You Can Negotiate Anything: The World's Best Negotiator Tells You How to Get What You Want

( 3 )

Overview

Every day, you negotiate for something: prestige, money, security, love. This straight-talking guide will show you how to get what you want by dealing successfully with your mate, your boss, MasterCard, your children, your best friends and even yourself. As Herb Cohen counsels, "Power is based upon perception— if you think you've got it then you've got it. Be patient, be personal, be informed— and you can bargain successfully for anything."

Based on his book that spent over nine...

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Overview

Every day, you negotiate for something: prestige, money, security, love. This straight-talking guide will show you how to get what you want by dealing successfully with your mate, your boss, MasterCard, your children, your best friends and even yourself. As Herb Cohen counsels, "Power is based upon perception— if you think you've got it then you've got it. Be patient, be personal, be informed— and you can bargain successfully for anything."

Based on his book that spent over nine months on the New York Times bestseller list, the author presents specific guidelines, personal anecdotes and practical advice drawn from his three decades of successful negotiating experience. Here is a wealth of information and the motivation that you need to succeed.

This New York Times bestseller helps readers change their limiting behavior and though patterns so they can get what they want in life.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553281095
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/28/1982
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 161,583
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.88 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Herb Cohen has been called "the world's best negotiator." He's internationally renowned as a corporate and governmental consultant on negotiating strategy, commercial dealings and crisis management. As a U.S. presidential advisor, he has helped to formulate policy on hostage negotiations and terrorism. He is president of the Power Negotiations Institute in Northbrook, IL.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2002

    Selling or whining???

    Mr. Cohens book held very little new information for the salesman or negotiator and the boring stories he used to make valid (but by no means original) points eliminated ever using the book for any type of reference. As a student of evolving sales techniques I have never, until now, seen whining as a sales technique, but Mr. Cohen seems to live on it. He made some great points on mutually beneficial outcomes, but most of his stories were to his benefit only. Do you think the refridgerator salesman was mutually satisfied that Mr. Cohen had wasted 9 hours of his time??? Or that the salesman could care if he ever saw him again? I got his point about persistence, but my idea of persistence is a little different. I once was negotiating a deal where the salesman followed me to the bathroom (never missing a word) and bored me and my partner to tears until we signed (it was New Years Eve). His type of persistence (which Mr. Cohen endorses) caused us to sign a bad deal that was quickly terminated by our lawyers. Who was mutually satisfied and how could you embark on a long term relationship using tactics like that? On the plus side he did consistently speak of pooling info, resources and experience to bring a mutually beneficial deal (even if his stories contradicted them).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2001

    Negotiation 101

    ¿You Can Negotiate Anything¿ can best be described as an introduction to developing negotiation skills. Its target audience is the average American, whether a housewife struggling with stubborn children, or the first-time manager. The author, Herb Cohen, is a lawyer and family man, a professional speaker on the topic of negotiation, and a consultant. His writing style is casual, with a conversational tone, and his applications of techniques are presented in a down-to-earth manner that the average reader can easily relate to. The basic premise of his book is that negotiations are part of everyday life, and that recognition of this fact, along with development of negotiation skills, will lead to greater satisfaction and personal success. The text is filled with practical applications, from negotiations with family, to business relations, to government foreign policy. The book is divided into four sections. The first section introduces the three basic components of negotiation as the perception of power, time investment and constraints, and the balance of information between the parties. The author discusses tactics that employ these three components to sway negotiations. The second section of the book gives an in-depth description of power, time, and information. The power chapter, 40 pages long, brilliantly outlines fourteen specific types of power essential to understand when negotiating with others, particularly if in a management position. Cohen effectively addresses the psychological element of power. The information in this chapter alone is worth the price of the book. Different negotiation styles are discussed in the third section. Win-lose and win-win negotiations are described in detail, to include countermeasures to avoid being victimized if involved with a win-lose negotiator. The examples provided in this section are both interesting and informative. The fourth section is a short collection of additional illustrative stories. If the author had excluded anecdotes, this would have been a thirty-page booklet, but the extensive examples effectively clarified the pertinent points of negotiation, serving as an amusing, yet effective teaching method. This book is an excellent introduction to negotiation for the causal reader, but is not appropriate as a quick reference guide because of the illustrative nature of the text, with information buried within stories.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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