Your Name in Print: A Teen's Guide to Publishing for Fun, Profit and Academic Success

Your Name in Print: A Teen's Guide to Publishing for Fun, Profit and Academic Success

by Timothy Harper
     
 

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Make Your Mark

Looking for a way to express yourself? Need some extra spending money? Do you want to beef up that college application package? Look no further than this book.

With advice on how to write newspaper and magazine features, Web blogs, music and movie reviews, novels, graphic novels, short stories, and more, the father-daughter team of

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Overview

Make Your Mark

Looking for a way to express yourself? Need some extra spending money? Do you want to beef up that college application package? Look no further than this book.

With advice on how to write newspaper and magazine features, Web blogs, music and movie reviews, novels, graphic novels, short stories, and more, the father-daughter team of Timothy and Elizabeth Harper shows that it's possible for anyone who writes well to get published.

Topics include:

· How to find subjects to write about

· Learning productive research and writing habits

· Identifying the best market for your work

· Managing your career

· And so much more

With practical information on every step of the writing process, writing samples, personal anecdotes, tips from the pros, profiles on young authors such as Christopher Paolini and Zoe Trope, and a resource section, Your Name in Print has all the tools and advice young writers need to break into the writing world.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Young writers can "grab a multitude of ideas" from this well designed title that targets strategies for authorship and publication. Specific details related to the entire writing and publishing process—motivation, balance, inspiration, and marketing, are shared by the team of journalist father (Timothy) and high school daughter (Elizabeth). Each chapter is designed to provide practical advice blended with insights from a potpourri of writing role models (experts, authors, editors, publishers, parents, and teachers) plus tidbits from Tim and Lizzie. The authors do not shy away from the daunting tasks of writing, repeating the values of discipline and the necessity to grab opportunities. They infer that the process is a balancing act and offer expert guidance that stimulates ideas in order to establish vehicles that steer toward publication. Promising scripters are reminded to prepare for rejection and limited earnings. Sources for youth market media submissions include school and community newspapers, cyberspace stories, zines, and blogs. An extensive list of web links for students and supporting adults will contribute to those pursuing advice and submissions. Recommended sites include The Scriptorium, Young People's Press, TeenInk, and TeanLit. A few links did not connect, but inserting the site name into a search engine helped get results. This title includes a table of contents, introduction, an index, and info about the authors. Writing teenagers who aspire to be published will be encouraged, motivated, and directed in this guide filled with creditable tips. 2005, St Martin's Griffin, Ages 12 to 18.
—Barbara Troisi
VOYA
Getting one's name in print is good for college applications, resumes, and egos, according to this father-daughter writing team. To help teen writers achieve that goal, the Harpers offer chapters and features on a variety of subjects: writing outlets (such as local papers and blogs); article topics; workspaces; book publishing and agents; tips from pros; sample columns; "glances" at current teen writers. Because the book's focus is getting published rather than learning to write, its writing tips are mostly generalized-"get to the point." The book concludes with an extensive annotated webliography of sites accepting teen submissions or offering writing help (with six broken links). The index was missing from the review copy. This lively book is packed with useful information for the budding journalist and application/rTsumT padder, who seem more its target audience than the naturally passionate fiction writer (despite the overview of book publishing). In addition to being well written, the book is exceptionally well designed, with short sections and varied presentations maintaining reader interest. Two reservations, however, preclude a 5Q. First, when the authors remind readers that writing for its own sake can offer true satisfaction, it clashes with the book's premise and muddles the message, possibly providing a hedge against future complaints. Second, using eighteen-year-old Lizzie Harper's experiences as examples might misrepresent the common experience because few readers will have a writer-father to offer support, mentoring, and connections. These reservations aside, however, this book will be a useful addition for most libraries. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marredonly by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2005, St. Martin's, 178p.; Appendix., Trade pb. Ages 11 to 18.
—Rebecca C. Moore
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-"The beautiful part of writing is that you don't have to get it right the first time, unlike, say a brain surgeon," wrote Robert Cormier. Such advice is typical of the practical down-to-earth material offered up in this user-friendly resource. Geared toward highly motivated students, it offers tips from getting published to accumulating published pieces that increase potential for college admission. For young writers considering journalism as a vocation, this encouraging source just may win them over. The authors' alternating voices strike a chord of friendly suggestions and professional plausibility. Dad and daughter are motivated, successful, and confident in their chosen fields. Their recommendations will entertain, re-focus, and rejuvenate worn and weary high school wordsmiths. The book concludes with a compilation of online sites that accept teen work. Some eager young writers will zip to the end to choose their publishing adventure, making this a book most likely to be read from back to front.-Alison Follos, North Country School, Lake Placid, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466829619
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
06/01/2005
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
File size:
277 KB

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Harper was an honors student and an editor of the award-winning school newspaper at Ridgewood High School in New Jersey. A former weekly columnist for the Ridgewood News, she has also had her work appear in The New York Times and The Record in Bergen County, New Jersey. She attends Oberlin College in Ohio.

Timothy Harper is a journalist, an editorial/publishing consultant, and the author of eleven previous books and hundreds of articles. An adjunct faculty member at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, he lives in Ridgewood, New Jersey.


Timothy Harper is a journalist, an editorial/publishing consultant, and the author of books including Your Name in Print and hundreds of articles. An adjunct faculty member at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, he lives in Ridgewood, New Jersey.


Elizabeth Harper was an honors student and an editor of the award-winning school newspaper at Ridgewood High School in New Jersey. A former weekly columnist for the Ridgewood News, she has also had her work appear in The New York Times and The Record in Bergen County, New Jersey. She attends Oberlin College in Ohio.

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