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Year's Best SF 6 [NOOK Book]

Overview

Get Ready To Expand Your Mind...

Acclaimed editor and anthologist David G. Hartwell is back with the sixth annual collection of the year's most impressive, ...

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Year's Best SF 6

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Overview

Get Ready To Expand Your Mind...

Acclaimed editor and anthologist David G. Hartwell is back with the sixth annual collection of the year's most impressive, thought-provoking, and just plain great science fiction.

Year's Best SF 6 includes contributions from the greatest stars of the field as well as remarkable newcomers -- galaxies and into unexplored territory deep within your own soul.

Here are stories from:

  • Brian W. Aldiss
  • Stephen Baxter
  • David Brin
  • Nancy Kress
  • Ursula K. Le Guin
  • Robert Silverberg

and many more...

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Science fiction as short fiction is perhaps my favorite form of the literary genre, and David G. Hartwell's Year's Best series is a collection -- full of humor, drama, style, and surprises -- that never disappoints. Here are just some of the high points in the Sixth Edition.

Leading off the collection is Paul J. McAuley's "Reef," a tightly written, hard SF story about scientists and ambition, as an experiment in genetics lost for years sparks a desperate act of rebellion in an unlikely heroine.

An illustrious band of "dead" men wreak havoc at the dawn of the 31st century, vandalizing the tranquil paradise-on-earth mankind has finally created for himself in Robert Silverberg's "The Millennium Express." Global warming has been solved (way too well), a new Ice Age is threatening and the engineers are coming to blows in Norman Spinrad's excellent "New Ice Age or Just Cold Feet?" Stephen Dedman's "The Devotee" is a first-rate hard-boiled SF that would make Robert Parker proud. A superb story by one of my favorite authors, Ursula K. Le Guin, highlights this volume. "The Birthday of the World" is an anthropological story told from the point of view of a young girl, the Daughter of God, who in time will become God herself. Le Guin creates an intriguing new race -- their myths, beliefs, and legends. Their way of life and the things they hold sacred are beautifully illustrated. Ambition challenges faith as the old world dies and a new one is born out of a close encounter. Rounded out with fiction by Ken MacLeod, Joan Slonczewski, Greg Egan, Michael F. Flynn and Robert Sheckley, Year's Best SF 6 is, in a word, excellent. (Jim Killen)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061757815
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Series: Year's Best SF Series , #6
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 313,138
  • File size: 1,010 KB

Meet the Author

David G. Hartwell is a senior editor of Tor/Forge Books. His doctorate is in Comparative Medieval Literature. He is the proprietor of Dragon Press, publisher and bookseller, which publishes The New York Review of Science Fiction, and the president of David G. Hartwell, Inc. He is the author of Age of Wonders and the editor of many anthologies, including The Dark Descent, The World Treasury of Science Fiction, The Hard SF Renaissance, The Space Opera Renaissance, and a number of Christmas anthologies, among others. Recently he co-edited his fifteenth annual paperback volume of Year's Best SF, and co-edited the ninth Year's Best Fantasy. John Updike, reviewing The World Treasury of Science Fiction in The New Yorker, characterized him as a "loving expert." He is on the board of the IAFA, is co-chairman of the board of the World Fantasy Convention, and an administrator of the Philip K. Dick Award. He has won the Eaton Award, the World Fantasy Award, and has been nominated for the Hugo Award forty times to date, winning as Best Editor in 2006, 2008, and 2009.

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Read an Excerpt

Acclaimed editor and anthologist David G. Hartwell is back with the sixth annual collection of the year's most impressive, thought-provoking, and just plain great science fiction.

Last year I said that 1999 was one of the legendary years of the science fiction future, and we have lived through it. So of course was 2000, the turning point, the end of a thousand year period of growth and change and a significant moment in the Christian Era (AD). Well, the world didn't end, nor did the Second Coming come, nor the aliens in whatever form. Nor was there a socialist civilization in Boston, Massachusetts as envisioned by Edward Bellamy in Looking Backward in the 1880s. And now that that millennium is gone, we live in the Year One CE, and all the SF written about the 80s and 90s is just fiction—now robbed of most of its significant prophetic power—and must stand or fall as fiction, on the merits of its execution and/or historical importance.Even Arthur C. Clarke, whose special year is 2001, will have to wait a while longer for commercial travel to the Moon. It is a sobering thought to consider that fifty years ago 2000 looked like the relatively distant future, a time of wonders and radical difference. Now the year 2000 looks somewhat like the 1950s, plus computers and minus the Cold War. Most of the same buildings are standing in most major cities.

Some things don't change fast enough, other changes leave us breathless or shocked. Fifty years is not so long, less than the career of Jack Williamson for instance, who published in 1929 and this year too, in the course of seven decades of writing SF—and barring unforeseen circumstances, Williamson will be inhis eighth decade of writing when you read this. I leave you again with the thought that we should set our SF stories further ahead in time, lest we become outdated fantasy too soon.

