The Young Investor: Projects and Activities for Making Your Money Grow

The Young Investor: Projects and Activities for Making Your Money Grow

4.5 2
by Katherine R. Bateman
     
 

A young person who saves $2,000 each year between the ages of 9 and 14, at an interest rate of 9 percent, will have one million dollars at age 65. And that is just by saving! This guide explains the language of business and the skill of investing, so that children can grow up business-literate and get an early start at making their money grow. The concepts of money

Overview

A young person who saves $2,000 each year between the ages of 9 and 14, at an interest rate of 9 percent, will have one million dollars at age 65. And that is just by saving! This guide explains the language of business and the skill of investing, so that children can grow up business-literate and get an early start at making their money grow. The concepts of money and simple and compound interest show how saving works; then children learn where Wall Street is, what stocks and bonds do, and, with the help of an adult, the right way to buy or sell a stock, mutual fund, or savings bond. Dozens of activities teach how to balance a checkbook, read stock tables, and know what people are talking about when they mention inflation, recession, and the Federal Reserve Board.

Editorial Reviews

Copley News Service
Offers valuable projects and activities for kids 9 and up to help their money grow.
Teachers Friend Publication
Explains everything young people need to know to be money-savvy
Tim Schwertfeger
Using this friendly companion, young adults can make their way across the 'great divide' that separates the savers and investors from the spenders.
Kliatt
Easy-to-follow and informative.
Publishers Weekly
A grandmother realizes her goal to give her grandchildren money and teach them the "language of business" in The Young Investor: Projects and Activities for Making Your Money Grow by Katherine Bateman. Here, Bateman, a former vice president of a major investment firm, translates five years' worth of research about saving, investing, the economy and the stock market and translates it into language that "tweens" and financially challenged adults can understand. A glossary, bibliography, Web sites and phone numbers are also included. ( Nov.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
KLIATT
This is an easy-to-follow and informative look at how teens can earn, use, and attempt to increase their money. The book's strength is its short, clear, and simply stated subject divisions of what could be considered a rather daunting subject. Each chapter concludes with a helpful review of the points considered. Financial terms are explained using familiar comparisons—the Index of Leading Economic Indicators as a monthly report card, the nation's money supply to a really big allowance, consumer confidence as driving a cyclical economic wheel, and stock sectors as music CD categories like "Rock 'n Roll" or "R & B." Even the seemingly complex process of how the stock market works is made easily understood by comparisons with the way popular sport leagues work. Bateman brings a calming ease and clarity to a difficult subject, making this an excellent title to add to a library shelf. She does not entertain with cartoons, gags or funny quizzes. Instead there are activities and projects to explore, employ, and further extend what has just been learned, which are beneficial for classroom use. Sources for further information, Web sites, and addresses are included as well as an index, glossary, and author's biography that establishes Bateman's credentials to teach this subject. Recommended for middle school and high school levels, for both classroom application and library acquisition. Category: Education & Guidance. KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2001, Chicago Review Press, dist. by Independent Publishers, 124p. illus. tables. index.,
— Linda Piwowarczyk; Bolingbrook, IL
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-Starting with homey stories and personal examples, Bateman demonstrates how to learn about investments from everyday experiences. Using current examples such as CD boom boxes but without fancy graphics, she explains the "money circle," an excellent way to characterize the circulation of wealth; mentions bank accounts; and then provides a concise summary of savings vehicles, including an account of the "magic" of compound interest, illustrated by a table and a story of a successful young investor. As Bateman covers broader and deeper topics such as risk-tolerance, stock reports, and macroeconomics, she follows the same pattern in each chapter. Constantly referring to points made earlier, the author provides plenty of opportunity for review and concludes each chapter with another account of the young investor's story-he ends up with his own land and hopes for a house on it. She advises readers to stick with investments they can easily evaluate themselves. Most of the Web sites recommended are authoritative and helpful, just like the text. However, the shelves are getting pretty crowded. Janet Bamford's Street Wise: A Guide for Teen Investors (Bloomberg, 2000), Jay Liebowitz's Wall Street Wizard: Sound Ideas from a Savvy Teen Investor (S & S, 2000), Gail Karlitz and Debbie Honig's Growing Money (Price Stern Sloan, 1999; o.p.), and Neale S. Godfrey's Ultimate Kids' Money Book (S & S, 1998) all cover much of the same ground. Less sophisticated in its writing, this one may appeal more to those who appreciate plain-spoken language.-Jonathan Betz-Zall, City University Library, Everett, WA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556523960
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/28/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
9 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Katherine R. Bateman was vice president and senior research analyst at John Nuveen & Co., a major investment firm in Chicago. She lives in Chicago.

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Young Investor 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read it five times it was so good! So much information to get you making money on wall street.