Yesterday Had a Man in It

Yesterday Had a Man in It

by Leslie Adrienne Miller
     
 
Leslie Adrienne Miller's poems are tickets to some fascinating places-- scary, fantastic places like Indonesia and Berlin and Zanesville, Ohio; the riot-torn country of adolescence; the tough villages of family and friendship; and, again and again, the dark, trackless, lovely forests of desire. Writing utterly from within her own skin, from her specific heart housed

Overview

Leslie Adrienne Miller's poems are tickets to some fascinating places-- scary, fantastic places like Indonesia and Berlin and Zanesville, Ohio; the riot-torn country of adolescence; the tough villages of family and friendship; and, again and again, the dark, trackless, lovely forests of desire. Writing utterly from within her own skin, from her specific heart housed in her exact, particular bones, she's a poet also and absolutely of the larger world, of foreign places, foreign tongues, and she writes about the other as intimately as if she shared its blood.

Editorial Reviews

Minnesota Literature
"This collection reveals a poet at the height of her talents. In "Babes in Toyland," a poem written about a concert in Loring Park, she wistfully examines the young women dancing in disheveled clothes and dye-streaked hair, contemplating their movements, their open-faced anger and their cultivated look of abandon. In "The Small Streets of Ubud," she describes rice terraces and ritual, evoking Balinese women at work on their "sprigs of tribute" to the gods. Self-aware and often rife with self-mockery, her poems bring us straight to the center of the scene at hand, enlivening it with a voice that is unafraid and full of hope."
Andrea H. Buddy
Yesterday Had a Man In It is Leslie Adrienne Miller's third volume of poetry. The book's 37 poems are as compelling as its title. The title poem, exemplary of many in the volume, invites the reader to enter it. "How many times might it happen/ in one woman's life," Miller asks, that a man "shows her/ ...something about which he has a story?" Then the poet draws for us the possibilities-- "it could ... have been/ a raw landscape, a yellow mountain/ of rocks flat and clinking like plates..." -- and finally she brings us to that familiar moment when something the man does changes us . . . . Many of Miller's poems explore this familiar, human terrain that only poetry seems to be able to expose satisfactorily. In "Warts," she says, "For months I tried to hide what I grew/ in the dark garrison of my childhood." The poem goes on to expose the common, rarely spoken fear shared by most adolescent girls that in them "nothing fair, pure/ or girl enough to be loved/ could ever grow." These are mature, engaging, valuable poems."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780887482717
Publisher:
Carnegie-Mellon University Press
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Series:
Carnegie Mellon Poetry Series
Pages:
88
Product dimensions:
5.52(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.26(d)

What People are saying about this

Lynn Emanuel
The central figure of this glittering set of poems is a heroine in the grand manner. Like Colette or Jean Rhys, in their literary incarnations, it is not that she is ahead of her time, it is that she is so clearly part of her time...Miller is always engaging, eloquent, smart, and honest.
Edward Hirsch
I am moved by these poems of independence infused with a dark self-knowledge, with a wry wisdom and tough vulnerability, with a hopefulness she cannot forget, will not forego. These poems enlarge experience and engage life.

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