Yoga for Kids

Overview

Yoga for Kids is a colorful and fun exercise program for young beginners that takes children through all the stages of a yoga session from warm-ups through sun salutations, seated and standing postures, to the relaxation phase. The postures are specially selected to appeal to children and are inspired by nature and animals, such as the mountain, tree, cat, lion, cobra, peacock and fish poses. Each one is introduced by a brief story about the pose and is followed by illustrated ...
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Overview

Yoga for Kids is a colorful and fun exercise program for young beginners that takes children through all the stages of a yoga session from warm-ups through sun salutations, seated and standing postures, to the relaxation phase. The postures are specially selected to appeal to children and are inspired by nature and animals, such as the mountain, tree, cat, lion, cobra, peacock and fish poses. Each one is introduced by a brief story about the pose and is followed by illustrated step-by-step instructions.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Designed for parents and children, this handsomely-produced how-to manual uses traditional hatha yoga terminology for the postures, yet presents the material in an easily accessible manner. The introduction is intended for the adult helper and facilitator, combining yoga concepts with contemporary needs and conditions. A sidebar explains the three types of yoga practice and matches them up with the gunas (qualities) of individuals. A warm-up spread offers "safe, playful preparation" for the asanas or postures to follow. Each spread introduces an asana or set of asanas, using both the traditional Sanskrit name for each and a modern equivalent. Simple, clear instructions are accompanied by photographs of children demonstrating the postures. Clear and easy to follow, the sequence opens with the ancient sun salute, and progresses through familiar nature and animal poses (lion, cat, cobra, peacock and so on). These are divided into creatures of the wild, sky, water, and earth. In addition there are ample spreads on shapes, postures for bravery, topsy-turvy postures, relaxation exercises, sense exercises, breathing, and group and partner exercises. In some instances, alternative renditions of standard poses are offered that can accommodate differences in both ability and preference. Following the natural progression of a yoga class, this is an intuitively- designed program. Children should be attracted to the introductory text at the beginning of each asana, and to the full-color photographs. The book is blessedly free of the sentimental commentary that often characterizes such titles. Characterizing yoga as a holistic mind-body approach and not just an exercise regimen, Lark stays true to boththe philosophy and the practical constructs of yoga for our time. Adults who guide kids should find it both practical and informative, much like having a very competent teacher-practitioner at one's side. 2003, Firefly, Ages 8 up.
—Uma Krishnaswami
Island Parent - Nikki Tate-Stratton
Lavishly illustrated... easy to use and a pleasure to peruse.
Resource Links - Lisa Mowat
An informative colorful guide to an exercise program suitable for children of all ages... The clear layout and colorful pictures make this book very user friendly.
Youngstown Vindicator
Offers exercises and imaginative play... presented for the non-expert adult... the language is child-friendly.
Brandon This Week - F.P. Bookman
Bright, colorful introduction to yoga for children as young as pre- schoolers... exercises and postures were selected specifically to appeal to children.
Toronto Sun - Marilyn Linton
[Lark] takes the basic yoga positions and makes them fun... colorful kid's anecdotes and terrific step-by-step photos.
BC Parents - Elizabeth Shaffer
An excellent resource... emphasizes the many benefits of practicing yoga with your child and stresses the many benefits realized by children engaging in yoga.
Nashville Parent Magazine
Simple step-by-step instructions paired with 200 photographs... All ages can learn.
Georgia Family
Parents who are unfamiliar with yoga can learn how to provide yoga instruction for preschoolers up to young adolescents.
Children's Digest - Ana Maria Correa
Exercise award winners... simple instructions, helpful tips and 200 full-color photographs.
Central Coast Adventures
Imaginative play ideas and exercises... walks readers through all stages of a yoga session... two hundred color photos.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781606712337
  • Publisher: MJF BOOKS
  • Publication date: 3/14/2014
  • Sales rank: 675,286
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Liz Lark is the author of Power Yoga, Yoga for Life and co-author of Yoga for Beginners. She leads international yoga retreats and workshops.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 6
Chapter 1 Yoga & Your Child 8
Chapter 2 Warm Up & Wake Up 20
Chapter 3 The Postures 30
Chapter 4 Relaxation Exercises 96
Chapter 5 Sense Exercises & Breathing 104
Chapter 6 Group & Partner Exercises 114
Resources 124
Index 126
Acknowledgements 128
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Preface

Introduction

Vivid memories of kids are indelibly on my mind for ever. In 1984, while I was working for a year in Murree, a Himalayan hillstation school, two children called Fatima and Raazia would smile at me deliciously during break, calling "Miss Lizzie!" with thick bread wads in one hand and hot buffalo milk in the other. Visiting them at night, they would jump inexhaustibly up and down like frogs on their thick woven razais, duvets made of mountain sheep's wool. For those two faces in the Pakistan Himalayas I dedicate this book, wherever they may be now, and to my nephew and niece, Ben and Philippa.

