.

Design Point: Well-Formed versus Valid.

More about Parsing XML Documents.

Parsing XML Documents with Namespaces.

Parsing XML Documents with XML Schema.

Design Point: The DTD versus XML Schema.

Parsing XML Documents with JAXP.

Design Point: JAXP and XercesNative API.

Programming Interfaces for Document Structure.

DOM: Tree-Based API.

SAX: Event-Driven API.

Design Point: DOM versus SAX.

Summary.

3. Generating and Serializing XML Documents.

Introduction.

Creating a DOM Tree from Scratch.

Creating a Document Object.

Creating and Appending Child Nodes.

Handling Namespaces.

Validating a Generated DOM Tree.

Serializing a DOM Tree.

Using the XMLSerializer Package.

Discussions about Serialization.

Handling Whitespace.

Internationalization.

XML Declarations.

Charset Parameter.

Summary.

4. Working with DOM.

Introduction.

DOM Basics.

Accessing and Updating the Status of a Node.

Accessing Structural Information.

Inserting, Detaching, and Replacing a Child Node.

DOM Tree and Attributes.

Advanced DOM.

How to Simplify Your Code by Removing Entity References.

Tree Traversal.

DOM Collection Is Live.

Moving Nodes over Documents.

Namespaces in DOM.

Summary.

5. Working with SAX.

Introduction.

Basic Tips for Using SAX.

ContentHandler.

Using and Writing SAX Filters.

New Features of SAX2.

DOM versus SAX.

Performance: Memory and Speed.

Conversion from DOM to SAX and Vice Versa.

Summary.

6. Parser Tricks.

Introduction.

General Tricks.

Namespace Validation with DTDs.

Entity Resolution.

Working with Sockets.

Basic Xerces Tricks.

Extended Parser Options.

Custom DOM Implementation.

Advanced Xerces Tricks.

The Xerces Native Interface.

Components and the Component Manager.

Parser Configurations.

Building Parser Configurations from Xerces2 Components.

Summary.

7. XPath and XSLT.

XPath.

What Is XPath?

Syntax and Semantics of XPath.

XPath and Namespaces.

XPath Programming in Java.

XSLT.

What Is XSLT?

Syntax and Semantics of XSLT.

XSLT Programming in Java.

Pros and Cons of XSLT, XPath, DOM, and SAX.

Execution Efficiency.

Development Efficiency.

Summary.

8. Bridging Application Data Structure and XML.

Introduction.

Mapping to Almost Isomorphic Tree Structures.

Structure Adjustment by XSLT.

Mapping to Tables.

Mapping to Hash Tables.

Mapping to Graph Structures.

Summary.

9. Working with Schemas: Datatypes and Namespaces.

Introduction.

W3C XML Schema.

Mimicking DTDs.

Datatypes.

Using Namespaces.

Advanced Features.

Further Information.

RELAX NG.

Mimicking DTDs.

Using Datatypes and Facets of W3C XML Schema.

Using Namespaces.

Co-occurrence Constraints.

Further Information.

Summary.

10. XML Application Server.

The Background of the XML Application Server.

The Need for a Common Framework for Building Web Applications.

What Is an XML Application Server?

Servlet.

Returning XML Documents from a Servlet.

Receiving XML Documents.

Considerations for State Management.

JavaServer Pages.

What Is JSP?

An Informational JSP Returning XML Documents.

The Combination of Servlet and JSP.

Apache Cocoon.

Having Well-Grounded Goals.

Integrating and Multichanneling XML Documents Using Cocoon.

Summary.

11. XML and Databases.

Introduction.

Storing and Searching for XML Documents.

Mapping from an XML Document to Tables.

Designing Relational Tables.

Defining the Primary Keys in a Table.

Designing a Table for MultiplyOccurring Elements.

Datatype Mapping.

Semantics of Data.

Two Approaches.

Mapping from Tables to an XML Document.

Nested and Flat Representation.

Element versus Attribute Representation.

Program Examples.

Mapping Method.

XPath Method.

A Servlet for Accessing a Database.

Working with EJB.

The Importance of EJB.

A Simple EJB.

Summary.

12. XML Messaging.

Introduction.

Distributed Computing and Interoperability.

Overview of XML Messaging.

New-Generation Distributed Programming.

Simple Object Access Protocol.

The Birth of SOAP.

Travel Reservation Example.

Basic Concepts of SOAP.

To Use SOAP or Not?

SOAP Engines.

Prototyping a SOAP Engine.

SOAP Engine Products.

Java API for SOAP.

Summary.

