BN.com Gift Guide

Young Heroes of the Bible: A Book for Family Sharing

Overview

Actor Kirk Douglas retells five Old Testament stories in which Abraham, Rebecca, Joseph, Miriam and David perform heroic deeds in their youth. Lively illustrations accompany each story. Perfect for family sharing.

Retells five Old Testament stories in which Abraham, Rebecca, Joseph, Miriam, and David perform heroic deeds in their youth.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $4.94   
  • Used (37) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.94
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(75)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Hardcover New 0689814917 Never Read-may have light shelf wear and a price sticker on the cover-publishers mark-I ship FAST!

Ships from: Waresboro, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$9.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(2)

Condition: New
Dom Lee New York, NY 1999 Hardcover First Edition. First Printing. New in New dust jacket. Book is new. Dust jacket in mylar cover. Free USPS Tracking. 133 pages.

Ships from: Edgewater, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Actor Kirk Douglas retells five Old Testament stories in which Abraham, Rebecca, Joseph, Miriam and David perform heroic deeds in their youth. Lively illustrations accompany each story. Perfect for family sharing.

Retells five Old Testament stories in which Abraham, Rebecca, Joseph, Miriam, and David perform heroic deeds in their youth.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
If ever a book seemed designed to appeal to grandparents, this is it, from the fancy jacket with its solemn inset illustration of David to the octogenarian celebrity author. Happily, kids should like it, too. Douglas proves himself a much better storyteller here than in his previous children's work, The Broken Mirror, perhaps because this time he is working from a script--accounts from the Bible and Midrash of the childhood deeds of Abraham, Rebecca, Joseph, Miriam and David. Douglas keeps the characters appealingly lifelike even as he drives home their extraordinary contributions and virtues. He treats the biblical setting to contemporary embellishments that make the stories more accessible. For example, when Abraham poses skeptical questions about idols, his teacher tells him, "Keep quiet, or you will have to stay after school." (Similarly, Abraham's father, the owner of the biggest idol shop in Ur, has a sign reading, "We have a god for every occasion"). The book does have flaws. Douglas sometimes plays a little too obviously to the audience ("The kids in the Bible were cool. They did great things and without any help from adults either"). There are also a few insipid moments (e.g., the author gives the origins of the name God as "the word `good' with an o left out"). But on balance the writing is sturdy, and the generalized Judeo-Christian delivery will keep the audience wide. Ages 8-up. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Five stories that cover a wide span of Old Testament history. The book begins with Abram, who "lived four thousand years ago," and continues through this family line with Rebecca, and then Joseph. The other two stories are about Miriam and David, who are said to be descendants of Judah-as are all people. Douglas identifies these tales as being his favorites because in them, "it's a little kid or a very young person who does something spectacular." In a casual, conversational manner, he introduces each selection by drawing parallels to his own life and includes his personal beliefs. The reteller tries hard to spark readers' interest, but he tries too hard. His version of the story of Joseph is called "A Spoiled Brat Who Grew Up to Be a Hero." Much unneccesary information is presented, which may distract readers who are trying to understand the Bible, not the actor's life or opinions. He strays off on tangents attempting to explain certain concepts, many of which do not need explanation, and interrupts the story line too frequently. Occasional pencil illustrations support the text. Eric Kimmel's Be Not Far from Me: The Oldest Love Story (S & S, 1998) is an unbiased retelling that will stimulate discussion.-Elizabeth Maggio, Palos Verdes Library District, Rolling Hills Estates, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689814914
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/1/1999
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 144
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Introduction

When I was a kid, I didn't like Sunday school. Didn't we have enough school during the week? Why did adults have to go and invent a special school to keep kids indoors on Sunday morning? I resented it.

The only good thing about it was that they didn't make us do homework, and when class was over, they gave us a cookie.

That's because Sunday school wasn't like real school. They only taught one subject -- the Bible. In my hometown, Amsterdam, in upstate New York, Sunday school was held in the basement of the synagogue (if you were Jewish) or in the basement of a church (if you were Christian). But later, when I talked to the other kids, I found out we were all learning a lot of the same stuff -- stories about Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, and other people that lived in biblical times, three or four thousand years ago. Boy, that is a long time ago!

The basement classroom, where I went to Sunday school every Sunday morning, seemed like a dungeon to me. I felt like a prisoner. The furnace was down there, so you'd think it would be warm, but it was always cold. Maybe the furnace wasn't working right. We sat on metal folding chairs in a semicircle. The chairs were cold too, so sometimes I sat on my hands.

The teacher, Mrs. Apple, sat in a big wooden chair with a red velvet cushion. But she stood up a lot and walked around while she was talking.

She was always lecturing us about how you had to be good and read the Bible. It was all very boring. We had a book with pictures full of people with big long beards. They were either very old, or they all hated to shave.

Now I am very old, and I hate to shave too. But I still feel like a kid. I don't know why this is. But there must be a good reason.

Actually, I have felt like a kid all my life. Maybe that's why I became an actor. When you are an actor in the movies, you get to play games; you pretend to be someone else -- a cowboy or a boxer or a detective. My best friend, Burt Lancaster, was an actor too, and people said we never grew up. I didn't care -- I had a lot of fun making more than eighty movies. Maybe you saw some of them.

I never made any movies about the Bible, but my friend Burt did -- he made a movie called Moses and he pretended to be Moses. My friend Charlton Heston made a movie called The Ten Commandments, and he pretended to be Moses too. I was jealous. Why couldn't I be Moses? I made a movie where I pretended to be Spartacus, who lived in biblical times, but he never made it into the Bible.

Back when I went to Sunday school, I only liked one thing -- stories about kids. The kids in the Bible were cool. They did great things and without any help from adults either.

When we got to those parts, I always wanted to know more and I would raise my hand and ask questions. When the teacher ignored me, I would ask anyhow. That's a good way to get into trouble. Many of my questions were never answered, and I didn't find the answers until I was old and started to read the Bible again.

When you get old, a funny thing happens. You forget the things that took place last week, but you remember with great clarity the things that happened many years ago, when you were a kid.

I'm remembering now all the things I learned in Sunday school, and I have to admit, there's a lot of good stuff in the Bible that isn't at all boring. In this book, I am going to retell some of my favorite stories. I promise to leave out anything that's really dull. You won't read about old men with long beards here! In all my favorite stories, it's a little kid or a very young person who does something spectacular. That's why I call this book: Young Heroes of the Bible.

Let's begin.

Text copyright © 1999 by Byrna Company
Illustrations copyright © 1999 by Dom Lee

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction

What to Do with a Very Sharp Ax
The Story of Abraham as a Kid

Even a Camel Gets Thirsty Sometimes
The Story of Rebecca as a Young Girl

A Spoiled Brat Who Grew Up to Be a Hero
The Story of Joseph as a Kid and a Young Man

Sister, Sister
The Story of Miriam and How She Risked Her Life for Her Baby Brother

The True Origins of Rubber Bands and Spitballs
The Story of David and His Bag of Pebbles

Conclusion

About Kirk Douglas

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)