×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw
  • Alternative view 1 of Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw
  • Alternative view 2 of Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw
  • Alternative view 3 of Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw
  • Alternative view 4 of Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw
<Previous >Next
     

Your Life in Comics: 100 Things for Guys to Write and Draw

by Bill Zimmerman, Tyler Page (Illustrator)
 

What’s more fun for guys than reading comics? Making their own. Your Life in Comics lets boys ages 9–13 do just that. Inspired by the Free Spirit favorite 100 Things Guys Need to Know, this do-it-yourself comic book features cartooning exercises and prompts that get boys thinking about important subjects in their lives, including family,

Overview

What’s more fun for guys than reading comics? Making their own. Your Life in Comics lets boys ages 9–13 do just that. Inspired by the Free Spirit favorite 100 Things Guys Need to Know, this do-it-yourself comic book features cartooning exercises and prompts that get boys thinking about important subjects in their lives, including family, friends, school, health, and the future. Rather than provide the story, the book allows guys to decide what happens by creating words and drawings of their own. Some of the interactive exercises feature completed comic strip panels where boys imagine and write the dialog. Others let guys draw comic strips of their own. Freestyle activities let kids personalize the book and explore who they are. Web extensions point the way to additional fun, interactive resources online.

Comic books and graphic novels help educators and parents get reluctant readers interested in books. Your Life in Comics goes a step further and helps get guys thinking and writing about critical topics in their lives.
 

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Leona Illig
Parents and teachers know that the early teen years are full of challenges, especially for boys. Getting boys to understand their own feelings, much less the feelings of others, can be challenging. This workbook aims to explore the emotions, uncertainty, and confusion of those years by encouraging readers to record incidents from their own lives in a comic-book format. The author provides instruction on how to write your own comic strip, complete with prompts and tips about how to construct a plot. No artistic talent is needed. The author emphasizes that everyone has a different style of drawing and writing, and one's own style is just as good as anyone else's. What is needed to make this workbook succeed, however, is initiative on the part of the reader. The initiative can be based on a love of comic strips, an interest in graphic novels, or artistic talent. The prime motivation, however, must be that the boy is willing to express his feelings. The prompts in the book ask the reader questions, such as his happiest memory and the three most important things in his life. Other exercises ask the reader to look at illustrations and decide what the characters are talking about. Needless to say, if a boy is interested in doing the exercises, the results could be a treasure trove of information about his life and psychological well-being. It is hard to say, however, if a boy would want to share his ideas and emotions with others, or if he would want to keep the workbook as a private journal. In any case, this book could be of great emotional and intellectual benefit to boys and the adults around them. The author includes a number of activity downloads and websites that complement this workbook. Reviewer: Leona Illig

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781575423517
Publisher:
Free Spirit Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/2010
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

Videos

Meet the Author

A former journalist and prize-winning newspaper editor, Bill Zimmerman has spent his career focused on empowering young people and helping families bond. As a senior editor for Newsday, he created a regular interactive feature to teach young people about current events that was twice nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. Bill is the creator of MakeBeliefsComix.com, an interactive Web site where users can create comic strips. Bill lives in New York City.

 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews