Yes, Chef: A Memoir

( 43 )

Overview

JAMES BEARD AWARD NOMINEE • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VOGUENEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“One of the great culinary stories of our time.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times
 
It begins with a simple ritual: Every Saturday afternoon, a boy who loves to cook walks to his grandmother’s house and helps her prepare a roast chicken for dinner. The grandmother is Swedish, a retired ...

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Yes, Chef

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Overview

JAMES BEARD AWARD NOMINEE • NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VOGUENEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

“One of the great culinary stories of our time.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times
 
It begins with a simple ritual: Every Saturday afternoon, a boy who loves to cook walks to his grandmother’s house and helps her prepare a roast chicken for dinner. The grandmother is Swedish, a retired domestic. The boy is Ethiopian and adopted, and he will grow up to become the world-renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson. This book is his love letter to food and family in all its manifestations. Yes, Chef chronicles Samuelsson’s journey, from his grandmother’s kitchen to his arrival in New York City, where his outsize talent and ambition finally come together at Aquavit, earning him a New York Times three-star rating at the age of twenty-four. But Samuelsson’s career of chasing flavors had only just begun—in the intervening years, there have been White House state dinners, career crises, reality show triumphs, and, most important, the opening of Red Rooster in Harlem. At Red Rooster, Samuelsson has fulfilled his dream of creating a truly diverse, multiracial dining room—a place where presidents rub elbows with jazz musicians, aspiring artists, and bus drivers. It is a place where an orphan from Ethiopia, raised in Sweden, living in America, can feel at home.

Praise for Yes, Chef
 
“Such an interesting life, told with touching modesty and remarkable candor.”—Ruth Reichl
 
“Marcus Samuelsson has an incomparable story, a quiet bravery, and a lyrical and discreetly glittering style—in the kitchen and on the page. I liked this book so very, very much.”—Gabrielle Hamilton
 
“Plenty of celebrity chefs have a compelling story to tell, but none of them can top [this] one.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Elegantly written . . . Samuelsson has the flavors of many countries in his blood.”—The Boston Globe
 
“Red Rooster’s arrival in Harlem brought with it a chef who has reinvigorated and reimagined what it means to be American. In his famed dishes, and now in this memoir, Marcus Samuelsson tells a story that reaches past racial and national divides to the foundations of family, hope, and downright good food.”—President Bill Clinton

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

World-renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson has two names and has lived on three continents. Forty-two years ago, he was born as Kassahun Tsegie in Ethiopia. When he was just three, his mother died. Not long thereafter, he and his sister were adopted by a Swedish family. It was in Sweden, in the kitchen of his grandmother, that he gained his love of cooking. After a professional apprenticeship in his adopted country, Switzerland, and Austria, he moved to the United States in 1991 to pursue success. He fulfilled his dreams far beyond expectations, winning James Beard Awards both as a chef and a cookbook author. In 2009, his star shined even brighter when he was selected to prepare the first state dinner of Barack Obama's presidency. In this memoir, Samuelsson writes with warmth and candor about food and family, his two great lives. Now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

From the Publisher
Advance praise for Yes, Chef
 
“The Red Rooster’s arrival in Harlem brought with it a chef who has reinvigorated and reimagined what it means to be American. In his famed dishes, and now in this memoir, Marcus Samuelsson tells a story that reaches past racial and national divides to the foundations of family, hope, and downright good food.”—President Bill Clinton
 
“I’ve read a lot of chefs’ books, but never anything like this one. Marcus Samuelsson has had such an interesting life, and he talks about it with touching modesty and remarkable candor. I couldn’t put this book down.”—Ruth Reichl, bestselling author of Tender at the Bone

“Marcus Samuelsson has an incomparable story, a quiet bravery, and a lyrical and discreetly glittering style—in the kitchen and on the page. I liked this book so very, very much.”—Gabrielle Hamilton, bestselling author of Blood, Bones, & Butter
 
“The pleasures of this memoir are numerous. Marcus Samuelsson’s life, like his cooking, reflects splendidly multicultural influences and educations, and he writes about it all with an abundance of flavor and verve. A delicious read.”—Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385342612
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/21/2013
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 139,686
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Marcus Samuelsson

A James Beard Award–winning chef and author of several cookbooks, Marcus Samuelsson has appeared on Today, Charlie Rose, Iron Chef, and Top Chef Masters, where he took first place. In 1995, for his work at Aquavit, Samuelsson became the youngest chef ever to receive a three-star review from The New York Times. His newest restaurant, Red Rooster, recently opened in Harlem, where he lives with his wife.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

My African Mother

I have never seen a picture of my mother.

I have traveled to her homeland, my homeland, dozens of times. I have met her brothers and sisters. I have found my birth father and eight half brothers and sisters I didn't know I had. I have met my mother's relatives in Ethiopia, but when I ask them to describe my mother, they throw out generalities. "She was nice," they tell me. "She was pretty." "She was smart." Nice, pretty, smart. The words seem meaningless, except the last is a clue because even today, in rural Ethiopia, girls are not encouraged to go to school. That my mother was intelligent rings true because I know she had to be shrewd to save the lives of myself and my sister, which is what she did, in the most mysterious and miraculous of ways.

My mother's family never owned a photograph of her, which tells you everything you need to know about where I'm from and what the world was like for the people who gave me life. In 1972, in the United States, Polaroid introduced its most popular instant camera. In 1972, the year my mother died, an Ethiopian woman could go her whole life without having her picture taken--especially if, as was the case with my mother, her life was not long.

