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Year of the Hunter
     

Year of the Hunter

by Czeslaw Milosz
 

Like Native Realm, Czeslaw Milosz's autobiography written thirty years earlier, A Year of the Hunter is a "search for self-definition." A diary of one year in the Nobel laureate's life, 1987-88, it concerns itself as much with his experience of remembering as with the actual events that shape his days. Shuttling between observations of the present and

Overview

Like Native Realm, Czeslaw Milosz's autobiography written thirty years earlier, A Year of the Hunter is a "search for self-definition." A diary of one year in the Nobel laureate's life, 1987-88, it concerns itself as much with his experience of remembering as with the actual events that shape his days. Shuttling between observations of the present and reconstructions of the past, he attempts to answer the unstated question: Given his poet's personality and his historical circumstances, has he managed to live his life decently?

From Milosz's thoughts on the Catholic Church and his conversations with Pope John Paul II to his impatience with sixties American radicalism and his reflections on the avant-garde, A Year of the Hunter brims with caustic wit and shrewd observations about people, places, politics, and literature. Milosz also gives us a deeply personal portrait of life in pre-war Poland in which he charts his conflicting feelings about Poland and the Polish people.

Lively in tone, impressive in its intellectual breadth, A Year of the Hunter offers a splendid introduction to Milosz for new readers and, for those who know his essays and poetry, the pleasure of watching him master another genre.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Deeply pessimistic yet oddly invigorating, this diary covering 12 months of Milosz's life in 1987-1988 is a disarmingly candid self-portrait of the Nobel poet, novelist and essayist. Milosz, born in Lithuania in 1911, also recollects the German occupation of Poland during WW II, where he worked as a writer for resistance journals. He articulates his philosophical rejection of both communism and capitalism and voices doubts about his poetry, life's meaning and an afterlife. He mourns the death in 1986 of his wife of nearly 50 years and minutely dissects their relationship. Besides discussing numerous modern Polish poets and novelists, Milosz, professor of Slavic languages and literature at UC Berkeley, offers shrewd comments on an enormous range of writers, from Beckett to Balzac. This lively journal shows Milosz grappling with his thoughts on evil, death, sex, vanity, music and spirituality. (Aug.)
Library Journal
Memoirs from the Nobel prize-winning poet 30 years after Native Life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374524449
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
10/31/1995
Pages:
291
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.68(d)

Meet the Author

Czeslaw Milosz (1911-2004) was the winner of the 1978 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1980 Nobel Prize in Literature. His last book was To Begin Where I Am (FSG, 2001). Many of his works have been translated into English, including, Beginning with My Streets (FSG, 1992), The Year of the Hunter (FSG, 1994), Road-side Dog (FSG, 1998) Milosz's ABC's (FSG, 2001) and To Begin Where I Am (FSG, 2001).

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