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Yiddish with George and Laura
     

Yiddish with George and Laura

by Ellis Weiner, Barbara Davilman
 

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What do George and Laura Bush have in common with Dick and Jane? Well, both hail from prototypical WASP families. And, perhaps more to the point, both exhibit a natural resistance to moral complexity (i.e., reality).

That's the premise of this hilarious new primer-style book in which George, Laura, and the entire Bush family communicate with uncharacteristic

Overview

What do George and Laura Bush have in common with Dick and Jane? Well, both hail from prototypical WASP families. And, perhaps more to the point, both exhibit a natural resistance to moral complexity (i.e., reality).

That's the premise of this hilarious new primer-style book in which George, Laura, and the entire Bush family communicate with uncharacteristic expressiveness, conveying shades of of feeling and nuances of meaning that plain old English can't deliver--by peppering their conversatuon with Yiddishisms.

See George's mother.

Her name is Bar.

She wears a lot of pearls and is a farbisseneh.

"You are late, George," Bar says.

"Of course I am late," George says.

"I am the President of the United States.

I am a big macher."

Like all good primers, YIDDISH WITH GEORGE AND LAURA tells a simple story--and, in the end, important life lessons are imparted.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316050203
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
11/15/2008
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
4 MB

Read an Excerpt



Yiddish with George and Laura



By Ellis Weiner Barbara Davilman


Little, Brown


Copyright © 2006

Ellis Weiner and Barbara Davilman

All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-316-01446-X



Chapter One


See George. He is our president. He lives in a fancy white house and
is a big shmegegg

George loves his job. He gets to take a lot of vacations. He gets to
do special things for his family and friends. "Not bad for an
ex-shikker," he thinks.

See Laura. She is George's wife. She loves George very much. She is
a nice lady and a shiksa.

See Jenna and Barbara. They are George and Laura's twin daughters.
They are a couple of sheyna maidls.

Jenna was cited two times for underage drinking. Barbara was cited
only once. George and Laura shepn naches from their lovely girls.

Shept, George and Laura, shept. Shept, shept, shept.

George and Laura and the girls are going to a birthday party for
George's parents.

Their birthdays are four days apart. The party is at the family
house in Kennebunkport.

Kennebunkport is a pretty town in Maine.
A lot of goyim live there.

See George's mother. Her name is Bar. She wears a lot of pearls and
is a farbissenah.

"You are late, George," Bar says. "Of course I am late," George
says. "I am the president of the United States.
I am a big macher."

"I do not care," says Bar. "You should have been here two hours ago.
Doro and the wives got tired of waiting. They went shopping for
tchotchkies."

"We wantto go shopping too," says Jenna. "But you just got here,"
says Bar. "We want to spend money and help the economy," says
Barbara.

"Oh, all right," says Bar. "But stay away from the farkaktah media."

"Where is Dad?" asks George. He holds out a flag. "I got this for
him."

"He does not want that flag, George," says Bar.

"If he did he would have gotten one himself.
But I will put it in the den with all our other chazerai."

(Continues...)





Excerpted from Yiddish with George and Laura
by Ellis Weiner Barbara Davilman
Copyright © 2006 by Ellis Weiner and Barbara Davilman.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Ellis Weiner has been an editor of National Lampoon, a columnist for Spy, and a contributor to many magazines, including The New Yorker and the New York Times Magazine.


Barbara Davilman writes for television. They live in Los Angeles.

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