BN.com Gift Guide

Yes! We Are Latinos!

Overview

Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino.

Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each youth provide specific stories and circumstances for the...

See more details below
Hardcover
$13.68
BN.com price
(Save 27%)$18.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (35) from $2.28   
  • New (14) from $5.37   
  • Used (21) from $2.28   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino.

Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each youth provide specific stories and circumstances for the reader to better understand the Latino people’s quest for identity. Each profile is followed by nonfiction prose that further clarifies the character’s background and history, touching upon important events in the history of the Latino American people, such as the Spanish Civil War, immigration to the US, and the internment of Latinos with Japanese ancestry during World War II.

Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy’s informational yet heartwarming text provides a resource for young Latino readers to see themselves, while also encouraging non-Latino children to understand the breadth and depth of the contributions made by Latinos in the US. Caldecott Medalist David Diaz’s hand-cut illustrations are bold and striking, perfectly complementing the vibrant stories in the book.

YES! WE ARE LATINOS stands alone in its presentation of the broad spectrum of Latino culture and will appeal to readers of fiction and nonfiction.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The authors of Tales Our Abuelitas Told shape fictional portraits of 13 young people living in the U.S., who have diverse experiences and backgrounds but share a Latino heritage. The first-person narrative poems range from reflective to free-spirited, methodical to free-association. A boy in Detroit dreams of opening a hospital in his family’s native Dominican Republic; a Puerto Rican girl wants her parents to support her dreams of attending college, rather than splurge on “an elaborate party—/ a quinceañera production”; and two friends—one Guatemalan, one Peruvian—are learning the native language of their Chinese and Japanese grandparents. In the most resounding monologue, a Hispanic Native American shares advice from his brother that crystallizes the book’s message: “Never forget who you are.” Informative nonfictional interludes succinctly address relevant subjects, including immigration, the challenges migrant workers face, and Cuba-U.S. history. Diaz’s (Smoky Night) angular, hand-cut b&w illustrations are reminiscent of woodblock prints, balancing images from the past and present. An eye-opening and thoughtful celebration of cultural identity. Ages 10–13. Authors’ agent: Adriana Dominguez, Full Circle Literary. Illustrator’s agent: East West Literary Agency. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Jean Boreen
This thought-provoking collaborative work from two children’s book authors and a Caldecott-winning illustrator gives middle grade readers an interesting take on what it means to be Latino in the United States today. Twelve chapters follow an introduction entitled “What Makes Someone Latino?” and, essentially, answer that question through beautifully crafted poetry about a Latino character, an informational essay that provides more detail about the noted “type” of Latino, and hand-cut illustrations in black that support the people and actions featured in each section. Each chapter begins with a name, the country of origin for that person or that person’s family, where that person lives, and the phrase “I Am Latina/Latino.” The concluding sections of the text provide additional information about the contributions of those from Latino cultures, a resource bibliography for parents, and additional resources for young people interested in learning more about any or all of these cultural groups. This would be a great acquisition for any school library. Reviewer: Jean Boreen, Ph.D.; Ages 10 to 16.
Kirkus Reviews
A poetic celebration of the diversity found among Latinos. Each poem in this collection of 13 vignettes is a glimpse into the life of a Latino child living in the United States. Ada and Campoy do a commendable job of creating a nuanced, realistic reflection of the many-faceted Latino experience, including characters from a variety of ethnic, religious, language and racial backgrounds. It may be unclear to readers what rendering them in poetry adds to these tales, but they are nonetheless successful stories. An informational piece follows each poem that--while sometimes slightly didactic--expands on the social and historical context with honesty and depth. (One exception is "Deep African Roots," which, while an otherwise good piece, puzzlingly neglects to explore the unique history of blacks in Panama, though the preceding poem is about a black Panamanian boy.) Diaz's signature black-and-white cut-paper art decorates the collection and is especially noteworthy in its reflection of the themes in the informational pieces. Would that the authors had shared why they included Spaniards as Latinos when whether or not Spaniards consider themselves Latinos appears to be up for debate. Still, with only minor flaws, it is a collection both interesting and educational, offering Latino children positive representations of themselves and teaching non-Latino children about the richness and breadth of the Latino experience. (acknowledgements, bibliography, additional resources, index) (Poetry. 10 & up)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580893831
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge Publishing, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/1/2013
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 301,771
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Lexile: 1050L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.70 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Alma Flor Ada is the celebrated author of hundreds of books for young readers and adults, including UNDER THE ROYAL PALMS (Atheneum, 1998) a Pura Belpré Award winner and TALES OUR ABUELITAS TOLD: A HISPANIC FOLKTALE COLLECTION with F. Isabel Campoy (Atheneum, 2006). She lives in the San Francisco Bay area in California. F. Isabel Campoy is the author of more than one hundred books of poetry, art, biography, and folklore for children incluing ROSA RAPOSA and ¡PÍO PEEP!, co-authored by Alma Flor Ada. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)