13. Web Services.

Emergence of Web Services.

Publishing, Finding, and Integration.

What Are Web Services?

Status of Web Services.

Web Services Description.

Overview of WSDL.

WSDL as an Interface Definition Language.

WSDL Tools.

Programming with WSDL4J.

JAX-RPC.

Service Registration and Discovery.

Overview of UDDI.

Programming with UDDI4J.

Registering WSDL with the UDDI Registry.

Application to Dynamic e-Business.

Application Scenario.

Discovering Businesses on the Fly.

Dynamic Binding.

Enterprise Web Services.

Summary.

14. Security.

Introduction.

IT System Security in General.

Security Requirements on B2B Systems.

Security of Communication.

Access Control.

SSL/TLS.

Server Authentication.

Client Authentication.

Selecting a Public-Key Infrastructure.

Configuring a Server and a Client for SSL/TLS.

SSL/TLS Programming in Java.

Firewall Considerations.

Summary of Using SSL/TLS.

XML Digital Signature.

XML Canonicalization.

XML Digital Signature Sample.

Signing XML Documents with XML Security Suite for Java.

Verifying XML Digital Signature with XML Security Suite for Java.

Access Control in Java.

Declarative Access Control and Programmatic Access Control.

Declarative Access Control.

Programmatic Access Control.

Security Architecture of EJB.

Security in Web Services.

Using SSL/TLS and XML Digital Signature in SOAP.

Access Control in SOAP Applications.

Partial Encryption of XML.

Security Service as Web Services.

Summary.

15. Data Binding.

Introduction.

Generating Java Classes from a Schema.

JAXB.

Relaxer.

Pros and Cons of Generating a Java Program from a Schema

Generating an XML Document from Java Classes.

Castor XML.

Pros and Cons of Generating XML Documents from Java Classes.

SOAP Encoding.

Summary.

16. Principles of Schema Languages.

Introduction.

Schemas as Syntactic Constraints.

Checking Unexpected Documents.

What Happens If We Neglect Schemas?

Desiderata for Schema Languages.

Schemas as Data Models.

Documents as Character Strings.

Documents as Trees.

Documents as Data Compliant with Schemas.

Documents as Information for Web Applications.

Desiderata for Schema Languages.

Interworking with Other Software.

Interworking with Programming Languages.

Relational Databases.

Desiderata for Schema Languages.

General-Purpose Schema Languages.

DTD.

W3C XML Schema.

RELAX NG.

Schematron.

Special-Purpose Schema Languages.

RDF Schema.

RELAX Namespace.

Summary.

Appendix A.

Appendix B. Useful Links and Books.

XML.

General.

Software.

Java.

Platform and SDK.

Web Applications.

Database.

Messaging.

Security.

Web Services.

General.

Software.

Standards.

Books.

Java.

XML/SGML.

Web Services.

Other Topics.

Appendix C. XML-Related Standardization Activities.

XML Core.

Namespace.

XML Fragment Interchange.

XML Inclusions.

XML Infoset.

XML Tools.

XPath.

XML Pointer, XML Base, and XML Linking.

Extensible Stylesheet Language.

Schema Languages.

XML Schema.

RELAX NG.

Schematron.

APIs.

Document Object Model.

Simple API for XML.

XML Security.

XML Signature.

XML Encryption.

Platform for Privacy Preferences Project.

Web Services.

XML Protocol (SOAP).

Web Services Description Language.

Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration.

Java Specification Requests.

Other Topics.

Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning.

Wireless Markup Language.

XHTML.

XML Query.

Appendix D. JDBC Primer.

Introduction.

JDBC Package.

Loading a JDBC Driver.

Connecting to a Database.

Submitting a Query.

Using a Connection Pool.

Index. 0201770040T05092002

Read More Show Less

Preface

When we had the opportunity to write a book on XML in February 1998, which was just after we had released the first XML4J Parser from IBM’s alphaWorks Web site, we discussed what we could achieve through publishing a book. We immediately concluded that a book on how to develop programs that deal with XML as data would be the most needed and that we could contribute through our experience in writing the parser. Several XML books were on the market, but most of them were either about the specifications or about creating XML documents. Few of them described how to write programs with XML as the input and output data format. Because Java was the implementation language of XML4J Parser and because many features (such as built-in Unicode character support) make XML and Java a perfect match, Java was a natural choice as the programming language. More importantly, Java was becoming the mainstream language for server-side programming. We believe that the first edition of the book satisfied, at least to a certain extent, the needs of developers who desperately needed to know the potential and limitations of these two emerging technologies and how they can be best applied to real-world situations.

