Yoko Finds Her Way

Yoko Finds Her Way

by Rosemary Wells
     
 

Yoko and her mama are going on a trip to Japan! Yoko helps Mama get to and through the airport by reading signs along the way. By the time they get to their gate, Mama is exhausted. While Mama naps, Yoko goes to the washroom. But "Oh, no!" Yoko takes the wrong exit and finds herself in a completely different part of the terminal. Before she knows it, Yoko is on the… See more details below

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Overview

Yoko and her mama are going on a trip to Japan! Yoko helps Mama get to and through the airport by reading signs along the way. By the time they get to their gate, Mama is exhausted. While Mama naps, Yoko goes to the washroom. But "Oh, no!" Yoko takes the wrong exit and finds herself in a completely different part of the terminal. Before she knows it, Yoko is on the moving walkway, zipping toward Baggage Claim. Will she be able to follow the signs back to her mama?

With her flair for sly humor, Rosemary Wells defuses an anxious situation by keeping Yoko cool and confident, unlike poor Mama! Readers will enjoy reading the signs along with Yoko in this happy-ending story about navigating a very big but very friendly airport.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
03/17/2014
Yoko returns in her sixth picture book, which has the green-eyed kitten and her kimono-wearing mother getting ready for a flight to Japan. The kitten serves as a self-assured and observant guide to the airport experience, helping her mother find the right airline, moving through security with ease, and being attentive to the signs that appear as icons across the top of most pages. Even when Yoko gets lost after a trip to the restroom, she knows just what to do (“Yoko followed the signs to the Airport Police and asked for help”). Wells offers a narrative-driven alternative to books like Maria van Lieshout’s recent Flight 1-2-3, one that will give young would-be travelers a boost of confidence. Ages 3–5. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
Yoko and her kimono-clad mother have an adventure at the airport at the beginning of their trip to Japan. The security process exhausts Mama, who falls asleep at the gate, so Yoko goes by herself to the restroom. But when she exits by a different door, she and her mother have some difficulty in finding each other again. Though each runs afoul of the basic principle of search and rescue-stay put-the glitch offers Yoko, and by extension young readers, an opportunity to be independent and resourceful. Yoko finds her way to the airport police, while her mother enlists the reassurance of several helpful workers, and they are comfortably reunited. For some reason, everyone in this airport, unlike at Yoko's school, is a cat-maybe to minimize the scariness of crowds of strangers? Icons for everything (food, stairs, elevators, terminals, airport police) give readers a chance to note details and to be observant along with Yoko as she figures out what to do. A successful conclusion for the trip and perhaps a recounting to grandmother of the adventure must wait for another book. The rich presentation, from endearing illustration to paper and design to color and touches of gold and silver, celebrates the experience of reading a book; that the story is told in both words and symbols allows young listeners to follow along in complex ways. A terrific book to share with children preparing for their first flights as well as Yoko's fans. (Picture book. 3-7)—Kirkus

Yoko returns in her sixth picture book, which has the green-eyed kitten and her kimono-wearing mother getting ready for a flight to Japan. The kitten serves as a self-assured and observant guide to the airport experience, helping her mother find the right airline, moving through security with ease, and being attentive to the signs that appear as icons across the top of most pages. Even when Yoko gets lost after a trip to the restroom, she knows just what to do ("Yoko followed the signs to the Airport Police and asked for help"). Wells offers a narrative-driven alternative to books like Maria van Lieshout's recent Flight 1-2-3, one that will give young would-be travelers a boost of confidence. Ages 3 5.—PW

As other Yoko books have done, this appealing title uses an everyday occurrence to teach a fundamental concept-in this case, reading signs. Yoko and her mama (and Yoko's doll, Miki) are traveling to Japan. At the airport Yoko and her mother are separated, and each uses the abundant signs to find her way back to gate 54 in time for their flight. The pages are carefully composed to tell the straightforward story, with simple text at the bottom; Wells' colorful watercolors, embellished with spots of metallic gold, occupying the center; and a series of pictographic signs along the top. For instance, when Yoko heads to the restroom to wash her hands, the reader sees recognizable symbols for women's and men's rooms, complete with feline ears. In places the images lack the author's typical refinement, and a few details confound (everyone here is a cat, including those represented in the signs, except for a lone bird driving on the highway), but fans of Yoko's other books will happily join her for this sweet, rudimentary adventure. - Thom Barthelmess—Booklist

