Year of the Panda

Year of the Panda

4.6 3
by Miriam Schlein, Kam Mak
     
 

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Daxiong mao is rare and mysterious, like a god, living in the midst of the mountains.Strange things are happening on Lu Yi's farm. First, some men from the Chinese government ask Lu Yi's father to sell the property that has belonged to the family for generations. Then a giant panda appears in a neighbor's field, A rare occurrence, given the farm's distance from the

Overview

Daxiong mao is rare and mysterious, like a god, living in the midst of the mountains.Strange things are happening on Lu Yi's farm. First, some men from the Chinese government ask Lu Yi's father to sell the property that has belonged to the family for generations. Then a giant panda appears in a neighbor's field, A rare occurrence, given the farm's distance from the high-mountain bamboo forests that pandas inhabit.Lu Yi has a feeling that the two mysteries are somehow connected. And before long, an orphaned baby panda he finds in the' woods provides an answer. As the boy nurses the helpless animal back to health, he begins an adventure that may, well change his entire future.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Lu Yi and his father are collecting firewood on the mountainside when they discover a baby daxiong mao (giant panda) whose mother has been killed. Lu Yi plans to raise the panda, Su Lin, until it can protect itself. While he is caring for the animal, a messenger from the Chinese government visits Lu Yi's town. He explains that the giant panda is an endangered species, and that the townspeople and the government must work together to help it survive. When Lu Yi learns that the panda will starve if set free because the bamboo on the mountainside is dying off, he reluctantly tells the man about Su Lin. Together they bring the panda to a rescue center where Lu Yi learns how the species is being protected. The clear, concise narrative makes it clear that decisions about how to save the panda are not always straightforward. Brief yet thought-provoking, this sensitively written novel is enhanced by Mak's stirring pencil drawings. Ages 8-12. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
Lu Yi wonders why a daxiong mao (giant panda) has come down from the mist-shrouded mountains. Then he and his father discover a dead panda who has left behind a baby. Lu Yi rescues the orphan, and with the help of his family, cares for it. One day, a messenger arrives in their remote village in China with the story of the pandas' plight. The bamboo that the pandas feed on has died, as it does every 60 years, and, as it takes two to three years for the new shoots to grow sufficiently, there is a famine. The pandas have journeyed to the farms seeking food. When the messenger hears of the orphaned panda, he makes arrangments for Lu Yi and his charge to go to the Panda Rescue Center. There Lu Yi comes to understand the extent of the effort required to preserve the endangered daxiong mao and their habitat. This is a well-crafted, absorbing story. That it will also inform readers of the plight of the giant panda and of the efforts to insure its survival is an added bonus. The full-page black-and-white drawings add to the appeal. --Susan Middleton, LaJolla Country Day School, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780833590916
Publisher:
San Val
Publication date:
09/28/1992
Pages:
83
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.66(h) x 0.45(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Lu Yi opened his eyes.

Something was wrong.

He knew it right away.

Usually, it was quiet here on the farm. The voices of his mother and father -- of course he knew these. Mr. Po, or Ho Yen, or Mrs. Chen, who lived on farms close by, he knew their voices, too. So well, they were like part of him.

But this was different. These were the voices of strangers, talking very loud with his father.

He leaned on one elbow and listened.

Usually, Lu Yi hated to get up in the morning. Most days his mother had to call him two or three times.

But today hejumped up and looked out. There were two men he had never seen before. Strangers were rare here, where he lived, in the shadow of the great, snow-covered mountains.

Who were they? And what did they want?

Lu Yi sat in the corner of the courtyard and listened.

He heard: "The government will not force you. They are asking you to move. For the reasons I have explained. "

"It is your right to say no, "the other man added.

Lu Yi's father looked at his mother. "Then we say no."

His mother nodded. Then the two strangers walked off.

"Are we moving, Father?"

Lu Yi looked around. The field of wheat. The vegetable garden. The beehives for honey. He was born here. He could not imagine living someplace else.

"Don't worry, son. I told the man no.

"How could we move?" said Lu Yi. "This land is our family's. It is yours now. Before that, it was your father's. "

I. . .and after my time, " said his father, "it will be your land. Time now to work. And for you, school.

His father did not sound worried. Still, later on, hesaw his father talking excitedly to Mr. Po.

Yi knew that sometimes his father tried hard not to seem troubled when , in fact, he was. Lu Yi had the feeling this was one of those times. He also knew it was no use asking any more questions right now.

The Year of the Panda. Copyright © by Miriam Schlein. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Miriam Schlein is the acclaimed author of numerous books for children, including the classic stories of motherly love The Way Mothers Are and Just like Me.

Kam Mak grew up in New York City's Chinatown. He earned his bachelor of fine arts degree from the School of Visual Arts, and since then he has illustrated book jackets for numerous publishers and taught painting at the Fashion Institute of Technology.

He has also illustrated The Moon of the Monarch Butterflies by Jean Craighead George, The Year of the Panda by Miriam Schlein, and The Dragon Prince by Laurence Yep. Kam Mak lives in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife, son, and daughter.

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Year of the Panda 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Jayway More than 1 year ago
Read the Year of the Panda. A funny, exciting book by Miriam Schlein. A book you don't want to put down. I learned about the daxiong mao that lived in China. I also learned how the pandas lived before the people moved into the village. It was a good book, but it leaves some mystery at the end. I would read it anyways. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes to read about animals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this book, not only do you find many interesting facts about pandas, but it makes a great adventure book too! A boy finds a baby panda whose mother had been killed. As he 'adopts' the baby, he finds out why pandas are endangered and how the government is trying to help them. If you donate money to the WWF (World Wildlife Fund) you may be able to help the Giant Pandas too!