Yes, Your Teen Is Crazy!: Loving Your Kid Without Losing Your Mind

Yes, Your Teen Is Crazy!: Loving Your Kid Without Losing Your Mind

4.3 13
by Michael J. Bradley
     
 

ISBN-10: 0936197447

ISBN-13: 9780936197449

Pub. Date: 12/28/2002

Publisher: Harbor Press, Inc.

Now in paperback! Here is the book that updates the rulebook, giving parents the training and skills they need to transform their teenage children into strong, confident, productive adults. Now in paperback! Here is the book that updates the rulebook, giving parents the training and skills they need to transform their teenage children into strong, confident,

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Overview

Now in paperback! Here is the book that updates the rulebook, giving parents the training and skills they need to transform their teenage children into strong, confident, productive adults. Now in paperback! Here is the book that updates the rulebook, giving parents the training and skills they need to transform their teenage children into strong, confident, productive adults. Now in paperback, here is the book that updates the rulebook, giving parents the training and skills they need to transform their teenage children into strong, confident, productive adults.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780936197449
Publisher:
Harbor Press, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/2002
Pages:
363
Sales rank:
596,098
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.23(h) x 0.84(d)

Table of Contents

Forewordxi
Acknowledgmentsxiii
Introductionxv
Part 1Your Child: The New-Millennium Adolescent1
Chapter 1The Adolescent Brain3
Chapter 2Your Adolescent's World: Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n Roll Like You Never Saw18
Chapter 3Peer Influence and Your Child39
Chapter 4Adolescent Change51
Chapter 5Adolescent Insanity: What's Normal, What's Not61
Part 2New-Millennium Parents: Understanding Your Role and Accepting Your Challenge101
Chapter 6Grieving the Death of Your Sweet, Compliant Child103
Chapter 7Parental Self-Examination: How Your Behavior and Personality Affect Who Your Adolescent Is113
Chapter 8The Family Matters: Parent Teamwork, Divorce, Single Parenting, and Blended Families135
Part 3Putting It All Together: Field-Tested Strategies for Effectively Parenting Your Adolescent161
Chapter 9The 10 Commandments of Parenting Your Teen165
Chapter 10Making and Enforcing Rules and Decisions196
Chapter 11Problem-Solving Strategies: What to Do When Your Teen...225
Chapter 12Balancing Safety with Privacy: Walking the Razor's Edge252
Chapter 13Surviving Your Kid's Rage263
Chapter 14Drugs: The DOs and the DON'Ts277
Chapter 15Sex and Dating: What You Need to Know292
Chapter 16Getting Help305
Chapter 17Epilogues: Coming Home319
Suggested Reading325
Index329

