You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: A Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder

You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: A Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder

4.3 49
by Kate Kelly, Peggy Ramundo
     
 

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With You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults.

Overview

With You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!, Kelly and Ramundo bring together their considerable personal and professional experiences to create the essential guide to identifying, understanding and managing the dynamics of ADD in adults.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781882522002
Publisher:
Tyrell & Jerem Press
Publication date:
01/01/1993
Pages:
350

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You Mean I'm Not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?!: The Classic Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
roadtreker1100 More than 1 year ago
Initially the book was compelling and very informative but at some point the book transitioned from a readable one to becoming a reference book. It is hard for people like myself who have AD/HD to incorporate too much detail without becoming bored. Especially if not every subject discussed applies to the individual reader. But in spite of this I felt the book was well worth the price. I was especially impressed with the explanations of subjects that I was already familiar with because they contained more content which I felt enriched my understanding of already familiar subjects. The most positive experience I came out with was that I'm not from Mars and I'm not alone! The authors seem to be intimately familiar with the subject. Not at all shooting from the hip. In my opinion, to write a book that informs and educates and yet retains it's readability is not an easy thing to do? But it's not impossible! Perhaps the publishers are getting in the way because they're insisting on books that appeal to a larger audience in order to boost sales? Personally, I long for the day when books that educate read more like compelling novels that inspire!
C8H10N4O2 More than 1 year ago
I'm not going to go into an indepth review of the book. If you want that, check out the physical book reviews. The ebook formatting is rough on this one at times. I've compared how it reads on my nook compared to the physical edition. The pictures are really small on here, which I don't find to be a huge deal because I don't really care about the "cute" little pictures, but it is kind of annoying. The biggest problem though, is when the book is supposed to have a table/list of things. The entries get all jumbled and it's nearly impossible to sort through and figure out what the intended formatting is. Words get jumbled and condensed together as well only adding to the frustration that is. I would not recommend the ebook format of this book. 3.5-4 stars for the book, but only 1 obligatory star for the ebook version.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book. The first book I ever bought that talked about add/adhd from BOTH sides of the story, the doctor AND the patient. The women who wrote this book work with addults (their word for adult add people) and are themselves. if a an excellent book
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CasualUnclutterer More than 1 year ago
Anyone who thinks s/he has ADD/ADHD, anyone who knows s/he has ADD/ADHD, and anyone who is close, personally or professionally, with someone who has ADD/ADHD can benefit from this book. It's a great first step to understanding the possible symptoms and effects of the disorder. It's a great first step to admitting you might be affected by the disorder. It's a map for getting help and helping yourself. What makes it so valuable is the fact that it's written by two women who are themselves ADD-abled and who are now life coaches for those living with such differences. And it's real - these women aren't always waving pom-poms, claiming the work you'll have to do, the challenges you face, are not really a big deal. They admit the process of learning to truly live with ADD/ADHD can be frightening and hard. Bu they are convincing that the struggle is worthwhile. Another reviewer pointed out that the medical sections are outdated. That is a very practical and true observation. But the general point that someone with ADD/ADHD shouldn't automatically reject medication is nonetheless valid. Lauren Williams, Casual Uncluttering LLC, Woodinville, WA, USA
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