Yoon and the Christmas Mitten
  • Yoon and the Christmas Mitten
  • Yoon and the Christmas Mitten

Yoon and the Christmas Mitten

by Recorvits, Gabi Swiatkowska
     
 

In My Name Is Yoon, Yoon's parents encouraged her to write her name in English instead of Korean. Now it's Yoon's turn to teach her parents about something she's learned in America. When Yoon's teacher lends her a book about Santa Claus, Yoon can't wait to show it to her parents. To Yoon's disappointment, though, her mother responds, "We are not a Christmas

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Overview

In My Name Is Yoon, Yoon's parents encouraged her to write her name in English instead of Korean. Now it's Yoon's turn to teach her parents about something she's learned in America. When Yoon's teacher lends her a book about Santa Claus, Yoon can't wait to show it to her parents. To Yoon's disappointment, though, her mother responds, "We are not a Christmas family." As Christmas Eve approaches, Yoon learns more and more about this exciting holiday. But no matter how hard she tries to convince her parents to sing Christmas songs or put up Christmas stockings, they always say no. A determined Yoon soon realizes that she must use her own "Shining Wisdom" to persuade her parents that they can indeed be a Christmas family.

Distinctive and glowing pictures with brushstrokes echoing Renoir accompany this charming story that rings true and reaches deep.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The magnificent illustrations are painted in a distinctive style with elements both impressionistic and surrealistic, perfectly suiting Yoon's changing world." —Starred, Kirkus Reviews

"Children and parents alike will be charmed by Yoon's yearning and determination to experience a bit of Christmas magic." —School Library Journal

"Luminous. Even Santa skeptics and outright non-believers will be charmed as Yoon and her family embrace a new and delightful tradition." —The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"An affecting story about reconciling cultural identity, beautifully brought to life in Swiatkowska's evocative, feathery portraits and dreamscapes." —Booklist

Publishers Weekly
PW said in a starred review of My Name Is Yoon, "Yoon may be new to America, but her feelings as an outsider will be recognizable to all children." Here the heroine struggles with remaining true to her Korean traditions while embracing the ways of her new home in Yoon and the Christmas Mitten by Helen Recorvitis, illus. by Gabi Swiatkowska. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
In this follow-up to "My Name is Yoon" Yoon learns much about the Christmas traditions of her young classmates and she longs to celebrate as they do, at school and at home. When she shows her father a story about Santa Claus he pushes the book away, saying, "We are Korean. Santa Claus is not our custom." Yoon dreams about the North Pole and longs for a beautifully decorated Christmas tree. When she tries to sing a song about one of Santa's reindeer, her mother reminds the young girl that they are not a Christmas family. Yoon knows her parents will not allow her to hang up a stocking, but she does pin a red mitten to her blanket hoping Santa Claus will leave her a present. Yoon's mother and father find a way to make Yoon's dreams come true by combining the Korean and American customs in a sensitive and loving way. The watercolor illustrations capture the joy and the essence of the story in a beautiful manner.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-The endearing heroine of My Name Is Yoon (Farrar, 2003) is learning about Santa Claus and the North Pole at school. She is captivated, but her parents insist that "-we are not a Christmas family. We are a Korean family." However, after Yoon points out that they are both American and Korean, her parents figure out a way to meld a Christmas tradition with their own New Year's celebration. Yoon's round and expressive face is depicted as captivated, joyous, and implacable by turns, and her holiday imaginings are rendered as sprightly, juggling Korean-looking elves and a surreal but childlike North Pole. Her parents are rather suddenly and easily convinced to let the tradition of Santa into their home, but children and parents alike will be charmed by Yoon's yearning and determination to experience a bit of Christmas magic.-Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In their second collaboration about a Korean-American girl named Yoon, this team continues to explore the sensitive little girl's adjustment to living in the U.S. When Yoon learns about "Mr. Santa Claus" and hanging up stockings on Christmas Eve, she wants to have those traditions at her house, too. Her parents are against any sort of Christmas celebration, observing Korean New Year's Day traditions instead. In her own distinctive way, Yoon makes her parents realize how important it is to her to try to fit in with her classmates by observing Christmas. On Christmas Eve, a "shadow figure" leaves a package with a new red dress next to Yoon's bed and a tiny present in her mitten: her first candy cane. When she returns to school, Yoon wears her new dress and tells the class about her Korean New Year's traditional celebration. The first-person narration effectively conveys the innocent, limited viewpoint of a six-year-old and her intense need for acceptance by both her parents and her peers. The magnificent illustrations are painted in a distinctive style with elements both impressionistic and surrealistic, perfectly suiting Yoon's changing world. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374386887
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
10/31/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 9.28(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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