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Yes, Your Teen Is Crazy! 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Good grief. As I read this, I saw myself and my son...sometimes in not so wonderful ways. But always productive. This book gave me ways of understanding and dealing with my teen that have been wonderful. Is life perfect here? No. But is life 94% better? You better believe it. I recommend this book 100%. You won't regret buying it and reading it. Life with a teenager is much more healthy and enjoyable after reading it. Teens even understand you and family life more after reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read this book completely through and twice more I've read all my highlighted sections. It gives you a new way of looking at your teen...a way to look at them with love again and why it's so important that you do so. It's a new perspective on how to handle all the crazyness and stay sane yourself. A must read for parents with teenagers!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read dozens of parenting books over the 13 years of my teen's life. This is the BEST I've ever read. It give medical, practical and logical advice for dealing with normal teenage craziness. It helped me to realize that my teen wasn't 'bad' but normal. It gave me concrete advice for how to anticipate and deal with all of the issues we parents of teens face. It gave me hope and spoke to my insecurities. More importantly, the advice WORKS! I highly recommend this book for all parents of teens, whether you are having problems or not.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Awesome book, not only for me but my children as well. Author explains exactly what I havn't been able to put into words for the longest time! Very informative!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best parenting book I have ever read...and I have read more than a few. This is a must read for anyone looking for sensible advice from someone who knows how you feel. It will help you to help your child and restore your faith in yourself as a parent. Get it now!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Three pages in, I felt my frustration and anger being replaced by a wave of compassion for my son. The insights we gained from reading this had immediate and positive effects. Clearly written, easily absorbed. I've recommended it to dozens of people and everyone agrees. It was life-changing for us. Don't battle through the teen years. Read this book and learn how to get back to loving your teens.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The author was writing about my son and about me. I actually cried tears of relief to think that someone actually UNDERSTANDS what we have been going through. Not only does the author understand, his many clients have experienced the same emotions. I am not a failure as a parent! There is hope for our relationship and love is the key. If you have a teenager, you must read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before reading this review, you should know that this book contains language and subjects that would cause it to exceed an ¿R¿ rating if it were a motion picture. These vulgarities, sexual references, and violence are essential to the book¿s content. The author also apologizes for the need to employ them. If your teenager had a serious case of the flu, you would be sympathetic and helpful. When the same teenager acts in ways you disagree with, are you inclined to be unsympathetic and challenging? Dr. Bradley argues in this intriguing book that your reaction should be very similar. Both are usually natural occurrences of body dysfunctions from which your teen will recover. Although that may sound like a psychological metaphor, Dr. Bradley points out that research with MRIs shows that the growth of the corpus callosum (which coordinates cross-brain functions) and development of the prefrontal cortex (which civilizes responses that the ¿old brain¿ stimulates) are both occurring during the teenage years. Until those brain developments are more complete, your teen will react in bizarre ways that she or he will be unable to explain. I found that way of thinking about teenage behavior to be fascinating. My own description of the teenage years experienced by our children was that boys¿ behavior generally went downhill until age 13 when it bottomed out, to begin gradually improving thereafter. For girls, the decline in behavior seemed to begin around 13, and started to improve after age 20. Dr. Bradley points out that teens have always been like this. So what has changed? ¿We¿ve created a world dripping with sex, drugs, and violence and plunked our temporarily insane children in the middle of it.¿ Parents often treat their teens as though they can handle it. ¿The fact is that cannot handle `it¿ and they know this.¿ ¿Teens left on their own as small adults not only . . . [make serious mistakes], they become depressed and rageful in the bargain.¿ Dr. Bradley¿s descriptions of the increased exposure to these influences on television, at home, in school, and with friends will leave you convinced that we have a more toxic environment for today¿s teenagers. He cites many case histories and statistics to make his points very compelling. The solution is for parents to change, and become a more positive influence on their teens. I was especially moved by his observation that parents need to stop mourning for their younger, happy, well-behaved child who will not return any time soon. He offers ten commandments for being a good parent: (1) Behave and think dispassionately; (2) Listen well and support emotionally; (3) Say little in a pleasant way; (4) Take the time you need to make an appropriate response; (5) Forget your personal pride in finding a response; (6) Avoid being physical, even friendly gestures can be annoying to teens; (7) Apologize for anything you have done wrong; (8) Accept the identity your teen is trying out; (9) Be true to your own beliefs; and (10) Remember that all this will eventually pass. The book offers excellent guidance on rule-setting and enforcement that are similar to what worked well with our now grown-up teens. The book also has sections on how to deal with common problems like privacy, angry teens, drugs, sex and dating, family problems, discussing legal versus illegal drugs. You are also given a sense of what is normal and abnormal behavior related to acting out, depression, eating disorders, and suicide risk. For any hint of abnormal behavior, get professional help fast (apparently 19% of teens have given serious thought to how they would commit suicide, and the depressed teens are not the ones most at risk). You are also given good ideas for how to get teens to professional help. One of the best parts of this section is pointing out how two parents should cooperate (if you and your spouse are together) and single parents can best cope. Dr. Bradley also