You Shouldn't Call Me Mommy

You Shouldn't Call Me Mommy

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by Susan Tsui
     
 

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Orphaned as a little boy, Jay was raised by an artificial parent to become an upstanding member of society. Jay's older brother Ian still remembers their real parents and has never understood Jay's connection to his nanny-bot. When Ian betrays Jay in the worst way possible the two finally part.

Fourteen years later Ian returns, desperate for help. Can Jay save his

Overview

Orphaned as a little boy, Jay was raised by an artificial parent to become an upstanding member of society. Jay's older brother Ian still remembers their real parents and has never understood Jay's connection to his nanny-bot. When Ian betrays Jay in the worst way possible the two finally part.

Fourteen years later Ian returns, desperate for help. Can Jay save his older brother while holding onto the memories of his mother? More importantly, does Jay even want to?

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
In a future where artificial humans have become common household helpers, a government-employed therapist must question his faith in the system he has long supported. Orphaned at a young age, Jay was raised by a "humaniform," a robot programmed as a caretaker. Jay's older brother, Ian, was 18 when their parents died. Jay loved his robotic mother, and he feels abandoned and betrayed by Ian, who hates humaniforms. When Ian reappears in Jay's life, he asks Jay to testify that Ian is a responsible enough father to take custody of his children without the help of a humaniform. Jay hopes that Ian might learn to accept humaniforms. But Ian persists in trying to prove that the robots and the government that provides them--the government that Jay works for--are both corrupt and dangerous. As Ian tries to influence Jay's life, Jay realizes that his wife, Sasha, may not be as sympathetic toward his work as she had always appeared. In order to defend his own position, and protect his childhood memories, Jay must probe into the workings of his world--and he begins to see that there is a sinister element behind his apparently benevolent government. Though Tsui's setting may not hold up to deep analysis, Jay's imperfect understanding of it allows readers to see the world through a filtered lens--and share Jay's horror as he unravels the truth behind the system he thought he knew. His relationships, with humans and humaniforms alike, are genuine in their complexity, and as Jay begins to understand the truth, he ultimately learns how much he values his loved ones. Questions of human identity, illusion versus reality and the types of sacrifice required for true caregiving continually move the story forward. A compelling narrator drives this strong, sympathetic tale that begets metaphysical soul-searching.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780985667603
Publisher:
Onieros Press
Publication date:
06/28/2012
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.63(d)

Meet the Author

Susan Tsui was born in New York City, the third of four children born to Chinese immigrant parents, and the first to be born in the United States. Recognizing an interest in the effects of culture, society, technology, and literature on the human condition Susan obtained an MFA from Goddard College. During her writing career she has published short stories in Expanded Horizons, Mind Flights, and the third annual Warrior WiseWomen anthology. She plans to follow-up on these early achievements with the publication of full length novels, starting with You Shouldn’t Call Me Mommy.

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You Shouldn't Call Me Mommy 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
REW1 More than 1 year ago
I received an advance readers copy of this book and I have to say I love it. Susan Tsui has a subtle writing style that delves into the relationships between people, especially family. Jay and Ian are estrange brothers that must suddenly deal with their past when Ian has to go to his brother for help. Throughout the story, I found myself first deeply routed on Jay's side and then as time when found myself on Ian's side. Tsui really does a great job of taking the reader through the narrow to more broaden views Jay has top open himself up to see. I especially loved the ending, and how we're never sure exactly what decision Jay is going to make until that last moment. Great book.
LisaBatyaFeld More than 1 year ago
I love it when authors show all the troubling complexity that ripples out from one change in our society. When robots can serve as caretakers, what's lost and what's gained in terms of human compassion and our sense of responsibility to take real care of the people in our lives? (Especially when those relationships are painful or frustrating...) The worldbuilding here is incredibly rich. More than that, Susan Tsui's deft touch in scene after scene made me bleed for the characters. I'm a sucker for family stories, where no one knows better how to push your buttons than the people who installed them in the first place, and Susan's writing doesn't disappoint. This is definitely worth reading... and reading again.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a good novel. I liked it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago