You Gotta Have Heart: A History of Washington Baseball from 1859 to the 2012 National League East Champions [NOOK Book]

Overview

“First in War, First in Peace . . . and Last in the American League.” Expressions such as this characterized the legend and lore of baseball in the nation's capital, from the pioneering Washington Nationals of 1859 to the Washington Senators, whose ignominious departure in 1971 left Washingtonians bereft of the national pastime for thirty-three years. This reflective book gives the complete history of the game in the D.C. area, including the 1924 World Series championship team and the Homestead Grays, the perennial Negro League pennant winners
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You Gotta Have Heart: A History of Washington Baseball from 1859 to the 2012 National League East Champions

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Overview

“First in War, First in Peace . . . and Last in the American League.” Expressions such as this characterized the legend and lore of baseball in the nation's capital, from the pioneering Washington Nationals of 1859 to the Washington Senators, whose ignominious departure in 1971 left Washingtonians bereft of the national pastime for thirty-three years. This reflective book gives the complete history of the game in the D.C. area, including the 1924 World Series championship team and the Homestead Grays, the perennial Negro League pennant winners from the late 1930s to the mid-1940s who consistently outplayed the Senators. New chapters describe the present-day Nationals, who, in 2012, won the National League East led by the arms of Gio Gonzalez and Stephen Strasburg and the bats of Ryan Zimmerman, Adam LaRoche and rookie Bryce Harper. The book is filled with the voices of current and former players, along with presidents, senators, and political commentators who call the team their own.
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Editorial Reviews

Bob Carpenter
Washington baseball history is full of characters: from Dummy Hoy to The Big Train, from Sam Rice to Ted Williams, Frank Robinson to Stephen Strasburg and Bryce Harper. You Gotta Have Heart is a fun read as diverse and adventurous as the capital city itself. Stroll down the Boulevard de Base Ball and revisit the Golden Age of the ’20s, the brilliance of the Negro Leagues, and the loss of the Senators, twice! The new Nationals aren't going anywhere, and neither are you once you pick up this gem. Good luck putting it down!
Jerry Seib
For those of us who sat watching the Washington Nationals before they became good—and were grateful for the opportunity—and who drive by the site of the old Griffith Stadium wondering what it was like in the really old days of Washington baseball, Fred Frommer’s authoritative history is an absolute treat—as it will be for anybody who just happens to like a good baseball yarn.
George F. Will
The national pastime has a rich history in the nation's capital, and Frederic Frommer tells this fascinating story splendidly. No fan's library should be without this book.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781589798441
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/21/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 280
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Frederic J. Frommer is an AP writer and the author of The Washington Baseball Fan’s Little Book of Wisdom and co-author of Red Sox vs. Yankees: The Great Rivalry and Growing Up Baseball. He lives in Washington with his wife and two sons.
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Table of Contents

Foreword by Bob Schieffer, CBS News chief Washington correspondent
Chapter 1: Beginnings
Chapter 2: Washington’s Only Championship
Chapter 3: Glory Years
Chapter 4: Red, White, and Gray: Washington’s Negro League Team
Chapter 5: Hail to the Pitch: Presidents and Senators
Chapter 6: Futility
Chapter 7: A Doomed Rebirth: The Expansion Senators
Chapter 8: A Short Run: The Ted Williams Era
Chapter 9: Fans, Moments, and Memories
Chapter 10: The Washington Nationals: Baseball Returns
Chapter 11: Political Baseball: The Nationals Fan Base
Chapter 12: From First to Last: A National Resurgence
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 4, 2013

    As a fan of the national pastime, Baseball for those who have no

    As a fan of the national pastime, Baseball for those who have not heard it called that, You Gotta Have Heart is an interesting read.  The history of baseball in the nation’s capital is well covered and an important part of baseball history.  Frommer takes the reader through the ups and downs of any ball team that fans everywhere understand and live with even if it is frustrating at times.  

    An interesting part of the book is the history of the early players and the ones that I remember from my childhood reading about in the newspaper and their on field exploits.  It is also interesting to see that the fans of Washington, D.C. stuck behind the team through the good and the bad times.  It seems that the team was one of the things that held a transient population together.  Even today’s politicians can leave the haggling over differences in beliefs and come together and enjoy a baseball game or simply sit and discuss a game or the team.  Baseball can be a unifying and bring diverse people together.
     
    The book ends with 2012 season when the Nationals made it to the playoffs.  Rather the Senators of old or the new Nationals the area around D.C. fell in love with the team and we can only hope that they continue to have a long run in the capital city.  An very interesting and satisfying read.

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