We have the same goals in this edition with more new technologies—to show how the emerging technologies around XML and Java such as DOM Level 2, SAX2, XSLT, J2EE, XML Schema, and Web services—can be combined to solve real-world problems, and to discuss how these technologies will change the way future e-Business applications will be developed. The first edition of the book was not an introduction or a reference to each technology, and neither is the second edition. Each of these topics is worth an entire book. We do not list all the features of these technologies. Instead, we explain why you should be interested in them and how you can apply them to your problem by showing real-world examples.

This book has two parts. The first half covers basic tools for dealing with XML in Java. Here we concentrate only on the solid, stable technologies. XML technologies that were not W3C Recommendations at the time of writing are deliberately not included. That the beginning chapters are about “basic” technologies does not mean that these chapters are introductory. It simply means that these technologies and tools are the absolute minimum you need to understand in order to develop an XML-based application. Seasoned developers who trust only basic and proven tools will also find these chapters useful, because we covered a lot of programming techniques and hints for making the most of these tools. In the later chapters, on the other hand, we include emerging technologies, such as SOAP and Web services, that we believe are crucial for future e-Business solutions. Those who are looking for new technologies for their next projects and need to understand the potential and limitations of these technologies will find the chapters in the later chapters particularly useful.

All the sample programs in the book are available on the accompanying CD-ROM. Each sample has its own Readme file that describes how to set up and run it. It is our strong belief that knowledge about new software technologies can be acquired only through playing with them—running them, changing the configurations and modifying lines of code, and rerunning them to see the effects. We recommend that readers try the samples on the CD-ROM as much as possible. We made every effort to ensure that the samples are complete and run on most, if not all, platforms that support the latest Java runtimes. Any updates to the contents of the book can be downloaded from the publisher’s Web site at http://www.awl.com/cseng/.

0201770040P05092002

Read More Show Less

Introduction

When we had an opportunity of writing a book on XML in February 1998, which was just after we had released the first XML4J Parser from IBM’s alphaWorks Web site, we discussed what we could achieve through publishing a book. We immediately came to a conclusion that a book on how to develop programs that deal with XML as data would be the most needed and we could contribute through our experience in writing the parser. There were several XML books on the market but most of them were either about the specifications themselves or about creating XML documents. Very few of them described how to write programs with XML as input and output data format. Because Java was the implementation language of XML4J Parser, and also because there are many features that make XML and Java are a perfect match such as built-in Unicode character support, it was a natural choice to pick Java as the programming language. More importantly, Java was becoming the mainstream language for server side programming. We believe that the first edition of the book satisfied, at least to a certain extent, the needs of developers who desperately needed to know the potential and limitations of these two emerging technologies and how they can be best applied to real world situations.

We keep the same goals in this edition with more new technologies—to show how the emerging technologies around XML and Java, such as DOM Level 2, SAX2, XSLT, J2EE, XML Schema, and Web Services, are combined to solve real world problems and to discuss how these technologies will change the way the future e-Business applications will be developed. The first edition of the book was never an introduction nor a reference to eachtechnology piece, and the second edition is not, either. Each of these topics is worth an entire book. We do not list all the features of these technologies. Instead, we explain why you should be interested in them and how you can apply them to your problem by showing real world examples.

This book has two parts. Part I covers basic tools for dealing with XML in a Java environment. Here we concentrate on the solid, stable technologies only. XML technologies that were not W3C recommendations at the time of writing, are not included deliberately. That Part I is about “basic” technologies does not mean that these chapters are introductory. It simply means that these technologies and tools are the absolute minimum that you need to understand in order to develop an XML-based application. Seasoned developers who trust only basic and proven tools will also find these chapters useful, as we covered a lot of programming techniques and hints for making the most out of these tools. In Part II, on the other hand, we included emerging technologies such as SOAP and Web Services, which we believe crucial for the future e-business solutions. For those who are looking for new technologies for their next projects and need to understand the potential and limitations of these technologies, chapters in Part II will be particularly useful.

All the sample programs in the book are available in the accompanying CD-ROM. Each sample has its own README file that describes how to set up and run it. It is our strong belief that knowledge on new software technologies can be acquired only through playing with them—running them, changing the configurations and modifying lines of code and re-running them to see the effects. We recommend that the readers try the samples in the CD-ROM as much as possible. We made every effort that the samples are complete and run on most, if not all, platforms that support the latest Java runtimes. Any updates on the contents of the book can be downloaded from the publisher’s Web site.



Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)