As to the quality of the year's fiction, 2000 was a particularly fine year, with grand old names and hot new talents competing for attention. It was a good year to be reading the magazines, both pro and semi-professional. It was a strong year for novellas, with fifteen or twenty of them in consideration for the limited space allowed in this book by length constraints; you'll have to go to the competing Year's Best in fat trade paperback to sample more novellas. And there were a hundred shorter stories in consideration, from which this rich selection was chosen. So I repeat, for readers new to this series, my usual disclaimer: this selection of science fiction stories represents the best that was published during the year 2000. I could perhaps have filled two or three more volumes this size and then claimed to have nearly all of the best—though not all the best novellas. I believe that representing the best from year to year, while it is not physically possible to encompass it all in one even very large book, also implies presenting some substantial variety of excellences, and I left some writers out in order to include others in this limited space.

Which is not to say that I choose one kind of science fiction'I try to represent the varieties of tones and voices and attitudes that keep the genre vigorous and responsive to the changing realities out of which it emerges, in science and daily life. This is a book about what's going on now in SF. The stories that follow show, and the story notes point out, the strengths of the evolving genre in the year 2000. I hope that this book and its companions are essential reading in SF.

David G. HartwellPleasantville, NYThe New York Review of Science Fiction (www.NYRSF.com or c/o DragonPress, PO Box 78, Pleasantville, NY 10570) is a monthly 24p journal ofessays and reviews on SF and fantasy.
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Introduction

Acclaimed editor and anthologist David G. Hartwell is back with the sixth annual collection of the year's most impressive, thought-provoking, and just plain great science fiction.

Last year I said that 1999 was one of the legendary years of the science fiction future, and we have lived through it. So of course was 2000, the turning point, the end of a thousand year period of growth and change and a significant moment in the Christian Era (AD). Well, the world didn't end, nor did the Second Coming come, nor the aliens in whatever form. Nor was there a socialist civilization in Boston, Massachusetts as envisioned by Edward Bellamy in Looking Backward in the 1880s. And now that that millennium is gone, we live in the Year One CE, and all the SF written about the 80s and 90s is just fiction--now robbed of most of its significant prophetic power--and must stand or fall as fiction, on the merits of its execution and/or historical importance. Even Arthur C. Clarke, whose special year is 2001, will have to wait a while longer for commercial travel to the Moon. It is a sobering thought to consider that fifty years ago 2000 looked like the relatively distant future, a time of wonders and radical difference. Now the year 2000 looks somewhat like the 1950s, plus computers and minus the Cold War. Most of the same buildings are standing in most major cities.

Some things don't change fast enough, other changes leave us breathless or shocked. Fifty years is not so long, less than the career of Jack Williamson for instance, who published in 1929 and this year too, in the course of seven decades of writing SF--and barring unforeseen circumstances, Williamson will be in his eighth decade of writing when you read this. I leave you again with the thought that we should set our SF stories further ahead in time, lest we become outdated fantasy too soon.

As to the quality of the year's fiction, 2000 was a particularly fine year, with grand old names and hot new talents competing for attention. It was a good year to be reading the magazines, both pro and semi-professional. It was a strong year for novellas, with fifteen or twenty of them in consideration for the limited space allowed in this book by length constraints; you'll have to go to the competing Year's Best in fat trade paperback to sample more novellas. And there were a hundred shorter stories in consideration, from which this rich selection was chosen. So I repeat, for readers new to this series, my usual disclaimer: this selection of science fiction stories represents the best that was published during the year 2000. I could perhaps have filled two or three more volumes this size and then claimed to have nearly all of the best--though not all the best novellas. I believe that representing the best from year to year, while it is not physically possible to encompass it all in one even very large book, also implies presenting some substantial variety of excellences, and I left some writers out in order to include others in this limited space.

Which is not to say that I choose one kind of science fiction'I try to represent the varieties of tones and voices and attitudes that keep the genre vigorous and responsive to the changing realities out of which it emerges, in science and daily life. This is a book about what's going on now in SF. The stories that follow show, and the story notes point out, the strengths of the evolving genre in the year 2000. I hope that this book and its companions are essential reading in SF.

David G. Hartwell, Pleasantville, NY The New York Review of Science Fiction is a monthly 24p journal of essays and reviews on SF and fantasy.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2014

    PART THREE OF BLACKEST OF CROW IS AT

    Res 3. Sorry the results moved

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  • Posted October 10, 2009

    Stories with some meat to them

    If you want to think instead of reading the predictable fluff that most people read, then buy this book. It's filled with a good variety of plots presented in different writing styles.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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