You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You: Politics in the Clinton Years

You Got to Dance with Them What Brung You: Politics in the Clinton Years

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by Molly Ivins
     
 

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In her long-awaited new collection, the Colt Peacekeeper of American political humor draws a bead on targets that range from the Libido-in-Chief to Newt
Gingrich, campaign funny-money to the legislative lunacy of her native Texas—and hits a bull's-eye every time.

Whether she's writing about Bill Clinton ("The Rodney Dangerfield of presidents"),

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Overview

In her long-awaited new collection, the Colt Peacekeeper of American political humor draws a bead on targets that range from the Libido-in-Chief to Newt
Gingrich, campaign funny-money to the legislative lunacy of her native Texas—and hits a bull's-eye every time.

Whether she's writing about Bill Clinton ("The Rodney Dangerfield of presidents"), Bob Dole ("Dole contributed perhaps the funniest line of the year with his immortal observation that tobacco is not addictive but that too much milk might be bad for us.  The check from the dairy lobby must have been late that week"), or cultural trends ("I saw a restaurant in Seattle that specialized in latte and barbecue.  Barbecue and latte.  I came home immediately"), Molly takes on the issues of the day with her trademark good sense and inimitable wit.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Acerbic, down-home...Ivins is surely one of the nation's most adroit political commentators." —People

"Punctures everything from the liberal conscience to Texas culture to media ethics." —Chicago Tribune

"Fearless and funny." —Atlanta Journal & Constitution

Lance Gould
Molly Ivins, the Minnie Pearl of political commentary, fancies herself an anti-pundit; she peppers her prose with down-home aphorisms. But though her down-home homilies can be amusing, the gratuitous use of ''bidness'' and ''gummint'' can be cornier than a henhouse floor. Worse yet, in her latest collection of columns, ''You Got to Dance With Them What Brung You,'' Ivins consistently employs political sentiment to document her theses where most other commentators might use, say, facts. -- New York Times
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Ivins (Nothin' but Good Times Ahead) is what a good newspaper columnist should beopinionated, funny, preachy, sympathetic, temperamental, right, wrong and, above all, immensely entertaining. This latest sampling of magazine articles and newspaper columnstaken mostly from the Fort Worth Star-Telegramfinds the unabashed liberal rounding up the usual suspects for target practice. Everyone from Newt Gingrich to "Shiite Republicans" gets poked, but Ivins's crusade is political campaign financing, which she calls "The source of everything that is wrong with our political life." A first-rate muckraker, she is also a reporter who does her homework; arguably, few other journalists work the often dreary topic of campaign finance reform with as much style and insight. She must also be one of the bravest writers in Texas, consistently taking on that state's "blue-bellied, wall-eyed, lithium-deprived Texas lunatics" with her trademark mix of folksy irreverence and scathing commentary. This collection solidifies Ivins's ranking as among the cleverest humorists of the day. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
An outrageous, penetrating, fun collection of articles from three-time Pulitzer Prize winner Ivins. As political columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram Ivins is a human oxymoron: a Texas liberal. Her down-home, good-olþ-girl style thinly cloaks a wicked wit wielded in support of strong political beliefs. While Ivins sees the purpose of journalism as being "to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable," her appeal is nevertheless very broad for a simple reason. Unlike many of her conservative peers, Ivins actually likes people, even the politicians she has made a career of skewering. She genuinely enjoys life in a "nation undeterred by reality" and a political system that "requires a certain relish for confusion." The refreshing thing about Ivins is that she not only sees the normally harmless lunacy that surrounds her, she appreciates it; rather than clucking about the downfall of social values or despairing over cultural demise, she is ready to grab a beer and watch the real world go by. While this volume is an enjoyable mechanism for obtaining a larger-than-usual dosage of Ivins's humor, however, the inevitable choppiness of a series of short essays on disparate topics makes for a somewhat disappointing book. Insofar as there is a continuing theme, itþs the corrosive effect of money in politics and the need for campaign finance reform. On this subject she cuts to the bottom line: The millions special interests invest in political campaigns are amply rewarded, and "the rest of us get stuck with that much more of the tab for keeping the country running. " For Ivins it is time to recognize the necessity of publicly financed elections if we wantpoliticians dancing with the public rather than special interests. Entertaining, regardless of your politics. (Author tour)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679754879
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1999
Pages:
250
Sales rank:
1,384,015
Product dimensions:
5.17(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.62(d)

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