Yanks: The Epic Story of the American Army in World War I

( 4 )

Overview

In the perfect match of subject and author, John S. D. Eisenhower, a noted military historian, presents the definitive account of the birth of the modern Amer- ican army and its decisive role in World War I. With the help of his wife Joanne, Eisenhower captures the viewpoints of the actual participants, blending a narrative told from the perspective of top officers with the stories of average soldiers. Drawing on diaries and memoirs, he brings each engagement to life, from the initial planning to the actual ...
See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$18.01
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$23.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $15.21   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   
Yanks: The Epic Story of the American Army in World War I

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$15.99
BN.com price

Overview

In the perfect match of subject and author, John S. D. Eisenhower, a noted military historian, presents the definitive account of the birth of the modern Amer- ican army and its decisive role in World War I. With the help of his wife Joanne, Eisenhower captures the viewpoints of the actual participants, blending a narrative told from the perspective of top officers with the stories of average soldiers. Drawing on diaries and memoirs, he brings each engagement to life, from the initial planning to the actual battlefield experiences of soldiers whose exploits at Belleau Woods and along the Meuse-Argonne would become the stuff of legend.

Along the way, he shows how General Pershing and other leaders -- including George Marshall, Douglas MacArthur, George Patton, Billy Mitchell, and Peyton March -- transformed the American Expeditionary Force from a small, underequipped force into a strong, efficient, and effective army. Fast-paced, lively, and engaging, Yanks illuminates the central role of the American army in turning the tide in the biggest war the world had ever known.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
John Milton Cooper, Jr. The New York Times Book Review Eisenhower makes World War I memorable...Yanks illuminates how [World War I] in part shaped World War II and all the American wars of the 20th century.

Alan Gropman The Washington Times An outstanding account of the American combat effort in World War I...brilliantly organized [and] exceptionally well-written...Eisenhower tells a great story and he tells it well.

Stephen E. Ambrose author of Band of Brothers and The Wild Blue When John Eisenhower describes General Pershing and his staff on the ship taking his first contingent of Americans to France, he makes you feel you were there -- most of all wondering, as Pershing did, how all this was going to work. Finding out is what makes this such an enjoyable read.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Starting from near zero, the U.S. and Gen. John Pershing created a war-winning army in less than 18 months; veteran historian Eisenhower (Agent of Destiny, etc.) tells how they did it in this fast-paced narrative. A retired brigadier general in the army reserves, Eisenhower (writing here with spouse Joanne) presents the U.S. involvement in the war from the perspective of statesmen and generals. Even for combat color, he focuses primarily on senior officers: Douglas MacArthur and George Patton, with his insouciant courage under fire; George C. Marshall; and lesser-known figures like Charles Summerall, who threw a whole army's rear echelons into compound confusion in order to give the 1st Infantry Division a chance to capture Sedan in the war's final days. That kind of drive and energy was necessary given America's almost complete military unpreparedness. It took almost a year for the U.S. Army to put a single division of the American Expeditionary Force into battle. Without denying the administrative problems and the casualties caused by inexperience and improvisation, Eisenhower stresses the Americans' high learning curves at all levels. He argues as well that Pershing was an effective commander even in the Argonne campaign, the one most often cited as bringing the AEF nearly to gridlock, making a remarkably clear presentation of that confusing combat. Eisenhower sympathizes with Pershing's belief that the armistice was a mistake, that even a few days more might have convinced the Germans they had, in fact, been defeated in the field. It remains an arguable position, but the AEF emerges from these pages as the decisive instrument of an incomplete victory. (June 4) Forecast: The Eisenhower name, both presidential and military historical (John S.D. is the son of Dwight David), will draw readers to this title, which is suitable for generalists and buffs alike. The latter, however, will be more likely to take this blow-by-blow account all the way to the register. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
This history focuses entirely on the challenges, victories, sacrifices (320,500 casualties), and long-term consequences of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) in Europe during World War I. According to Eisenhower (brigadier general, ret.; Agent of Destiny: The Life and Times of General Winfield Scott), the AEF was originally meant to be amalgamated with the Allied armies in Europe, but through the stubborn insistence of the Wilson administration and Gen. "Black" Jack Pershing, the Americans fought under their own colors. This well-written work demonstrates how a small, ill-equipped force grew into an awesome fighting machine and was led to victory after victory (Marne, Ch teau-Thierry, Belleau Wood, Soissons, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne) by a gifted, opportunistic corps of officers eager to prove themselves and their units. Battlefield accounts are enlivened with evocative recollections from the diaries and memoirs of officers and doughboys alike. Eisenhower contends that the AEF's contributions in France ranged from cowering the Central Powers into submission in 1918 to serving as an indispensable military model for World War II. This soundly researched effort, which would have benefited only from the inclusion of AEF engagement maps, includes Eisenhower's explanatory endnotes as an extra bonus. Recommended for all general and academic libraries. John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743223850
  • Publisher: Free Press
  • Publication date: 5/21/2002
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,463,131
  • Product dimensions: 0.90 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author

A retired brigadier general in the Army Reserves, John S. D. Eisenhower served as U.S. ambassador to Belgium and is one of the nation's leading military historians. He is the author of three seminal works of military history or biography: So Far from God, on the Mexican-American War; The Bitter Woods, on the Battle of the Bulge; and, most recently, Agent of Destiny, a life of Winfield Scott.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


AUTHOR'S NOTE

"The history of the Victorian Age," writes Lytton Strachey in his Preface to Eminent Victorians, "will never be written: we know too much about it." That paradoxical and somewhat arresting statement serves as Strachey's excuse for selecting four lives to depict an entire age of British history, but it applies to any subject on which mountains of material have been written.