PreS-Gr 2 Yoko and her mother are flying to Japan, and the airport is big and unfamiliar to both of them. Following internationally recognized symbols for restrooms, escalators, information, police, etc., they make their way to the correct gate but not without first getting separated from each other. Wells is a master at showing emotions through her characters' expressions, drawing readers into their plight. Symbols run along the top of each page at the airport, adding to the sense of place and drama. A colorful cast of airport staff, along with Yoko's reliable smarts, saves the day and will help children learn to recognize the value of signs and of being alert to one's surroundings. Wells adds Asian flair by using Hokusai's famous Great Wave Off Kanagawa print as the logo for Big Wave Airlines. Artfully done. B. Allison Gray, Goleta Public Library, CA—SLJ

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Yoko, the charming, well-dressed kitten heroine of five other books, is going to fly to Japan with her mother and her doll Miki. On the drive to the airport, Yoko’s mother asks her to read the signs for her. And we readers can “read” them too, as they appear above the illustrations and text. First are the visual signs for parking, luggage carts, and the train. Then comes passport check, with the signs with slashes designating what is forbidden, as they go through security. Signs indicate both cups of tea and ice cream for refreshment. Yoko goes to wash up in the “Big Girls’ room,” but she leaves by the wrong door. She is lost, but follows the Airport Police sign and is taken to her gate. But then Mama gets lost. Luckily she gets back to the gate so they can board on time. The series of boxed, brightly colored illustrations in gouache and collage, one or two per page, are filled with action and many characters portraying all the details mentioned in the text with a touch of humor. The end pages are filled with the various signs for readers to interpret. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz; Ages 4 to 7.
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
PreS-Gr 2—Yoko and her mother are flying to Japan, and the airport is big and unfamiliar to both of them. Following internationally recognized symbols for restrooms, escalators, information, police, etc., they make their way to the correct gate but not without first getting separated from each other. Wells is a master at showing emotions through her characters' expressions, drawing readers into their plight. Symbols run along the top of each page at the airport, adding to the sense of place and drama. A colorful cast of airport staff, along with Yoko's reliable smarts, saves the day and will help children learn to recognize the value of signs and of being alert to one's surroundings. Wells adds Asian flair by using Hokusai's famous Great Wave Off Kanagawa print as the logo for Big Wave Airlines. Artfully done.—B. Allison Gray, Goleta Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
2013-03-13
Yoko and her kimono-clad mother have an adventure at the airport at the beginning of their trip to Japan. The security process exhausts Mama, who falls asleep at the gate, so Yoko goes by herself to the restroom. But when she exits by a different door, she and her mother have some difficulty in finding each other again. Though each runs afoul of the basic principle of search and rescue—stay put—the glitch offers Yoko, and by extension young readers, an opportunity to be independent and resourceful. Yoko finds her way to the airport police, while her mother enlists the reassurances of several helpful workers, and they are comfortably reunited. For some reason, everyone in this airport, unlike at Yoko's school, is a cat—maybe to minimize the scariness of crowds of strangers? Icons for everything (food, stairs, elevators, terminals, airport police) give readers a chance to note details and to be observant along with Yoko as she figures out what to do. A successful conclusion for the trip and perhaps a recounting to grandmother of the adventure must wait for another book. The rich presentation, from endearing illustration to paper and design to color and touches of gold and silver, celebrates the experience of reading a book; that the story is told in both words and symbols allows young listeners to follow along in complex ways. A terrific book to share with children preparing for their first flights as well as Yoko's fans. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423165125
Publisher:
Disney Press
Publication date:
04/08/2014
Series:
A Yoko Book Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
637,763
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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