My second memory: sitting by a lake bursting with white lilies in Kodikanal, another hillstation in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. An echo of growing laughter brought with it a bunch of wild kids on the end of huge pogo sticks cut from trees, twice their size, arriving boisterously at the lake's edge in great leaps. Here they began to plop, giggling their unbottled laughter into the water, watching me now and then. After several minutes of play and mischievously pointed nods, they drew closer, wading through the lilies. One by one each child climbed out of the water, dragging behind them garlands of sopping wet flowers. As I watched silently, they began to lay garland upon garland of lilies, which they had threaded together in the water bed of the lake, around my neck. Dumbstruck in wet honor by this adornment, I basked in their wide-eyed smiles as they pogoed away, left speechless by these kids who make wet joy from nature.

Steve Biddulph, in his book The Secret of Happy Children, tells the story of a Swiss doctor who compared two World War II orphanages in Europe. One was a Western field hospital, with ample provisions and nurse care, and the other a remote mountain village with minimal but adequate provisions, staffed by local villagers and surrounded by kids, dogs and goats. His observation was that the babies in the field hospital had everything material, but little in the way of affection, touch and stimulation, whereas those in the villages had only basic care, but masses of hugs and affection — and it was these babies that were thriving. The doctor deduced that children need three important requirements: frequent touch, movement (rocking, carrying, bouncing); and eye contact (smiling and a colorful environment).

Twenty-first century kids have to contend with growing up in a crazy-paced world, with the stresses of busy parents and home life, coupled with raging hormones and in-your-face media and advertising. Schooling may be competitive, and it is no surprise that children become stressed, as adults do. Drawing on the techniques of yoga can empower children, as well as adults, with tools to handle stress, moods and anxieties and can provide time-outs to cultivate self-awareness, confidence and calm amid the "moving sea of chaos" (which yogis call samsara). Being the daughter of a priest, I feel a strong need to find those positive meeting points that link people of all cultures and religions, and I find that yoga provides a universal language that can help an individual deepen their personal spirituality, philosophy or sense of meaning. Essentially, yoga cultivates a childlike mind, untainted by conditioning, keeping the garden of Eden open.

"When I was young, the mountains were the mountains, the river was the river, the sky was the sky. Then I lost my way, and the mountains were no longer the mountains, the river no longer the river, the sky no longer the sky. Then I attained satori (enlightenment), and the mountains were again the mountains, the river was again the river, the sky was again the sky."
— traditional Zen saying
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Introduction

Introduction

Vivid memories of kids are indelibly on my mind for ever. In 1984, while I was working for a year in Murree, a Himalayan hillstation school, two children called Fatima and Raazia would smile at me deliciously during break, calling "Miss Lizzie!" with thick bread wads in one hand and hot buffalo milk in the other. Visiting them at night, they would jump inexhaustibly up and down like frogs on their thick woven razais, duvets made of mountain sheep's wool. For those two faces in the Pakistan Himalayas I dedicate this book, wherever they may be now, and to my nephew and niece, Ben and Philippa.

My second memory: sitting by a lake bursting with white lilies in Kodikanal, another hillstation in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. An echo of growing laughter brought with it a bunch of wild kids on the end of huge pogo sticks cut from trees, twice their size, arriving boisterously at the lake's edge in great leaps. Here they began to plop, giggling their unbottled laughter into the water, watching me now and then. After several minutes of play and mischievously pointed nods, they drew closer, wading through the lilies. One by one each child climbed out of the water, dragging behind them garlands of sopping wet flowers. As I watched silently, they began to lay garland upon garland of lilies, which they had threaded together in the water bed of the lake, around my neck. Dumbstruck in wet honor by this adornment, I basked in their wide-eyed smiles as they pogoed away, left speechless by these kids who make wet joy from nature.

Steve Biddulph, in his book The Secret of Happy Children, tells the story of a Swiss doctor who compared two World War IIorphanages in Europe. One was a Western field hospital, with ample provisions and nurse care, and the other a remote mountain village with minimal but adequate provisions, staffed by local villagers and surrounded by kids, dogs and goats. His observation was that the babies in the field hospital had everything material, but little in the way of affection, touch and stimulation, whereas those in the villages had only basic care, but masses of hugs and affection -- and it was these babies that were thriving. The doctor deduced that children need three important requirements: frequent touch, movement (rocking, carrying, bouncing); and eye contact (smiling and a colorful environment).

Twenty-first century kids have to contend with growing up in a crazy-paced world, with the stresses of busy parents and home life, coupled with raging hormones and in-your-face media and advertising. Schooling may be competitive, and it is no surprise that children become stressed, as adults do. Drawing on the techniques of yoga can empower children, as well as adults, with tools to handle stress, moods and anxieties and can provide time-outs to cultivate self-awareness, confidence and calm amid the "moving sea of chaos" (which yogis call samsara). Being the daughter of a priest, I feel a strong need to find those positive meeting points that link people of all cultures and religions, and I find that yoga provides a universal language that can help an individual deepen their personal spirituality, philosophy or sense of meaning. Essentially, yoga cultivates a childlike mind, untainted by conditioning, keeping the garden of Eden open.

"When I was young, the mountains were the mountains, the river was the river, the sky was the sky. Then I lost my way, and the mountains were no longer the mountains, the river no longer the river, the sky no longer the sky. Then I attained satori (enlightenment), and the mountains were again the mountains, the river was again the river, the sky was again the sky."
-- traditional Zen saying
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