Young & Old

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Tim Sendra
After their first album and the story behind it, Tennis weren't going to have an easy time with the follow-up. How do you compete with a record that came out of nowhere and knocked people out with its lovely, lo-fi-sounding '50s pop and the romantic back-story of how all the songs were written on a months-long boat excursion at sea? The easy answer is that you don't. The duo of Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley decided to keep the core sound intact on Young & Old but expand it a bit, adding drummer James Barone to the band full-time and hitting the studio with Black Key Patrick Carney behind the board. The result is a record that sounds a whole bunch like Cape Dory but with...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Tim Sendra
After their first album and the story behind it, Tennis weren't going to have an easy time with the follow-up. How do you compete with a record that came out of nowhere and knocked people out with its lovely, lo-fi-sounding '50s pop and the romantic back-story of how all the songs were written on a months-long boat excursion at sea? The easy answer is that you don't. The duo of Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley decided to keep the core sound intact on Young & Old but expand it a bit, adding drummer James Barone to the band full-time and hitting the studio with Black Key Patrick Carney behind the board. The result is a record that sounds a whole bunch like Cape Dory but with a crisper, less bedroom sound that strips away most the gauzy reverb and lets the instruments breathe a little more, especially the piano and drums. It's enough of a shift in perspective and approach to stave of any accusations of sticking too closely to their formula, but it's not enough of one to scare off anyone but the hardest of the hardcore reverb fanatics. Now you can really absorb how good and unique Moore's vocals are; she sounds less affected this time out and invests the songs with more insistent emotional content. The whole album takes that tack as well, feeling much more immediate and powerful. Some may miss the mystery of Cape Dory, but there's enough intrigue and drama left to make Young & Old exciting, even a little thrilling at times. Much of the album has a punch and power that Cape never had and the ratio of hits to misses is impressively high, hovering right around 100 percent hits. Almost every song would be a mixtape highlight and surprisingly, given how atmospheric Cape Dory was, songs like "High Road," with its Northern soul bounce and handclaps, and "Traveling" wouldn't be out of place at an indie disco. Even the rare ballads, like the lilting "My Better Self" and "Origins," have more rhythmic intensity this time. Young & Old won't make you forget Cape Dory, but it's an impressive flip side to Tennis and shows they aren't a one-trick pony. If next time out they figure out how to blend the dreamy romance of the first record and the uptempo pop charm of this one, you might be looking at something pretty amazing. As it is, though, Tennis are making some of the best pop music around in 2012, and that's plenty good enough.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/14/2012
  • Label: Fat Possum Records
  • UPC: 767981126524
  • Catalog Number: 1265
  • Sales rank: 70,853

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 It All Feels the Same (3:23)
  2. 2 Origins (3:28)
  3. 3 My Better Self (3:44)
  4. 4 Traveling (3:01)
  5. 5 Petition (3:11)
  6. 6 Robin (3:04)
  7. 7 High Road (3:03)
  8. 8 Dreaming (3:14)
  9. 9 Take Me To Heaven (3:25)
  10. 10 Never To Part (3:26)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Tennis Primary Artist
James Barone Percussion, Drums
Alaina Moore Piano, Keyboards, Vocals
Patrick Riley Bass, Guitar
Technical Credits
Roger Moutenot Producer, Engineer
Patrick Carney Producer
Brian Lucey Mastering
Tennis Producer
Alaina Moore Composer
Patrick Riley Composer
Michael Carney Art Direction
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 19, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Patrick Carney + Tennis = Fragile Pop

    The Black Keys are certainly busy behind the boards these days. Dan Auerbarch just produced a sensational album for legendary New Orleans pianist Dr. John. Meanwhile, Patrick Carney has produced "Young & Old", the second album by Tennis, who are about as different from The Black Keys or Dr. John as you can get. Tennis' first album, "Cape Dory", was like an early 1960's lo-fi, surf-rock throwback. This album is more like 1970's breezy pop with a touch of Shins-style indie rock.

    The husband-and-wife team of vocalist-keyboardist Aliana Moore and guitarist Patrick Riley has concocted some very catchy songs that you may find yourself singing after the first listening, such as "It All Feels The Same" and "My Better Self" (a dead-ringer for The Sundays). The group has also added a drummer, James Barone, whose style is very much akin to the gutbucket sound of Patrick Carney. Even when the band gets a little weepy on "Take Me To Heaven" and "Never To Part", they sound happy and optimistic, even though none of the songs on the album runs over four minutes.

    Listening to "Young & Old", it's easy to see why some thought The Black Keys were moving away from their gutsy, bluesy sound and towards a more pop feeling with their last album, "El Camino". However, when Moore's fragile voice takes on the bigotted stubborness of the times with the gorgeous Carole King-ish "Petition", it makes you wish Tennis were as popular as Dr. John. Or The Black Keys. Or Carole King.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews