Year's Best SF 17

Year's Best SF 17

4.3 6
by David G. Hartwell
     
 

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The Year’s Best SF 17 is a showcase of the best short form science fiction of 2011, selected by World Fantasy Award winners David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, two of the most respected editors in the field of speculative fiction.  Like the previous sixteen volumes of the series that has been called “the finest modern science fiction writing,

Overview

The Year’s Best SF 17 is a showcase of the best short form science fiction of 2011, selected by World Fantasy Award winners David Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer, two of the most respected editors in the field of speculative fiction.  Like the previous sixteen volumes of the series that has been called “the finest modern science fiction writing,” The Year’s Best SF 17 features stories from some of the brightest lights in sf—including Gregory Benford (Beyond Human), Nancy Kress (Beggars in Spain), James Morrow (The Philosopher’s Apprentice), Michael Swanwick (The Dragons of Babel) and Neil Gaiman (American Gods) —as well as electrifying short stories from exciting newcomers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062035875
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/29/2012
Series:
Year's Best SF Series, #17
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
1,145,135
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.30(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

David G. Hartwell is a senior editor of Tor/Forge Books. His doctorate is in Comparative Medieval Literature. He is the proprietor of Dragon Press, publisher and bookseller, which publishes The New York Review of Science Fiction, and the president of David G. Hartwell, Inc. He is the author of Age of Wonders and the editor of many anthologies, including The Dark Descent, The World Treasury of Science Fiction, The Hard SF Renaissance, The Space Opera Renaissance, and a number of Christmas anthologies, among others. Recently he co-edited his fifteenth annual paperback volume of Year's Best SF, and co-edited the ninth Year's Best Fantasy. John Updike, reviewing The World Treasury of Science Fiction in The New Yorker, characterized him as a "loving expert." He is on the board of the IAFA, is co-chairman of the board of the World Fantasy Convention, and an administrator of the Philip K. Dick Award. He has won the Eaton Award, the World Fantasy Award, and has been nominated for the Hugo Award forty times to date, winning as Best Editor in 2006, 2008, and 2009.

Kathryn Cramer is a writer, critic, and anthologist, and was coeditor of the Year's Best Fantasy and Year's Best SF series. A consulting editor at Tor Books, she won a World Fantasy Award for her anthology The Architecture of Fear.

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Year's Best SF 17 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thank you, Seth. Actually, a close friend of mine wrote those reviews. I agree with a lot of what he said, but some of it I do not. <p> I feel the need to say that I am impressed greatly by your creativity. You are a very talented writer, and though there are many grammatical errors in your pieces, or non-present punctuation marks, your work is actually quite good. Very interesting. Your previous story captured my attention. It was slightly difficult to follow, but then again, I was tired whilst endulging myself with the words. This story, in a vague sense, actually reminds me of Rick Riordan's writing&ndash; personal to the point where it is humourous. I do not favour vulgar language, but including the narrator's thoughts in the text like a normal senetence lets the reader connect and find humour in the story. I find this addition to be a sort of "topping off" gesture, and I like it. You are very good. Do keep practicing, and your writing could become very great indeed. <p> I will not, however, give you my full name, though it gratifies me most immensely that you like my story so much. I am but an imaginitive fourteen-year-old, you see, who loves writing and showing people the ideas in her brain. o.o Thanks. You're pretty good. <p> If you have a reply, do post it at the result beneath the ending of your story. I would enjoy conversing with you and exchanging feedback, but only if your consent was also included. Thank you. <p> ~Call me Skylar.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bl<_>ackest of Cr<_>ow. By &#167&#1108&#1026 [seth]<p> The story is below my feedback here. First off i would like to thank two people! One being the reviewer, at poilu result one, who gave me honest feedback about my story. He/she took time to actually write a serious review about my story. I hope this next story will not make you want to stop before finishing the story. Anyone willing to give honest feedback can put it at the results my stories are on, because i like reading peoples feedback. One thing i would ask is tat instead of reprimanding me on everything i did wrong and not saying anythinh i did good, maybe you could do all of both. I will change how i write my stories if i get negative feedback, but if i dont get any positive i might change what i do good about writing.<p> The second person i would like to thank is; the person who wrote the london street rats. If this is the same person that gave me feedback well doubly thanks, but i really admire your writing. I feel like i should get your real full name so i can look for your books when im an adult. Yes i think your writing is that good. I try to please everyone but some people you cant please. You however held almost everyone who voted for more than one person. Thank you! And now to my story:<p> 2:00 pm Gresham OR june 17, 2014<p> "Yeah, yeah" i muttered under my breath. God i hate my parents. They are always onto me about doing this and that. Its always, "Oh Jack do this" or "Oh jack dont forget to do that!" Man its irritating. Sometimes it really makes me want to-<br> Wham! My head slamed to the side. "What was that jack!?" My mom said... well more like screamed, into my ear. "Did i hear you backtalking me!?" She yelled.<br> "No mom." I said, but what i really thought was "I swear if you lay your filthy hands on me i will call the cops."<br> "What was that? I couldnt quit here you!" My mom yelled.<br> "No mom!" I said louder through my clenched teeth. Da<_>mn what is she de<_>af? I know she hears me, she just wants to get me to say it again to humiliate me or something. Its kind of irritating.<br> "Then get outside now! I want every weed pulled before you walk back through these doors." She yelled as she pushed me out the back door.<br> Oh great pulling weeds. My least favorite job. My mom has been a little... on the edge i guess you could say, ever since my dad had gotten a new job that makes him work a night shift everyday even on the weekends. My mom however works day shifts moneday through friday at some place downtown.<br> I looked around our yard. Our yard is huge. Weve got a pool and a tramboline in it. I walked over to the pool wishing i could just get in even though it is only 68 degrees outside. I leaned forward and stared at my reflection. I have hazel eyes, brownish blonde hair, chiped teeth due to me grinding them in my sleep (ha! My parents always say theyre stressed!), and my slightly big nose, im not exactly what you would call hansome. One good thing about me is my intelligence. Im a freshman in highschool and already have ta higher IQ than an adult graduating from Ha<_>rverd Un<_>iversity.<br> A loud Caw broke my train of thought. I looked up to see a crow fly over my head and perch itself on top of the net of the trampoline. It turned its ugly head towords me and i couldve sworn it looked directly into my eyes, with those beady eyes it has, before it took off.<p> I know its starting off slow but im going to get more into it at the next res. ~ Seth