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You Can Write a Report
     

You Can Write a Report

4.0 2
by Jennifer Rozines Roy
 
You sit at your desk staring at a blank piece of paper. Ever since your teacher gave you the assignment to write a report, you have worried and procrastinated. How will you hand in your paper by the due date if you can't even get started? Help is here! In You Can Write a Report, author Jennifer Rozines Roy explores different types of reports -- research reports, book

Overview

You sit at your desk staring at a blank piece of paper. Ever since your teacher gave you the assignment to write a report, you have worried and procrastinated. How will you hand in your paper by the due date if you can't even get started? Help is here! In You Can Write a Report, author Jennifer Rozines Roy explores different types of reports -- research reports, book reports, news reports, and lab reports. You will find out how to pick the best topic, how to do research, how to organize your information, how to follow the steps of the writing process, how to present the finished product -- and how to have some fun along the way!

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
This six-volume "You Can Write" series includes stand-alone titles about a variety of writing issues presented in an easy-to-read format. The titles not reviewed here include information about writing essays, business letters, speeches, and debates, and about the use of good grammar. You Can Write a Report provides a descriptive outline of report writing, including choosing a topic, researching, organizing the information, revising, and publishing. The steps are logically organized with bold headings to guide the reader. A brief section on evaluating sources includes a short paragraph about determining the reliability of Web site information. You Can Write a Story or Narrative begins with a discussion of the types of narratives and moves on to genre and character development. Conflict, theme, figurative language, and foreshadowing are covered in a separate chapter as tools for making the story more exciting. A short exploration of basic writing skills includes information on the parts of speech and sentence structure. Once a story has been written, the last chapter can be consulted for directions on writing query letters to publishers. Both titles include examples throughout to demonstrate specific writing skills, and they encourage good study habits such as research, developing outlines, proofreading, and rewriting. Although the graphic illustrations seem juvenile, the books would be used by middle through high school students. With the breadth of information covered there is little space devoted to each of the elements of writing, and therefore these titles would be best used to supplement classroom learning. VOYA Codes: 3Q 2P M J S (Readable without serious defects; Forthe YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2003, Enslow, 64p.; Glossary. Index. Illus. Further Reading., PLB. Ages 11 to 18.
—Heather Acerro
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-The first book attempts to make report writing enjoyable and exciting, but the presentation is anything but. Readers are bombarded with information and terminology without a breather. Roy begins by trying to drum up interest in her subject, defining the various kinds of reports and describing the writing process, the organization, and the final presentation of a paper or project. Some significant information is omitted. For example, there is no discussion of summarizing; however, quoting and paraphrasing are mentioned for note taking. "Thesis" is poorly defined. The black-and-white graphics are merely decorative and do not reinforce the text. Kids want to learn how to write a report quickly, so they can get to work. Elizabeth James and Carol Barkin's How to Write a Great School Report (Morrow, 1998) covers similar ground. Story helps children put the right words together and discern what comprises good writing by having them ask questions about their own work. For example, "What challenges do the characters face? Do they triumph?" The author discusses necessary elements of narrative writing such as point of view, conflict, and theme. She transfers a lot of pertinent information quickly and gives ideas for generating more interest in students' narratives and in their characters. Outlining, story mapping, and common grammar errors are discussed. An excellent checklist, or "wrap-up" page, helps young writers review and evaluate their work.-Kim Donius, Alfred-Almond Central School, Almond, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780766020863
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/28/2003
Series:
You Can Write Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
6.31(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
11 - 17 Years

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You Can Write a Report 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
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