You Can Observe A Lot By Watching: What I've Learned About Teamwork From the Yankees and Life

( 3 )

Overview

"The most valuable team player in sports" shows you what "teamwork" really means

What does it take to be a real team player, especially in a society that glorifies selfishness and a corporate culture that often uses "team player" as a buzzword but rewards only the showboaters and prima donnas? Well, You Can Observe a Lot by Watching. In this happy and hilarious guide to teamwork, sportsmanship, and winning, Yogi Berra draws on the timeless wisdom handed down by example from ...

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You Can Observe A Lot By Watching: What I've Learned About Teamwork From the Yankees and Life

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Overview

"The most valuable team player in sports" shows you what "teamwork" really means

What does it take to be a real team player, especially in a society that glorifies selfishness and a corporate culture that often uses "team player" as a buzzword but rewards only the showboaters and prima donnas? Well, You Can Observe a Lot by Watching. In this happy and hilarious guide to teamwork, sportsmanship, and winning, Yogi Berra draws on the timeless wisdom handed down by example from ballplayers who came before him to inspire you to make the right choices and become not only a better team player—at sports, at work, and in life—but a better person.

Filled with colorful stories from his life and career, not to mention the down-to-earth wit and insight that Yogi fans love, You Can Observe a Lot by Watching shows you how to make a bad team good and a good team great.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* Notorious for his run-ins with the English language, baseball great Berra has become an improbably prolific author. He and coauthor Kaplan follow up 2002’s What Time Is It? You Mean Now? with this charming, if meandering, book about teamwork. In anecdote after anecdote about his legendary career with the Yankees, his not-so-legendary career as a manager, and his days growing up on the streets of St. Louis, Berra shows how respect and cooperation made him a success on the field and in life. Lessons include the importance of punctuality, owning one’s mistakes, and a positive attitude. For better or worse, nuggets of wisdom (“Never give an opponent added motivation”) are buried beneath a mountain of less-than-insightful sports ephemera (Derek Jeter is “a good leader because he always knows and does what’s right”). Still, Berra’s optimism and wry, absurdist sense of humor make it a fast read that should resonate with fans; as one would expect, Berra includes plenty of well-meaning advice in his signature, well-near-meaningless style: “Unless you have an excuse, there’s no excuse.” (May) (Publishers Weekly, June 2008)

"...[it] offers nearly half a century's distilled wisdom on the subject of teammates and the value of team play from the biggest winner (14 pennants and 10 World Series rings) in baseball history..." (YouCanObserveSyn, April 13, 2008)

"...[it] offers nearly half a century's distilled wisdom on the subject of teammates and the value of team play from the biggest winner (14 pennants and 10 World Series rings) in baseball history..." (Post Dispatch (St Louis), April 6, 2008)

Publishers Weekly
Notorious for his run-ins with the English language, baseball great Berra has become an improbably prolific author. He and coauthor Kaplan follow up 2002's What Time Is It? You Mean Now? with this charming, if meandering, book about teamwork. In anecdote after anecdote about his legendary career with the Yankees, his not-so-legendary career as a manager, and his days growing up on the streets of St. Louis, Berra shows how respect and cooperation made him a success on the field and in life. Lessons include the importance of punctuality, owning one's mistakes, and a positive attitude. For better or worse, nuggets of wisdom ("Never give an opponent added motivation") are buried beneath a mountain of less-than-insightful sports ephemera (Derek Jeter is "a good leader because he always knows and does what's right"). Still, Berra's optimism and wry, absurdist sense of humor make it a fast read that should resonate with fans; as one would expect, Berra includes plenty of well-meaning advice in his signature, well-near-meaningless style: "Unless you have an excuse, there's no excuse."
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Enjoyable, sometimes humorous, and occasionally revealing love fests to American sports' most storied franchise, these two volumes present the observations of the great former pinstriper Berra and near-great Murcer. The two ex-Yankees agree about what makes a truly successful team: concern for one's teammates and a largely selfless dedication to the task of winning. No player was more successful in that regard than Berra, whose Yankees won 14 pes and ten World Series championships during his career, in contrast to the ill-timed Murcer, who just missed out on the resurgent Yankees of the late 1970s and barely made a dent on the 1981 pennant-winning team. Berra praises star players Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle for setting an example by working "through tough times," making no excuses, striving for excellence, and passionately caring most about the well-being of the Yankees. He shares stories about Bill Dickey teaching him the art of catching, Jackie Robinson's burning desire to win, Derek Jeter's devotion to the team, Mantle's determination to be "a great teammate," Joe McCarthy and Joe Torre's confidence, DiMaggio's insistence that others play as hard and intelligently as he did, and Reggie Jackson's work ethic. Murcer, projected to be the next Mickey Mantle, never quite reached such heights but felt he had become part of the Yankees when Mick decided Murcer belonged. After exploring the ups and downs of his playing days, Murcer describes his all-Yankee team, the cancer that afflicted him, and issues ranging from steroids and asterisks to Marvin Miller, longtime union leader who devised the game's initial collective bargaining agreement. Both books are recommended for generallibraries.
—R.C. Cottrell

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470079928
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 4/25/2008
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,299,199
  • Product dimensions: 5.96 (w) x 8.68 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

YOGI BERRA is one of baseball's greatest catchers, the Yankees' greatest players, and the game's greatest ambassadors.

DAVE KAPLAN, a former editor and reporter for the New York Daily News, is the director of the Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center. He has cowritten Yogi's last three books.

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Table of Contents

Team Player.

My Bad.

The Essence of a Teammate.

The Yankee Way.

Catching Perfection.

What Were They Thinking?

Stirring with Reggie.

Find Your Role.

Hard to Change.

Making Everyone Better.

Quiet Leaders.

Respect Your Team.

Not Over Till It’s Over.

Uniform Policy.

You, a Manager?

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    You Can Observe a Lot by Watching - Yogi Berra with Dave Kaplan

    Any of the Yogi Berra books are well worth reading!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Disappointing... Yogi should stick to baseball

    I picked up this book expecting some real gems from a baseball genius. But alas, Yogi's aim here is to write a business/management book. This is unfortunate. He discusses teamwork ad nauseum, citing examples from his years in baseball. Instead, this book would have been infinitely better had he spoken of his baseball years and made the message more subtle.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2008

    A reviewer

    In all honesty, I'm only half way through the book. I started it this afternoon over lunch, and I could not put it down! As I began reading, I found myself sitting on a stoop in Brooklyn, and listening intentively to a man who talks non-fiction with such ease. There are no one hundred dollar words offered for the reader, but what does come across is one man's passion and pride for his 'other' family, the New York Yankees, in a very simple and honest tone. Mr. Berra 'talks' quite frankly and openly about The Mick and Joe D., about Phil Rizzuto and Whitey Ford, about Don Larson and catching his 'perfecto', about the early racial striff in baseball and how it affected Jackie Robinson and Elston Howard, and I could go on and on. But, more importantly, Mr. Berra tries to instill in the reader what it is to be a (man) part of a team, and the pride and 'where-with-all' that it takes to make that team into a champion. 'What happens in the clubhouse, stays in the clubhouse' is very apparent from page one. I cant't wait for lunch tomorrow and my continued infatuation with the latest installment from one of baseball's greatest, Thee Yog!!

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