Your Life as a Settler in Colonial America

Your Life as a Settler in Colonial America

by Thomas Kingsley Troupe, C.B. Canga
     
 

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You just tried out for the school play. Who wants the lead part more than anyone? YOU! Imagine riding in horse-drawn carriages. Dining with the finest silverware. Wearing fancy clothes and powdered wigs. But be careful what you wish for. That might not be the way it was for a settler in Colonial America ...

Overview

You just tried out for the school play. Who wants the lead part more than anyone? YOU! Imagine riding in horse-drawn carriages. Dining with the finest silverware. Wearing fancy clothes and powdered wigs. But be careful what you wish for. That might not be the way it was for a settler in Colonial America ...

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leigh Geiger
Young readers might imagine that they've been asked to play the role of an 11-year old boy in Williamsburg, VA in 1762, and that this is the script they should follow. This text brings this role to life through very simple actions which could easily be re-played by young readers with very little adult supervision. With some embellishment, it might also be the basis for a more formal classroom drama. Troupe presents a clear "day in the life" snapshot, told only from the boy's point of view. We learn briefly about life in a "dome school" where boys and girls studied in a teacher's home. This is contrasted with an "elementary school" exclusively for older boys where stern physical punishment awaits any student who fails to thoroughly understand his lessons. Readers are also offered a brief glimpse into children's games, meals and clothing—again, only from the young male perspective. We learn that the boy is looking forward to working in his father's blacksmith shop. A few other possible lifestyles are very briefly depicted, but again, only from the boy's perspective. Girls will find very little opportunity to identify with Colonial times from this text. There is also a brief mention of slavery. Troupe uses an "actor" from the current day as a device throughout the narrative to comment on the difference between colonial life and modern times. The actor remarks, e.g., on the fact that travel in Colonial America wasn't as easy as it is today, but that colonists didn't need to travel very far since they grew their own food and made their own clothes and tools. There is no discussion of the role of women, historical events or culture, other than a brief reference to the Bible as a textbook. Reviewer: Leigh Geiger, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781404872516
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Series:
The Way It Was
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
499,345
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
650L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

Thomas Kingsley Troupe has written more than thirty children's books. His book Legend of the Werewolf (Picture Window Books, 2011) received a bronze medal for the Moonbeam Children's Book Award. Thomas lives in Woodbury, Minnesota with his wife and two young boys.

C.B. Canga was born at a naval base in Jacksonville, Florida in 1976. Early on, he discovered that a piece of paper and some crayons opened up a magical door to distant lands and daring adventures. His childhood imagination and art was fueled by early Japanese Animation, Science-Fiction movies, and classical fairy tales. This was evident in the countless robots, spaceships, monsters, and clothed animals he drew.He resides in California, with his wife Robyn, and kids, Rockwell and Trinity. He has worked for clients, such as: Scholastic, Harper Collins, Outdoor Life Magazine, Highlights Magazine, National Geographic and much more.

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