Year for Kiko

Year for Kiko

by Joung Kim, Joung Un Kim
     
 
Kiko becomes the March wind and the summer firefly, plants a seed in May, jumps in the fallen leaves of October, plays hide-and-seek with the harvest moon, and catches snowflakes. As the months pass, Kiko welcomes each new season and finds ways to celebrate the changes it brings. In free verse and with lovingly painted illustrations, the changing seasons are captured

Overview

Kiko becomes the March wind and the summer firefly, plants a seed in May, jumps in the fallen leaves of October, plays hide-and-seek with the harvest moon, and catches snowflakes. As the months pass, Kiko welcomes each new season and finds ways to celebrate the changes it brings. In free verse and with lovingly painted illustrations, the changing seasons are captured through the eyes of a little girl.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Tamara Hundley
Kiko experiences the changing seasons as the months go by and she discovers how these changes effect her and the things around her. She is outside during each season, learning how changes effect her feelings and activities. Kiko learns that she can have fun and enjoy every season. She learns to enjoy life in the snow, rain, sunshine, cloudy days, and even at night. This book is full of bright, colorful illustrations that draw the reader into the seasons and months they represent. This book would be helpful in a classroom setting because it teaches children to be creative - to realize that there are wonderful, exciting things to do throughout the year and in all types of weather. It's an enjoyable book with lots of energy.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1An account of a child's discovery of the natural elements. Each month, Kiko is shown experiencing and reacting to something new in her surroundings, as she takes delight in everyday occurrences. The premise is promising, but it isn't successfully executed. The text is overwritten and lacks a smooth rhythm ("January snow is falling./Kiko catches the snowflakes./She slips in the snow./The snowflakes catch Kiko"). The illustrations are attractive, but bland. Done in acrylic paints, each picture provides a strong sense of mood and clearly expresses Kiko's feelings. Children may have difficulty identifying the girl's petsometimes it looks like a dog, sometimes a goat. Overall, this is not a memorable picture book.Dawn Ibey, Vancouver Public Library, Canada
Kirkus Reviews
Wolff (A Weed Is a Seed, 1996, etc.) takes readers through the calendar with a month-by-month list of a small girl's solitary outdoor activities during the year.

Each of 12 spreads celebrates a month as experienced by Kiko, a girl of about five. The short pieces of text are simple and childlike, and most provide a fresh slant on ordinary topics and observations: "Kiko's window is frosted white. Kiko draws a smile with her finger. The smile melts the ice." These unexpectedly poetic notions make the book special—and more than a vehicle for showing the seasons. The illustrator is most successful in her portrayals of fields and forests, with layers of brush work and visible strokes that are sometimes almost pointillistic. It lends a lush quality to the landscapes, and although Kiko is less gracefully depicted, her postures and gestures keep pace with the quiet exuberance of the text.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395773963
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/29/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.36(w) x 8.34(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
170L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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