Yemen

Yemen

by Hal Marcovitz
     
 

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Like its neighbors on the Arabian Peninsula, the Republic of Yemen has a long and rich history. The southern Arabian region, which present-day Yemen shares, was once the home of the Sabaean kingdom. Led by the queen of Sheba, the kingdom formed an alliance with King Solomon, as recorded in the Old Testament. In the era of the burgeoning spice trade, the people of the… See more details below

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Overview

Like its neighbors on the Arabian Peninsula, the Republic of Yemen has a long and rich history. The southern Arabian region, which present-day Yemen shares, was once the home of the Sabaean kingdom. Led by the queen of Sheba, the kingdom formed an alliance with King Solomon, as recorded in the Old Testament. In the era of the burgeoning spice trade, the people of the Yemen region, which was advantageously located along the sea routes to Asia, had opportunities to attain great wealth. However, the British and other powers to the north eventually made their own claims on trade in the region. In the years after losing control of their great ports, the Yemenis have endured long periods of poverty and armed conflict, much of which has been waged between their rival northern and southern states. A much-needed unification between the north and south finally occurred in 1990, but Yemen still struggles to resolve its regional differences and compete with the oil-rich states of the Persian Gulf.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Once a powerful kingdom ruled by the Queen of Sheba and exporter of frankincense and myrrh, Yemen has had a long and violent history. Fought over by many empires, Yemen became a Muslim nation in the seventh century and continued its history of battles, assassinations, and religious strife. Beginning in the 19th century, South Yemen and the port of Aden were dominated by Britain until 1967. Since then, a divided Yemen endured civil wars and coups, reuniting in 1990 as a republic under President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Yemen's ancient past has left many ruins of archaeological interest and lately has attracted tourists. Its people are mostly Muslim, concentrated in the narrow coastal strip along the Gulf of Aden, though some live in small mountain villages. Culture is traditional; most men carry guns of all kinds, women are subservient under sharia and wear the black sharshaf; though Saleh has made attempts at modernization, literacy is low. Specialties of Yemen include coffee (first exported from Mocha in 1618) and qat, slightly narcotic leaves chewed almost universally. The capital, Sanaa (now overcrowded and dirty), is noted for its tall tower houses, some 2,000 years old. Though this "Modern Muslim Nations" series is labeled "Revised and Updated," Yemen covers events only through 2008—students will need to pursue further research on chaos in Yemen since the Tunisian revolution of 2011. President Saleh, responding to anti-government demonstrators with force and delaying tactics, was nearly assassinated, while violence continued as prices rose and some provinces fell outside government control. The situation is worrisome for the U.S., as an Al Qaeda—linked faction has gained strength. (In late 2011, a radical Muslim cleric advocating violence against the U.S. was killed by an American missile.) Note: The Foreign Policy Research Institute, a conservative think tank contributed an introduction. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422213964
Publisher:
Mason Crest
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Series:
Major Muslim Nations Series
Edition description:
Updated
Pages:
120
Sales rank:
1,201,100
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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