Overview

A startling, remarkable poetry memoir of love and pain, hurt and recovery.

For three years, Eireann Corrigan was in and out of treatment facilities for her eating disorders. By the time she graduated high school, her doctors said she was going to die if things didn't change. That July, her high school boyfriend attempted suicide. In one gunshot moment, everything was altered.
In a striking and vivid voice, ...
See more details below
You Remind Me of You

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$7.99 List Price

Overview

A startling, remarkable poetry memoir of love and pain, hurt and recovery.

For three years, Eireann Corrigan was in and out of treatment facilities for her eating disorders. By the time she graduated high school, her doctors said she was going to die if things didn't change. That July, her high school boyfriend attempted suicide. In one gunshot moment, everything was altered.
In a striking and vivid voice, Eireann Corrigan recounts these events, finding meaning in the hurt, humor in the horror, and grace in the struggle that life demands. You Remind Me of You is a testament to the binding ties of love and pain, and the strange paths we take to recovery.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Corrigan, now in her 20s, recounts her experiences as a teenager with an eating disorder in a series of poems distinguished more by the shock value of their contents than by their insight or literary merit. Along with the graphic details of the adolescent Corrigan's secret stockpiles of sealed plastic bags containing her regurgitated meals and her ruses in feigning weight gain, topics include her high school boyfriend Daniel, who shoots himself between the eyes only to have the bullet ricochet out of an eye socket, leaving him alive and, eventually, able to function. Corrigan, still severely anorexic, is with another boyfriend, Ben, when the suicide attempt takes place, but she rushes to Daniel's bedside, aids in his slow recovery and realizes she wants to recover, too. (At some point Ben fatally drives his car into a tree.) Frequent attempts at irony don't deflect from the writer's absorption in her symptoms. Various incidents are rehashed repeatedly, even aggrandized (e.g., comparisons of herself and Daniel to Orpheus and Eurydice), but more fundamental narrative questions receive little attention: why, after all, do these individuals suffer in these particular ways? Corrigan acknowledges that her illness includes elements of competitiveness (as an inpatient, she and her fellows envy the clavicle of a particularly skeletal girl) and exhibitionism ("I wore sleeveless dresses even with scars on my wrists"); both these elements seem fully exploited here. Ages 13-up. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is a poetry memoir about the author's struggle with eating disorders, the attempted suicide of her high school boyfriend and how love and pain lead to recovery. The first poems give an indication of the upcoming struggles as she and her boyfriend reminisce about their rocky relationship. Frequent references to the differences between his Jewish traditions and her Catholic background are expressed in the poems. They continue to see each other despite these differences and become intimate. The poems are an important part of the author's recovery as they chronicle her struggle with herself, her family and her friends. She shares intimate details about her eating habits, her hospitalization and her successful rehabilitation. The circumstances of her boyfriend's attempted suicide are obscure, but her devotion and visits are clearly described. Her college experiences are combined with emotional swings, which are mixed with past and current events. I found the memoirs interesting as a diary but the poetry is rather depressing for an outsider, yet has the potential of being therapeutic for someone who has shared the author's experiences. The author is open and honest about her condition, but with humor and grace the strange path to recovery becomes evident. 2002, PUSH/Scholastic, $6.99. Ages 15 up. Reviewer: Karen Werner
KLIATT
This memoir, told in free-verse poems that last from one to three pages, swirls with emotion and pain. Eireann, the "I," addresses Daniel, the "you." Through the years of their relationship, they are friends and lovers, but also something else—something that cryptically links the violence they each inflict upon themselves. She has eating disorders, bad enough to be hospitalized; he attempts suicide, brought on by some combination of mania, depression, and LSD. Each of them is haunted by the other, haunted by love, guilt, and a fierce interconnectedness. Some poems are her thoughts, some are details of a particular day or interaction, some intermingle both; others are the dialogue between her and an unnamed therapist, never quite in sync—or is the dialogue mixed with thoughts? In what ways is Eireann helped or hurt by Daniel, and vice versa? Questions and musings are more available than answers, which are cryptic and elusive. Intense emotional pain and the graphic details of Daniel's failed suicide attempt make for a disturbing read, but no more disturbing than real life. Each poem has a title, many brilliant. Readers willing to navigate the story's ricocheting timeline will be profoundly rewarded. (Editors' note: see the article on page 3 of this issue for more information about this kind of poetry.) Category: Biography & Personal Narrative. KLIATT Codes: S*—Exceptional book, recommended for senior high school students. 2002, Scholastic, Push, 124p., , Simmons College, Boston
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-In this eloquent and moving poetic memoir, Corrigan recounts her descent into anorexia. In and out of hospitals and treatment facilities for several years, she was unconvinced that her life was worth sustaining despite the frantic efforts of her family and boyfriend. She hid her vomit in plastic bags and buried them in the yard, and took dramatic measures to falsify her progress during weigh-ins. Corrigan was dancing with oneboyfriend when another one unsuccessfully attempted suicide and when she read the newspaper detailing the event, she rushed to Daniel's bedside. She then bargained for his life-she would eat if he would live, and he did. Their slow recoveries parallel their growing deep love for one another, and they clung to one another for support, and comfort, and in sexual intimacy. The author's prose poetry is interspersed with interviews between herself and an unnamed therapist. The unusual and effective format sharpens each word, making readers savor and thoughtfully examine each poetic piece. They will also have to hold each puzzlelike entry into open space before judging which piece describes which point in time, given the loose, nonlinear framework. Overall, this book strongly complements the many fiction and nonfiction works on the topic.-Susan Riley, Mount Kisco Public Library, NY Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545345965
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/21/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 639,215
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 10 MB

