Yellow House: Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin Side by Side

Yellow House: Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin Side by Side

by Susan Goldman Rubin, Joseph A. Smith
     
 

Living alone in the south of France, Vincent van Gogh missed the company of other painters. Hoping to attract artists to Arles, where he was staying, van Gogh invited Paul Gauguin to come live with him in his Yellow House. For two months, in the fall of 1888, the two men painted side by side. However, they set about their work in very different ways.

Vincent

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Overview

Living alone in the south of France, Vincent van Gogh missed the company of other painters. Hoping to attract artists to Arles, where he was staying, van Gogh invited Paul Gauguin to come live with him in his Yellow House. For two months, in the fall of 1888, the two men painted side by side. However, they set about their work in very different ways.

Vincent painted what he saw around him; Paul painted from his memory and imagination. Vincent painted quickly, while Paul often worked on paintings over a period of time. Vincent tended to be disorganized and messy, and Paul was very organized and tidy.

A wonderful introduction to the world of artists for young readers, The Yellow House is a thought-provoking story about how artists generate and share ideas and how they work. Along with reproductions of actual paintings by Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin, the rich and lively illustrations by Jos. A. Smith bring the story to life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This intriguing introduction to two esteemed painters, published in association with the Art Institute of Chicago, spans two months at the end of 1888, when Gauguin accepted van Gogh's invitation to live and work at his yellow house in Arles. Laced with quotes from letters the artists wrote to others, Rubin's (Margaret Bourke-White) narrative underscores the contrasts between the duo's living and painting habits. For van Gogh, "Thick swirls of strong colors expressed his feelings his love of nature, his joy in painting," while Gauguin "painted more slowly.... He spread the paints smoothly in careful shapes." Van Gogh painted from nature, Gauguin "from his imagination feelings, fantasies, and dreams." The author's incisive, accessible analysis of some of the paintings created during their time together accompanies crisp reproductions of their work. Smith's (Circus Train) lifelike watercolor and gouache portraits effectively convey the distinctive characteristics of each man as well as the particulars of the setting and era. Sadly, their constant bickering, according to the author, eventually culminated in a quarrel that ended with van Gogh cutting off part of his own ear and precipitated Gauguin's departure from Arles. Rubin concludes with concise biographical sketches of each artist. This appealing volume will likely spark an interest in the artists' complete works. Ages 5-9. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is a beautiful and accurate recreation of the crucial eight weeks Van Gogh and Gauguin spent in Arles, France in 1888, published in association with the Art Institute of Chicago. The time in the yellow house produced important work that highlights the differences and the influences of their individual styles. Carefully reproduced watercolors and gouache on paper show a comparison of their portrait of the same subject: Van Gogh working quickly, painting what he sees, background in yellow; Gauguin more imaginative and detailed, using his favorite color red as background. The text clearly shows their differences in style and temperament, leading to quarrelling and ending Van Gogh's dream of a Studio of the South for all artists to visit. This outstanding picture book concludes with full-page biographies of both artists, a selected bibliography and list of art credits. 2001, Abrams,
— Sandi Wisner
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
This title showcases several of the memorable works created by these two great artists during the brief period when they shared a country house. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Post-Impressionists Van Gogh and Gauguin were two prodigiously talented painters whose short-lived collaboration (less than three full months in the late fall of 1888) was both astonishingly productive and fraught with conflict. Each artist had a highly individual vision, a powerful personality, and vastly different aesthetics. Rubin (There Goes the Neighborhood, p. 871, etc.) and Smith (Circus Train, not reviewed, etc.) have collaborated on this informed and engaging survey that's well-timed to complement a show on the unique "Studio of the South" at the Art Institute of Chicago this fall. Vincent moved to Arles in the spring of 1888 and set up his studio in a sun-yellow house. He wanted another painter to join him in Provence and asked his brother Theo to convince Paul Gauguin to come to Arles. They were an artistic odd couple. Vincent was messy and impulsive. He worked plein aire and favored a quick, direct method of painting. He loaded his brushes with paint-some right out of the tube. Gauguin favored preliminary studies and careful, slow, detailed rendering. He preferred to work and rework his canvases in the studio. Artistic and personality differences coupled with Van Gogh's increasing mental instability doomed the partnership. That notwithstanding, both painters work was infused with new vitality and greater power. This well-conceived introduction includes nearly a dozen fascinating pairings by Van Gogh and Gauguin, paintings of the same or similar subjects: Madame Ginoux, portraits of their own rush-seated chairs, landscapes. Smith's own well-crafted watercolor paintings add welcome harmony to the painters' dissonant relationship and make the book into a comprehensible,enjoyable whole. (author's note, artist's note, bibliography, art credits, brief biographies) (Nonfiction. 8-11)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810945883
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 12.25(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
810L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

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