Overview

For a charming girl and an endearing mutt, friendship is just around the . . . hedge. These two lonely souls sit just opposite each other: She pining after a parade of passing dogs, he pining after a parade of passing owners. Until--finally--the girl and the mutt spot each other. You? they ask. You! they shout.
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You?

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Overview

For a charming girl and an endearing mutt, friendship is just around the . . . hedge. These two lonely souls sit just opposite each other: She pining after a parade of passing dogs, he pining after a parade of passing owners. Until--finally--the girl and the mutt spot each other. You? they ask. You! they shout.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

A joyous ode to the love of dogs, Radunsky's (The Mighty Asparagus) latest is even bilingual-the dogs' barks have been translated from "dog-ese" into English by Radunsky's "learned dog, Tsetsa." A scruffy brown-and-white mutt hangs around the park looking for an owner, falling in love with every dog-walking human who walks by. On the bench opposite, a big-eyed girl in a polka-dot shift sees the same passersby, but she's interested in the dogs. The dog's wishes are occasionally self-defeating, but more than anything they express his excitable nature ("And what about you, Mr. Whitepants? You already have a dog, too? It looks like everybody has a dog these days"). By contrast, the girl's thoughts are marked by a sense of wonder ("Wow! You're a roller-skating dog! I want you"). Painted with gouache on tea-colored paper, Radunsky's figures are lumpy, colorful shapes accentuated with calligraphic scrawls and curls of black ink, giving them a hapless, lovable look. Visual cues make it clear these two are meant for each other, and the exciting finale in which they meet will be hard to resist. Ages 3-7. (May)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Radunsky's love of dogs is evident from his dedication. He even notes that the book is: "Translated from Dog-ese to English by my learned dog, Tsetsa." The two main characters, a dog and a girl, are both alone and forlorn in the park. The dog's thoughts are translated in speech balloons from barks and yips. As he watches possible owners go by, he notes sadly that they all already have dogs. The girl would really like to have any of the passing dogs, but they all have owners. Finally the girl and dog see each other. Their joy as they meet across the final double page is evident, as their tentative "Woof?" and "You?" is answered emphatically "Woof!" and "You!" The smiling girl and the dog appear on the jacket with the title question; on the cover we see them from a different angle, as she seems to puzzle over the question. Loosely applied gouache paint and inked lines on textured handmade paper depict only the characters and a few trees. But with this the artist manages to create a humorous story with very human emotions. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
A lonely dog that has no owner comes to the park. He barks, "Woof!" and we read what he is saying with his bark. He is unhappy because he doesn't belong to anyone. A girl comes to the park alone and we read her thoughts. She is unhappy because she hasn't a dog or friends. Separately, they each see various dogs and their owners. As the dogs come by, the lonely dog cannot find an owner who wants another dog, and the girl wishes she could have each dog she sees. They finally see each other, and the cute ending shows them jumping with joy at finding each other with a "Woof!" and a "You!" Short and simple dialogue with sketchy illustrations aptly present the situations. Children will enjoy the humorous array of dogs and their owners and reading the comments made by the dog and the little girl. This is a engaging book to read aloud to young children. Reviewer: Vicki Foote
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 2

Radunsky offers up a riff on Chris Raschka's Yo! Yes? (Scholastic, 1993). Both stories deal with two lonely souls divided by the book's gutter, and it isn't until one character crosses over the boundary that they discover happiness. In Raschka's case, the protagonists are boys, and the dialogue is comprised of 34 words. Radunsky populates a park with a dog and a girl on opposite sides of a hedge. The two are arrayed in white (fur and a dress, respectively) with taupe spots/polka dots; the child's movements subtly mirror the dog's. Their clipped sentences, filled with longing, are directed at the owners and pets who parade past. (The author credits his own pooch with "the translation from Dog-ese to English.") Comic relief comes from the odd combinations of people and pups that pass by, the quickly shifting loyalties of the two lead characters as they imagine life with the objects of their affection, and the antics of the canine hero. In watching a woman and her six shaggy bundles of energy, he barks: "What are those? Crows? Flying mops? Look, I can fly, too!" He careens off the bench looking very silly indeed. Tan, handmade paper provides a warm background for the gouache figures. Rough edges and an overlay of quick, loose lines produce a vitality that is well suited to this tale. Any child who has ever wanted a pet or experienced loneliness will rejoice at the climax. Perfect for storytimes and laps; even better with pups.-Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

Kirkus Reviews
A scruffy little white-with-brown-spots mutt is alone in the park. "Woof, woof, bow wow, arf, arf, bow wow!" he says (translation is thoughtfully provided: "Here I am, alone in the park. No owner. No leash. No collar"). A dark-haired girl in a white-with-brown-polka-dots dress is similarly alone, although she speaks English. They are separated by a hedge that runs along the gutter. Congenial human-dog pairs pass by, page by page, and with each turn, dog and girl wish wistfully that the owner (or dog) belonged to them. Radunsky makes the most of his canvas, the dog, girl and bits of shrubbery and park furniture static elements in the tableaux as the happy pairs pass by. Thin, energetic lines define the forms minimally on gouache blobs of color, all arrayed on a generous expanse of buff-colored handmade paper. Although the end is never in doubt, the creative owner-and-dog couples (one roller-blading woman is accompanied by an Afghan that sports roller blades on each paw) and the heartfelt, plaintive dialogue will hold readers' interest, and the wait makes the inevitable discovery-"Woof! YOU!"-all the sweeter. (Picture book. 3-7)
From the Publisher
"Painted with gouache on tea-colored paper, Radunsky's figures are lumpy, colorful shapes accentuated with calligraphic scrawls and curls of black ink, giving them a hapless, lovable look. Visual cues make it clear these two are meant for each other, and the exciting finale in which they meet will be hard to resist."—Publishers Weekly
 
"The juxtaposition of the dog and girl’s efforts on opposite pages effectively frames their appeals. Insets translate the dog dialogue; for example, “Arf! Woof! Bow wow really means, “Wait! Come and lean on me, grandma! Your old dog could lean on me, too!” Brush-stroked images in gouache on handmade paper are just off-kilter enough to feel both endearing and spontaneous. A tail-wagging good tale."—Booklist
 
"Radunsky makes the most of his canvas, the dog, girl and bits of shrubbery and park furniture static elements in the tableaux as the happy pairs pass by. Thin, energetic lines define the forms minimally on gouache blobs of color, all arrayed on a generous expanse of buff-colored handmade paper. Although the end is never in doubt, the creative owner-and-dog couples (one roller-blading woman is accompanied by an Afghan that sports roller blades on each paw) and the heartfelt, plaintive dialogue will hold readers’ interest, and the wait makes the inevitable discovery—“Woof! YOU!”—all the sweeter."—Kirkus Reviews
 

"Tan, handmade paper provides a warm background for the gouache figures. Rough edges and an overlay of quick, loose lines produce a vitality that is well suited to this tale. Any child who has ever wanted a pet or experienced loneliness will rejoice at the climax. Perfect for storytimes and laps; even better with pups."—School Library Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547546940
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 5/4/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • File size: 47 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

VLADIMIR RADUNSKY is the author and illustrator of many beloved books for children and dogs, including The Mighty Asparagus, a New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Book of the Year, and Because . . . by Mikhail Baryshnikov, a New York Times bestseller. He lives in Massachusetts.

www.vladimirradunsky.com

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