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Rosencrans 4th Period

    I read the book You Remind Me of You by Eireann Corrigan, and this was one most eye opener books I have ever taken an interest in reading. This novel is about a girl names Eireann Corrigan who was in and out of eating disorder treatment centers for about three years. At this point, her doctors were telling her if things didn't change, she wont be alive for her high school graduation. Her boyfriend attempted sucide, and after this incident everything changed in a blink of an eye. Eireann started to find the meaning of life, love and the struggle that life demands. This book ties love and pain and the strange paths we all take to recovery. This book has multiple emotions, but is very touching but heartbreaking at the same time. There were multiple times where i couldn't hold back the tears. This novel is very honest and profound. It doesn't hold anything back. I loved this book, I always enjoy reading books that are writing in unique forms such as this one. Overall I would give this book a 9 and would encourage anyone to read this book. It opens your eyes and see what and eating disorder can do to the mind and the body.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2011

    Excalent Book!

    I usually hate reading till I started to read "You Remind Me of You". It was the first poetry book I had every read and now I am in love with poetry books such as this on. I would recamend it to almost anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2010

    AP English Review

    Through an accumulation of poems, Eireann Corrigan tells of a catastrophic time in her life. Although she was still young when the book was initially published, Corrigan shares the struggles she endured during and immediately after her years of high school. Battling a severe case of bulimia nervosa might be enough to shake up the world of a teen girl, but add to that the attempted suicide of her ex-boyfriend Daniel and the guilt which she carries. Most memories include a hospital. Corrigan spends most her time in the hospital with other girls facing eating disorders. Daniel spends time in a hospital in a coma after his failed suicide attempt which put him in a coma. Corrigan then spends her time waiting at Daniel's bedside as he slowly he recovers. Young and compassionate, Corrigan does not give up faith in the recovery of her beloved Daniel. Through the recovery of Daniel, Corrigan finds the strength in herself to uphold the same support for Daniel as he did for her through her struggles. The details in the memoir are not very descriptive, yet there is nothing lacking. All that needs to be expressed is well done through simple word choices with deeper meanings. Corrigan's concise memoir depicting her tragic years upon entering adulthood is heart wrenching and truly captures the heart of readers who sympathize with the struggles Corrigan has faced and conquered.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2008

