Young Adult Science Fiction

Overview

At the close of the nineteenth century, American youths developed a growing interest in electricity and its applications, machines, and gadgetry. When authors and publishers recognized the extent of this interest in technology, they sought to create reading materials that would meet this market need. The result was science fiction written especially for young adults. While critics tended to neglect young adult science fiction for decades, they gradually came to recognize its practical and cultural value. Science ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $97.57   
  • New (4) from $120.55   
  • Used (5) from $97.57   
Sending request ...

Overview

At the close of the nineteenth century, American youths developed a growing interest in electricity and its applications, machines, and gadgetry. When authors and publishers recognized the extent of this interest in technology, they sought to create reading materials that would meet this market need. The result was science fiction written especially for young adults. While critics tended to neglect young adult science fiction for decades, they gradually came to recognize its practical and cultural value. Science fiction inspired many young adults to study science and engineering and helped foster technological innovation. At the same time, these works also explored cultural and social concerns more commonly associated with serious literature. Nor was young adult science fiction a peculiarly American phenomenon: authors in other countries likewise wrote science fiction for young adult readers. This book examines young adult science fiction in the U.S. and several other countries and explores issues central to the genre.

The first part of the book treats the larger contexts of young adult science fiction and includes chapters on its history and development. Included are discussions of science fiction for young adults in the U.S. and in Canada, Great Britain, Germany, and Australia. These chapters are written by expert contributors and chart the history of young adult science fiction from the nineteenth century to the present. The second section of the book considers topics of special interest to young adult science fiction. Some of the chapters look at particular forms and expressions of science fiction, such as films and comic books. Others treat particular topics, such as the portrayal of women in Robert Heinlein's works and representations of war in young adult science fiction. Yet another chapter studies the young adult science fiction novel as a coming-of-age story and thus helps distinguish the genre from science fiction written for adult readers. All chapters reflect current research, and the volume concludes with extensive bibliographies.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Unlike that Sullivan edited and Greenwood published in 1993, the collection here is topic centered rather than author centered. Among the 12 essays are explorations of women in Heinlein's juveniles, war, film, comic books, and criticism and other secondary material. Others look at the field in the US before and after World War II, Canada, Britain, Germany, and Australia. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)
Internet Book Watch
Sullivan's Young Adult Science Fiction includes the work of a number of well-known SF critics and is thus more complicated reading than the other works discussed above. . The book has two aims, to present historical and contemporary overviews of national SF literatures for children and young adults, and to present critical, contextualizing, thematic overviews of bodies of these SF sub genres. The book in divided into three parts, with essays in parts one and two divided along the ideas stated above, the third, a bibliography by Mike Levy, well-known as a scholarly of children's and Young Adult fiction as well as science fiction. This is entitled: "Science Fiction for Children and Young Adults: Criticism and Other Secondary Materials," and is both reliable and exhaustive in making suggestions for background material on individual authors and more generally on YA and Children's SF.
—Internet Book Watch
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

C.W. SULLIVAN III is Professor of English at East Carolina University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction: Extrapolation and the Young Adult Reader 1
1 American Technological Fiction for Youth: 1900-1940 7
2 American Young Adult Science Fiction Since 1947 21
3 Young Adult Science Fiction in Canada 37
4 The Janus Perspective: Science Fiction and the Young Adult Reader in Britain 55
5 German Science Fiction for Young Adults 73
6 Australian Science Fiction for Children and Adolescents: 1940-1990 85
7 The Young Adult Science Fiction Novel as Bildungsroman 99
8 Women in Heinlein's Juveniles 119
9 Young Adults, Science Fiction, and War 131
10 No Grownups, Please: A Study of the American Science Fiction Film 147
11 Science Fiction in Comic Books: Science Fiction Colonizes a Fantasy Medium 161
12 Science Fiction for Children and Young Adults: Criticism and Other Secondary Materials 185
Index 241
About the Editor and Contributors 245
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)