I have never seen a picture of my mother, but I know how she cooked. For me, my mother is berbere, an Ethiopian spice mixture. You use it on everything, from lamb to chicken to roasted peanuts. It's our salt and pepper. I know she cooked with it because it's in the DNA of every Ethiopian mother. Right now, if I could, I would lead you to the red tin in my kitchen, one of dozens I keep by the stove in my apartment in Harlem, filled with my own blend and marked with blue electrical tape and my own illegible scrawl. I would reach into this tin and grab a handful of the red-orange powder, and hold it up to your nose so you could smell the garlic, the ginger, the sundried chili.

My mother didn't have a lot of money so she fed us shiro. It's a chickpea flour you boil, kind of like polenta. You pour it into hot water and add butter, onions, and berbere. You simmer it for about forty-five minutes, until it's the consistency of hummus, and then you eat it with injera, a sour, rich bread made from a grain called teff. I know this is what she fed us because this is what poor people eat in Ethiopia. My mother carried the chickpea powder in her pocket or bag. That way, all she needed to make dinner was water and fire. Injera is also portable, so it is never wasted. If you don't finish it, you leave it outside and let it dry in the sun. Then you eat it like chips.

In Meki, the small farming village where I'm from, there are no roads. We are actually from an even smaller village than Meki, called Abrugandana, that does not exist on most maps. You go to Meki, take a right in the middle of nowhere, walk about five miles, and that is where we are from.

I know my mother was not taller than five feet, two inches, but I also know she was not delicate. Those country women in Ethiopia are strong because they walk everywhere. I know her body because I know those women. When I go there now, I stare at the young mothers to the point of being impolite. I stare at those young women and their children and it's like watching a home movie that does not exist of my childhood. Each woman has a kid, who might well be me, on her back, and the fingers of her right hand are interlocked with another slightly older kid, and that kid is like my sister. The woman has her food and wares in her bag, which is slung across her chest and rests on her hip....

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 43 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2012

    Brought tears to my eyes, and love into my heart!

    Wonderfully written. Moving.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2012

    I loved this book. The story is incredibly moving, plus Marcus

    I loved this book. The story is incredibly moving, plus Marcus is a great story teller. I could not put it down and found myself in tears at three different parts. I would highly recommend this book - it's the best book I have read in ages.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Who Knew?

    Not only a great chef but a very good writer. This would still be an intetesting book even if you didn't know who the writer was. Kudos Marcus. I highly recommend this book.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 11, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    It is an absolute pleasure to read a chef's memoir about somethi

    It is an absolute pleasure to read a chef's memoir about something other than how many drugs they have done of how drunk they can get on the line and still put out food.

    Marcus Samuelsson's passion for food and drive to excel leap from the page and swirl through the readers mind like the aromatics from the pots and pans on his stove. This is a story of high-quality food and cooking and how to obtain it. Through hard work, passion, and determination, Marcus has become a chef we should all look up to and emulate.

    This is the book I'd like to represent a chef's life.

    It is a pleasure to read and an inspiration.

    Victoria Allman
    author of: SEAsoned: A Chef's Journey with Her Captain and Sea Fare A Chef's Journey Across the Ocean

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    Excellent and fascinating memoir! Unable to put down! Met him at

    Excellent and fascinating memoir! Unable to put down! Met him at book signing with a smile to match his life experiences. Will recommend and continue following his journey!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 24, 2012

    A Fascinating Story about a Fascinating Chef

    I have always been intrigued by Marcus Samuelsson; when watching him on the Food Network, I'd always hear his accent and wonder where he was from. When I found out that he was Swedish but was born and adopted out of Ethiopia, I knew that he'd have an interesting story to tell. I admire his cooking skills, love for food, and commitment to elevating Harlem cuisine, but he has by far the most colorful personal story out of all the celebrity chefs out there. A most enjoyable read and a great journey into a man's life.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    Learn about the behind the scenes culinary world

    Excellent journey into what it takes to be an outstanding chef. Well written and engaging.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Well written, hard to put down book. Amazing, inspiring story.

    Thanks, chef, and all those who helped to write this book. Excellent!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2013

    Our book club read and discussed this remarkable story. Thank y

    Our book club read and discussed this remarkable story. Thank you Marcus for the history and journey of your inspiring life.
    Excellent!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 10, 2013

    Superb book, well done Mr. Samuelsson. The mark of a good book i

    Superb book, well done Mr. Samuelsson. The mark of a good book is that you feel better for having read it - like the mark of a good meal, where you feel better for having eaten it. Truly an amazing story, told with respect and compassion. The writing is poetic. Highly recommended for all, not just the foodies.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    Good read for anyone

    I read this book as a food lover and fan of the chef, but his life and journey are so unique and moving that I think anyone would enjoy this!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 8, 2012

    Great read. Enjoyed the behind the scenes of different kitchens

    Great read. Enjoyed the behind the scenes of different kitchens.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    Evie

    STOP POSTING YOUR ADS AT PON IT IS REALLY FU<_>CKING ANOUYING

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    Xander

    "Hey." he says

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    Recommend highly

    This was a selected by a member of my book club. It is not a book I would have chosen to read on my own. I was pleasantly surprised at what an interesting book it is. Describing his childhood and how his race affected his career was quite fascinating. This was a fast read for me. I recommend it highly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    To kenzie

    Nope it Egrith he changed. So how about you screw off and leave you nasty bit<3>ch. And go shower i smell fish. Might wanna clean that pus<3>sy. Next time i see you advertise this you WILL NOT be able to post EVER!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    Kenzie to to egrith

    His name is bob so screw off

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2013

    Michelle

    How could u? Just lie to me!!!:( im forgetting u......i thought of u everyday it haunted me and made me happy at he same time.....im done with u parker bye

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    Amazing book

    Could not put this down. Loved the vivid descriptions of Sweden and Africa.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2013

    A wonderful book!

    I took a chance on this, and I loved it! I was surprised to encounter such a fine human being with such an interesting life journey.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews

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