The First World War, often referred to as the Great War, certainly falls into that category. Too much is known about that vast conflict to permit one book to cover the entire war in anything but a textbook fashion. The "explorer of the past," to continue with Strachey, "will row out over that great ocean of material, and lower down into it...a little bucket, which will bring up to the light of day some characteristic specimen."

With that idea in mind, I have not attempted to write a comprehensive story of the Great War. Instead I have focused on the American Expeditionary Force (AEF), commanded by General John J. Pershing. In describing the inception of the AEF in early 1917 and its subsequent development and employment until the war's end in late 1918, I have not attempted to give a rounded picture of the whole war, which includes the actions of many nations on many fronts. Nevertheless, the story of the AEF and how it fit into the general scheme of the war is worth a study in itself.

The saga of the AEF is not, on the whole, a cheery one. The overseas experiences of the American troops -- "doughboys" -- bore little relationship to the rousing patriotic songs such as George M. Cohan's "Over There," or to the parades and banners. It entailed arduous duties, performed in the wet, the cold, sometimes the heat, with death always lurking, mostly in the front line infantry battalions but elsewhere as well. There was heroism, but there was also cowardice. At first there was ignorance of the job to be done -- "innocence" might be a better word. Yet the end result was inspiring. A great many people pulled together to attain a great accomplishment.

In a way, the story of the AEF in the Great War is part of my background, perhaps something I needed to put on paper in order to work it out of my system. I was born in an Army family slightly less than four years after the last gun was fired in the Meuse-Argonne; my first vivid memories are those of trudging over the battlefields with my father, Major Dwight D. Eisenhower, and my mother. During 1928 and 1929 my father was a member of General Pershing's American Battle Monuments Commission, with offices in Paris. One of his tasks was to draft the official Guide to the American Battlefields in France. The end result was a remarkable book; it remains today the best available guide for the student of the war to follow. The final edition was not published until 1938, and I have no idea what proportion of my father's original words survived. I also have no idea of how the study of the terrain in northern France helped him in later campaigns across the same territory fifteen years later. But I know that accompanying him on his many tours around the territory made a lasting impression on me. At age six, I was even privileged to shake the hand of the Great Man himself, John J. Pershing!

It is not surprising that, as a youngster, I viewed the Great War in a romantic fashion. Heroic charges, reduction of fearsome enemy machine gun nests, the roar of artillery, the exploits of the air aces -- those were my boyhood fantasies, based on true stories but far from the grim truth.

Others have viewed the AEF and its role in the Great War much differently. Some have thought it unnecessary; others have succumbed to excessive disillusionment over the disparity between the patriotic mouthings of our propagandists and the grisly facts of the Argonne or of Château Thierry. The latter views, when carried to the extreme, are no more right nor wrong than my childhood concepts. They are just viewed from different angles, both extreme.

The purpose of this book, therefore, is to strike a balance, to examine how the AEF came about, to describe the gargantuan efforts needed to create it, supply it, train it, and fight it, and in so doing to show how the modern American Army was born. Since many of my sources are personal memoirs written by survivors, I have not dwelt at length on the immense tragedies felt by so many families. Nevertheless, it is my hope that this single, modest volume will provide some perspective on one of the truly pivotal events in American history.

John S. D. Eisenhower

Copyright © 2001 by John S. D. Eisenhower

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

List of Maps

Author's Note

BOOK ONE

CREATING THE AEF

Prologue
ONE A Visit from Papa Joffre

TWO A Nation at War

THREE The Selection of General Pershing

FOUR The Yanks Arrive

FIVE Organizing the AEF

SIX The Supreme War Council

BOOK TWO

APPRENTICESHIP: THE OPENING BATTLES

SEVEN Baptism of Fire

EIGHT The Calm Before the Storm

NINE Unified Command at Last!

TEN "I Will Not Be Coerced"

ELEVEN The Big Red One at Cantigny

TWELVE The 2d Division at Belleau Wood

THIRTEEN The Rock of the Marne

FOURTEEN Soissons -- The Turning Point

BOOK THREE

THE AEF FIGHTS INDEPENDENTLY:

ST. MIHIEL AND THE MEUSE-ARGONNE

FIFTEEN St. Mihiel -- Dress Rehearsal

SIXTEEN The Race Against Time

SEVENTEEN Montfaucon -- Ominous Victory

EIGHTEEN Argonne

NINETEEN Feelers for Peace

TWENTY First Army Comes of Age

TWENTY-ONE The Windup

TWENTY-TWO The Railroad Car at Compiègne

TWENTY-THREE The End of the AEF

Epilogue

APPENDIX Mobilization

Notes

Bibliography

Acknowledgments

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2011

    A good account of the AEF in World War 1

    Well written but the author seems more engrossed with General Pershing than with the overall US war effort.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2014

    Halli

    She appeared suddenly." So so. This is where you headed after abusing me. Huh."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2014

    Fae

    Fu.ck me with your tongue! *she screamed.*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)