XML in a Nutshell [NOOK Book]

Overview

If you're a developer working with XML, you know there's a lot to know about XML, and the XML space is evolving almost moment by moment. But you don't need to commit every XML syntax, API, or XSLT transformation to memory; you only need to know where to find it. And if it's a detail that has to do with XML or its companion standards, you'll find it--clear, concise, useful, and well-organized--in the updated third edition of XML in a Nutshell.With XML in a Nutshell beside your ...

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XML in a Nutshell

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Overview

If you're a developer working with XML, you know there's a lot to know about XML, and the XML space is evolving almost moment by moment. But you don't need to commit every XML syntax, API, or XSLT transformation to memory; you only need to know where to find it. And if it's a detail that has to do with XML or its companion standards, you'll find it--clear, concise, useful, and well-organized--in the updated third edition of XML in a Nutshell.With XML in a Nutshell beside your keyboard, you'll be able to:

  • Quick-reference syntax rules and usage examples for the core XML technologies, including XML, DTDs, Xpath, XSLT, SAX, and DOM
  • Develop an understanding of well-formed XML, DTDs, namespaces, Unicode, and W3C XML Schema
  • Gain a working knowledge of key technologies used for narrative XML documents such as web pages, books, and articles technologies like XSLT, Xpath, Xlink, Xpointer, CSS, and XSL-FO
  • Build data-intensive XML applications
  • Understand the tools and APIs necessary to build data-intensive XML applications and process XML documents, including the event-based Simple API for XML (SAX2) and the tree-oriented Document Object Model (DOM)
This powerful new edition is the comprehensive XML reference. Serious users of XML will find coverage on just about everything they need, from fundamental syntax rules, to details of DTD and XML Schema creation, to XSLT transformations, to APIs used for processing XML documents. XML in a Nutshell also covers XML 1.1, as well as updates to SAX2 and DOM Level 3 coverage. If you need explanation of how a technology works, or just need to quickly find the precise syntax for a particular piece, XML in a Nutshell puts the information at your fingertips.Simply put, XML in a Nutshell is the critical, must-have reference for any XML developer.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449379049
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/23/2004
  • Series: In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 714
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

Elliotte Rusty Harold is an adjunct professor of computer science at Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, New York, where he lectures on object-oriented programming and XML. His Cafe con Leche Web site has become one of the most popular sites for information on XML. In addition, he is the author and coauthor of numerous books, the most recent of which are "The XML Bible" (John Wiley & Sons, 2001) and "XML in a Nutshell" (O'Reilly, 2002).
0321150406AB08272003

Means began his career as a software developer with Microsoft in 1988, joining the company at the age of 17. He is currently serving as President and CEO of Enterprise Web Machines, a South Carolina-based Internet software product and services company.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Pt. I XML Concepts
1 Introducing XML 3
2 XML Fundamentals 12
3 Document Type Definitions (DTDs) 27
4 Namespaces 60
5 Internationalization 72
Pt. II Narrative-Centric Documents
6 XML as a Document Format 89
7 XML on the Web 102
8 XSL Transformations (XSLT) 136
9 XPath 154
10 XLinks 175
11 XPointers 190
12 Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 202
13 XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO) 217
14 Resource Directory Description Language (RDDL) 234
Pt. III Data-Centric XML
15 XML as a Data Format 243
16 XML Schemas 254
17 Programming Models 287
18 Document Object Model (DOM) 296
19 Simple API for XML (SAX) 316
Pt. IV Reference
20 XML 1.0 Reference 335
21 Schemas Reference 372
22 XPath Reference 416
23 XSLT Reference 430
24 DOM Reference 458
25 SAX Reference 513
26 Character Sets 531
Index 589
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2005

    THE definitive XML reference

    In my opinion, XML In A Nutshell is the definitive reference for XML syntax and use. I¿ve had this book on my desk since the first edition. Now at edition 3, this book just keeps getting better and better. It covers virtually every XML standard, provides lots of examples, and has a character set reference that I couldn¿t live without. Highly recommended for all XML questions. Like many of the ¿Nutshell¿ books, this book starts off with a lot of informational chapters, designed to give a high level view of many XML-related technologies. These chapters, while a bit vague in parts, are still very good and will answer most general questions. However, when you have a deeper question, the reference chapters in the second half of the book really shine. The reference material is well organized, making information easy to find and digest. Personally, my favorite chapters are the XPath Reference and the XSLT Reference sections. Anyone who works with XML on a daily basis should have this book at their desk. This is the one book to have on XML.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2005

    XML in a Nutshell

    The organization of the book is great. Very useful and well written. It provides quick-reference syntax rules and usage examples for the core XML technologies, including XML, DTDs, Xpath, XSLT, SAX, and DOM. Develop an understanding of well-formed XML, DTDs, namespaces, Unicode, and W3C XML Schema. This new edition is the comprehensive XML reference. Serious users of XML will find coverage on just about everything they need, from fundamental syntax rules, to details of DTD and XML Schema creation, to XSLT transformations, to APIs used for processing XML documents. The initial chapter on SAX along with the reference chapter would give me a solid foundational base from which to work. If you need explanation of how a technology works, or just need to quickly find the precise syntax for a particular piece, XML in a Nutshell puts the information at your fingertips. I would recommend this book to someone interested in its topic. This book has earned a valued place on my reference shelf.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2004

    most will only need a subset

    How much XML do you need to know? Me, I read and write XML daily in my programs. But without having to support legacy data, I've found that I can use a very minimal subject to good effect. No mixed content, no attributes in tags, etc. So I can use SAX very easily. And I only need a small subset of this book. But chances are that you may not be in such an easy situation. You might have to transform XML data using XSLT. While conceptually simple, the details are complex. So the book's section on XSLT can be vital. Another usage context is when you have to do some kind of search within XML data. The purview of XPath, XPointer and XLink. More good stuff to lookup here for explanations. Harold writes fluently about XML. He has several other well received books on XML. So technically, you can rely on this book to get the details right. But few of you should need to know all of this book. XML has grown vastly, to serve increasingly different and specialised needs. The book tries to address the totality of these needs. So don't be intimidated if you see chapters that you are totally unaware of. I'm in the same boat as you, and so are many others.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2003

    Excellent reference

    Let me put it this way : I have the first edition, yet I just shelled out $36 for the second edition. 'Nuff said.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2002

    Honka Monka

    My bunny head is a cow. I ate cerial sixteen times in one evening once. Toots toots, bo bo goots. Im going to throw at your face some darts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2002

    Beautiful Reference

    The Nutshell series of books from O¿Reilly have a special section of my desk established for them; no other set of books condenses so much information for reference. This book is no exception to this fact.<P> Before I continue, please avoid buying an O¿Reilly Nutshell book expecting it to teach you about the topic it is intended for. As far as I¿ve worked with them, these books are not intended as a do-all be-all that other references want to be. The information introducing you to XML is sparse, so if you don¿t know anything about XML, get another book. I recommend XML: A Primer by Simon St. Laurent; it is an excellent learning tool, and though it doesn¿t go into all the detail the XML standard can go into (no book I¿ve found can do such), it provides the user with understanding of XML.<P> XML in a Nutshell is what I use when I¿ve forgotten how to use a certain aspect of XML detail. As a reference and a second book on XML, nothing comes close.<P>

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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