BN.com Gift Guide

You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo

Overview

You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo looks at the world of extinct and endangered species. In easy-to-understand language, Fred Ehrlich covers dinosaurs, extinct birds and mammals, and endangered animals, giving clear and concise explanations of what happened to them. Punctuated with humorous verse to emphasize points and illustrated with whimsical cartoons, it's a book packed with information sure to inform both children and adults. Includes a glossary of complex words; and easy-to-understand, clear explanations of ...

See more details below
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo looks at the world of extinct and endangered species. In easy-to-understand language, Fred Ehrlich covers dinosaurs, extinct birds and mammals, and endangered animals, giving clear and concise explanations of what happened to them. Punctuated with humorous verse to emphasize points and illustrated with whimsical cartoons, it's a book packed with information sure to inform both children and adults. Includes a glossary of complex words; and easy-to-understand, clear explanations of complicated subjects.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
And speaking of zoos... in the fifth book of the series, Fred Ehrlich explains why You Can't See a Dodo at the Zoo, illus. by Amanda Haley. In addition to the Dodo (covered in the "Extinct Birds" chapter), Ehrlich covers dinosaurs, plus extinct mammals such as woolly mammoths, before discussing endangered animals, for whom there is still time to help (manatees, whooping cranes, etc.). Haley's pen-and-ink and watercolor wash illustrations add just the right note of humor without detracting from the seriousness of the book's message. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Dianne Ochiltree
Dinosaurs are the creatures thought of first when the topic of extinction comes to mind. But young readers may not know that many other animals have become extinct in the course of history. For example, how about the dodo bird of this charming book's title, which has only been extinct for about three hundred years? The author shows us, with funny poems and lively explanatory text, that every category of living thing has experienced extinction from Tyrannosaurus rex to the saber-toothed tiger to the bandicoot to the quagga to the rat kangaroo…and much, much more. Amanda Haley's drawings are cheerfully whimsical and fluid. Her renderings imaginatively depict all those colorful used-to-be characters of the wild with kid-centric humor. The author tackles the subject of endangered animals, too, with fascinating facts and funny poems. Included is a complete glossary of scientific terms at the end of the book. A great choice for home, library or classroom shelves. A rare combination of facts presented in a fanciful and accessible way… let's hope this book never becomes extinct! Reviewer: Dianne Ochiltree
Children's Literature
"Oh, you can't see a dodo at the zoo. You can look until your face is turning blue." From the poetic beginning to the author's serious conclusion, this book will have kids turning pages to learn about extinct and endangered animals. Written to entertain and to inform, the book is a delight to read. Most kids will know more about dinosaurs, mammoths, and saber-toothed tigers than is presented here, but they might not know about dodos, moas, bandicoots or quaggas. Explanations about what extinct and endangered mean, and why some animals have disappeared or are threatened, are easy to understand. Hopefully kids and adults alike will read the author's one-page conclusion and become aware that every change we make affects other living creatures and that we can make responsible decisions about how we can take care of ourselves while doing the least harm to other living things. Playful illustrations and lots of lighthearted rhymes, more often silly than not, will keep kids reading from beginning to end. A wonderful across-the-curriculum combination of zoology and poetry. 2005, Blue Apple Books, Ages 5 to 10.
—Anita Barnes Lowen
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-This book includes chapters on dinosaurs, birds, and mammals that are extinct, followed by a section explaining why other species like whooping cranes, Tasmanian devils, and piping plovers are endangered. The scientific information is clear and interesting. For example, a discussion of why dinosaurs became extinct includes four different theories in a straightforward manner. The bright cartoons add interest and appeal to the text. The author also includes short verses that are forced and ineffective. For example, "Dodos lived near Madagascar./Your mom may not know where that is,/so you'd better not ask her!" A manatee is described in the following way: "The manatee has a squishy snout/And big, fat flippers to paddle about./Though it isn't pretty to you or me,/It is to another manatee." Unfortunately, these lame attempts at humor trivialize the important topic.-Rebecca Sheridan, Easttown Library & Information Center, Berwyn, PA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Ehrlich and Haley team up again in this informative exploration of extinct and endangered animals. In clear and descriptive language, Ehrlich explains why the animals are gone or almost gone. He peppers the text with poems, too, but they're a distraction. Many of them are just plain uninspired, including the titular verse: "Oh you can't see a dodo at the zoo. / You can look until your face is turning blue. / Even if it makes you mad, / Or very, very sad, / You still can't see a dodo at the zoo." Haley's playful illustrations, which appear to be rendered in pen and ink, have a childlike appeal. Though flawed, this is a good introduction to the subject and will likely whet reader's appetites. (glossary) (Picture book/nonfiction. 5-10)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781609051501
  • Publisher: Blue Apple Books
  • Publication date: 7/1/2011
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 5 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Fred Ehrlich, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist, has written numerous children's books. He divides his time between Lincoln, Massachusetts, and Maplewood, New Jersey. He has a long-standing interest in the environment, particularly in the flora and fau

Amanda Haley holds a B.F.A. from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She lives in Ohio with her husband and their golden retriever, Sally.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)