The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium by Robert Lacey, Danny Danziger |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium

The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium

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by Robert Lacey, Danny Danziger
     
 

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As the Shadow of the Millennium Descended Across England and Christendom, it Seemed as if the World was About to End. Actually, it was Only the Beginning... Welcome to the Year 1000. This is What Life was Like. How clothes were fastened in a world without buttons, p.10 The rudiments of medieval brain surgery, p.124 The first millennium's Bill Gates, p.192 How

Overview

As the Shadow of the Millennium Descended Across England and Christendom, it Seemed as if the World was About to End. Actually, it was Only the Beginning... Welcome to the Year 1000. This is What Life was Like. How clothes were fastened in a world without buttons, p.10 The rudiments of medieval brain surgery, p.124 The first millennium's Bill Gates, p.192 How dolphins forecasted weather, p.140 The recipe for a medieval form of Viagra, p.126 Body parts a married woman had to forfeit if she committed adultery, p.171 The fundamental rules of warfare, p.154 How fried and crushed black snails could improve your health, p.127 And much more...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316511575
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
04/01/2000
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
208,441
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.75(d)

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Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bravo, Messrs. Lacey and Danziger! An enjoyable read for any age interested in history. Rather than present a dry, erudite history text, the authors have fashioned a lively, page-turner which deals with most aspects of Medieval life--including the naughty bits ;) Since we can't have a 'Wayback Machine', this book is the best we can do to place ourselves in the boots of the typical Joannes Doe. I use it in my History classes and reread it when I need a refresher course in what good scholarship should be. And it's in Paperback, too!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for my Economics portfolio. My mom recommended it to me and I took it, even though I didn't think it fit the requirements. I got started reading and found it hard to put down because we were talking about the same thing in English class. I got to the chapter on the economics (May - Wealth and Wool) and I noticed that the Anglo-Saxons, back in the year 1000, had the same type of system we have now. They had mints, where their silver alloy coins were made, they had a type of free market, and they traded with other countries. I found it interesting that the government would institute a new coin every few years, and the old coins would become invalid. I think that would be an excellent way to confuse counterfeiters. I liked this book and would recommend it to anyone interested in the Middle Ages.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book very interesting. It made me understand how 'enlightened' Anglo Saxon England was. It's well written, and in a language even a layman can follow.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most history books tend to be a bit bland and recite facts more than tell stories. This one is different. Because of the descriptive words and humor used by the authors, this book was more enjoyable to read than many fictional novels.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was very interesting to read, and was a GREAT find.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book gives great insight into the lives of the people of ancient England. It displays facts clearly and makes it interesting so that it is not only informative, but also enjoyable. An outstanding book that even a teenager would love.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although useful for reports, this book is nothing to delve into. Unless your history textbook has you on the edge of your seat, getting through this book will be a challenge.