    Great Book

    I loved this book and purchased it along with 'Soul of Mature Adolescence'. Both were very interesting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2007

    Best Read Ever

    Truly the best novel I've ever read. It's both touching and heart breaking. It's amazingly honost and profound. It happens to be the only book I've ever read twice. I had most of my friends read it and have yet found anybody who hasn't enjoyed it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2006

    Emotionally draining

    This was the single most depressing book I have ever read in my life. It is the story about a young girl beginning the battle of eating disorders and watching her as her world comes crashing down around her. This book grabs the fear and depression in any person and brings it to the surface for a personal reconcilation. As sad and hopeless as this book can make the reader feel at times it also offers another look into the world and almost makes everything look a little bit better. I do not advise this book for anyone who is dealing with any emotional upsets presently. As well as anyone under the age of 18. I loved this book, but it will be awhile before I can read it again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2005

    Is your life this bad??

    This book is heart-wrenching! There are parts where i couldn't hold back the tears. This is a must read. GIves you insight on what someone has to deal with to be happy with themselves!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2004

    Enjoyed this item

    Found this book to be a great representation of the perspective presented.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2004

    A good read

    A really great book. I read the book in one day since it was short and easy to read seeing that the book read like short poems. If you're looking for a detailed book about anorexia, this isn't it. This book is about a teenage girls life that just so happens to have anorexia. It was still a book that is worth the money you'll spend!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2003

    I loved it!

    ive read it so many times and it just keeps getting better. it was the first book i read that was all in poems. its sad but its wonderful. <3

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2003

    Wonderful... helped me a lot.

    I loved this book. It was easy to relate to. It is helping me a lot in my recovery and I recommend it for anyone who is in recovery for an Eating Disorder.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2002

    great book

    I liked it. It was good "poetry". I hestate using that word because in many poems, it was like the author just wrote it straight out and then added all the line breaks. This didn't make it bad though. I love this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2002

    a review from one of corrigan's students

    an amazingly powerful book. the author herself is a wonderful person, and this book contains her very soul

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2002

    Sad, Beautiful

    I read this book in one sitting. I wasn't sure what i was in for. I was expecting the usual anti-eatingdisorder preaching but the author was subtle. her writing was approachable and it has stuck with me. a truly beautiful peice of work. so sad.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2002

    Unbelievably Beautiful

    Corrigan's moving and beautifully descriptive poetry is like nothing I have read before. Her words create such concrete imagery and take the reader to the scene, placing us in the moment completely. Those images and moments stay with you long after you have read each piece, prompting you to return for another glimpse into her world. She has an incredible knack for blending her painful story with bits of humor, keeping it all rooted firmly in reality. I love her work! I cannot wait to see more from her.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2002

    You Remind Me of Great Reading

    At its heart a moving drama of love, death and rebirth (sort of Plath meets Lazarus), Corrigan¿s book is also an unintended antidote for the millions of girls poisoned by the desire for the unattainable abs of the modern pop princess (Starve me, baby, one more time?). For this work, Corrigan chose a writing style that allows her to capture the subtle nuances of pain, hope and helplessness, while remaining accessible to the anguished pre-teens for whom the story serves as warning. More than just offering the reader good literature, the author performs a great service by giving us a window into her pain. It is a poetic confession that leaves us, the readers, aware of our own need for penance. In some of its early scenes, the story becomes the most modern of fairy tales. While dragons once locked damsels in towers, today we find anorexia chaining distressed heroines in hospital wards. While true love used to ride to the rescue, the prince now gets stoned in his car. Corrigan later becomes the prince herself, waking her beloved from a very different kind of enchanted sleep. As the narrator grows back into an adult from her anorexia-imposed state of physical infancy, the tone matures as well. In a culture awash in ¿reality programming,¿ Corrigan¿s book proves as poignant, poetic, and real as anything I have watched or heard in years.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2002

    I loved this book!

    this book was so well done. her poetry is so descriptive, the story practicaly flows like water. the style it's written in is very unique and i enjoyed it very much. everyone should read this book!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 20 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)