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You, Me and the Big Blue Sea
     

You, Me and the Big Blue Sea

by Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick
 

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When Mother tells her young son about a sea voyage they took some years earlier she adds, "but you were only a baby, you wouldn't remember." But, as the reader soon discovers, the boy has quite vivid memories—of increasingly hilarious goings-on that made no impression whatsoever on his amusingly oblivious mother and aunt.

Overview

When Mother tells her young son about a sea voyage they took some years earlier she adds, "but you were only a baby, you wouldn't remember." But, as the reader soon discovers, the boy has quite vivid memories—of increasingly hilarious goings-on that made no impression whatsoever on his amusingly oblivious mother and aunt.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Kirkus Reviews

A mother underestimates her yo

ung son’s memory in Fitzpatrick’s inventive offering. . . . Fitzgerald’s illustrations work in tandem with the text and are notable in their attention to detail. Children will enjoy pointing out the activity in each scene, making this a good choice for lap sharing.

Booklist

This charming, frisky tale begins as a mother reminds her son about a trip they took across the ocean. . . . This is a smooth blend of text and art, but the pictures are particularly fine, expertly executed, rich with color, and full of surprises.

School Library Journal

The repetitive, engaging text has a musical quality and lovely rhythm while the illustrations lend a child's perspective as readers feel the enormity of the rolling seas and the details of the ship through the discovering eyes of a child. Simple and beautiful seagulls fly on the warm endpapers. A lovely addition

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-In this simple story set around the turn of the 19th century, a mother shares a photo album with her young son, reminiscing about their voyage across the sea. On each spread, she remembers things they did, saw, and heard, in the form of a lyrical question, followed by "But you were only a baby. You wouldn't remember." The watercolor illustrations suggest the boy remembers more than she thinks, as readers see them eating at the captain's table, weathering a storm, and watching the birds, all from the point of view of the child. The repetitive, engaging text has a musical quality and lovely rhythm while the illustrations lend a child's perspective as readers feel the enormity of the rolling seas and the details of the ship through the discovering eyes of a child. Simple and beautiful seagulls fly on warm endpapers. A lovely addition.-Leslie Barban, Richland County Public Library, Columbia, SC Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A mother underestimates her young son�s memory in Fitzpatrick�s (I�m a Tiger Too!, p. 410, etc.) inventive offering. "When you were a baby we went to sea, didn�t we?" Fitzgerald begins, "You, Aunt Alice and me, all three. And a big, big trunk. But you were only a baby. You wouldn�t remember." The opening spread reveals the Victorian-era scene as the pair share a scrapbook of the journey. Meanwhile, Fitzgerald�s luminous watercolors tell the story from the child�s perspective and reveal what really happened in alternating three-quarter-page spreads and framed vignettes. For example, the baby sees a deck hand drop the open trunk, but the mother doesn�t notice because her back is turned; opposite, stockings and other garments drift to sea in a thumbnail sketch. In the spread that follows ("We waved bye-bye, didn�t we? Then we were away, just like that, without any fuss,") the baby bids adieu to a crewmember as he falls overboard. The format repeats throughout—mother�s story, refrain ("But you were only a baby. / You wouldn�t remember") and child�s-eye view. Fitzgerald�s illustrations work in tandem with the text and are notable in their attention to detail. Children will enjoy pointing out the activity in each scene, making this a good choice for lap sharing. Unfortunately, the repetitive text—the very device on which the story hangs—soon wears thin, the set-up condescending. Although the now school-age child is capable of giving voice to his own experience, he remains silent throughout. He�ll have to rely on the audience to do the talking for him. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761316916
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
10/01/2002
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.56(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick is the author/illustrator of Lizzy and Skunk, an SLJ Best Book of the Year, and I'm a Tiger Too, from Roaring Brook Press. She lives in Ireland.

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