Your Vibrant Heart: Restoring Health, Strength, and Spirit from the Body's Core

Your Vibrant Heart: Restoring Health, Strength, and Spirit from the Body's Core

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by Cynthia Thaik
     
 

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In Your Vibrant Heart, you will discover:
·    How to recognize warning symptoms and your risk of heart disease
·    Strategies to improve your health, nutritional status and detoxify your body
·    Tips to gain physical strength and improve cardiovascular…  See more details below

Overview


In Your Vibrant Heart, you will discover:
·    How to recognize warning symptoms and your risk of heart disease
·    Strategies to improve your health, nutritional status and detoxify your body
·    Tips to gain physical strength and improve cardiovascular endurance
·    Steps to achieve mental clarity and spiritual enlightenment
·    Keys to allow abundance, health, wealth, and wisdom into your life
·    How to harness positive affirmations
·    How to achieve heightened energy and increased creativity

Life is a gift, and good health and a good heart should be our most prized possessions.  Yet many people fail to treasure their health and their hearts until those blessings are gone. In Your Vibrant Heart, acclaimed cardiologist Dr. Cynthia Thaik explores the dynamic growth and healing processes of our ever-evolving hearts. Forging the missing links between Eastern and Western medicine, Dr. Cynthia covers the wisdom of conventional practices and beyond, unearthing a mind-body connection that takes us to the edge of what we thought we knew and placing the power of healing back in the hands of patients.

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Editorial Reviews

nding the Mind

"In Your Vibrant Heart, Cynthia Thaik, M.D., shows how to integrate meditation, mindfulness, yoga, and self-awareness in a powerful program that brings forth inner peace, well-being, and health. Bravo, Dr. Cynthia!"
    —Joan Borysenko, Ph.D., author of New York Times bestseller Minding the Body, Mending the Mind
and Inspired & Unstoppable: Wildly Succeeding ve

“Dr. Cynthia is a visionary who will advance your health in every way. I’m excited to recommend her book to help you care for your precious heart--so that you can listen to it and offer all your gifts to our world.”  
    —Tama Kieves, best-selling author of This Time I Dance! Creating the Work You Love, and Inspired & Unstoppable: Wildly Succeeding in Your Life’s Work!

Food Revolution

“If you want a healthy and happy heart, you’re going to LOVE Your Vibrant Heart! This book will guide you on the path to a more love-filled life!”
    —Ocean Robbins, CEO, The Food Revolution Network, and co-author of Voices of the Food Revolution
he Heart

“Dr. Cynthia has found a simple and compelling way to pull together her professional knowledge, personal narrative, and wisdom from multiple disciplines to keep your heart healthy and vibrant.”    
    —ILCHI LEE, author of New York Times bestseller The Call of Sedone: Journey of the Heart
-Joan Borysenko

"In Your Vibrant Heart, Cynthia Thaik, M.D., shows how to integrate meditation, mindfulness, yoga, and self-awareness in a powerful program that brings forth inner peace, well-being, and health. Bravo, Dr. Cynthia!"
    —Joan Borysenko, Ph.D., author of New York Times bestseller Minding the Body, Mending the Mind
-Michael Bernard Beckwith

"Dr. Cynthia Thaik’s medical and personal wisdom will enable all readers to achieve their maximum potential for health, longevity, and inner happiness. Read it and thrive!"
    —Michael Bernard Beckwith, author of Life Visioning
-Tama Kieves

“Dr. Cynthia is a visionary who will advance your health in every way. I’m excited to recommend her book to help you care for your precious heart--so that you can listen to it and offer all your gifts to our world.”  
    —Tama Kieves, best-selling author of This Time I Dance! Creating the Work You Love, and Inspired & Unstoppable: Wildly Succeeding in Your Life’s Work!

-Ocean Robbins

“If you want a healthy and happy heart, you’re going to LOVE Your Vibrant Heart! This book will guide you on the path to a more love-filled life!”
    —Ocean Robbins, CEO, The Food Revolution Network, and co-author of Voices of the Food Revolution
-ILCHI LEE

“Dr. Cynthia has found a simple and compelling way to pull together her professional knowledge, personal narrative, and wisdom from multiple disciplines to keep your heart healthy and vibrant.”    
    —ILCHI LEE, author of New York Times bestseller The Call of Sedone: Journey of the Heart

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780989104128
Publisher:
Revitalize Press
Publication date:
02/04/2014
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
609,616
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

Dr. Cynthia's Your Vibrant HEART

Restoring Health, Strength & Spirit from the Body's Core


By Cynthia Thaik

Revitalize Press

Copyright © 2014 Cynthia Thaik, M.D.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-9891041-2-8



CHAPTER 1

The Heart Is a Many-Splendored Thing

"What is straight? A line can be straight, or a street, but the human heart, oh, no; it's curved like a road through mountains." —Tennessee Williams


What Is a Heart?

When the Four Aces sang "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," they were inadvertently referring to a complex set of emotions triggered by the heart. The lyrics would not have been quite as catchy if "love" was replaced with "heart." Yet in reality, it is the heart itself that is a thing of splendor—an incredibly complex, unmatched work of art with multiple facets, each as magnificent as the other.

I am not referring just to the marvel of the physical heart, but also to the metaphysical heart—the heart that not only keeps us alive, but represents the different aspects of self: emotions, mind, body, soul, and spirit.

The heart has long been recognized as a symbol of love, but it is also referred to as the spiritual, emotional, moral, and even intellectual core of the human body. The heart was once believed to be the seat of the human soul. In various religions, the heart symbol also has numerous meanings, including charity, hope, energy, flow, happiness, and joy.

In this chapter, we will explore the facets of your physical and spiritual heart. We'll begin at what most people perceive to be the beginning: the physical heart and where it comes from.


Stages of Heart Development

While we might debate for ages about whether life starts at the point of conception, there is no arguing that life is present in the first heartbeat, which occurs approximately twenty-one days after conception.

As seen in Figure 1-1, heart development has five stages. It begins when cardiac precursor cells migrate to form a primitive heart tube. Even at the very early stage as a tube, the heart has different regions and layers. The primitive heart tube closely resembles a fish heart, and it is within this tube that the first flickering of a heartbeat is detected.

In the second stage of heart development, called heart looping, the tube-shaped heart contours into an S shape, bending to the right in a d-looping. It is within this contour that the chambers of the heart will develop.

The third stage, called the two-chambered stage, allows for the development of the two-chambered (one atrium, one ventricle) heart, which resembles the heart of a frog.

The fourth stage of development is the three-chambered heart, triggered by the atrium dividing into two atria. At this stage, the embryo heart resembles that of a snake or a turtle heart.

The final stage of heart development occurs by the end of the tenth week of pregnancy, with the development of the four-chambered heart consisting of two atria, two ventricles, and two great blood vessels—distinguished as a human heart and capable of running a fully functional cardiovascular system.

Given the complexities and intricacies of heart development, it is amazing that in most live births the heart is perfectly formed and functional.

Similarly, it is of no surprise that heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting nearly 1 percent of births a year (approximately forty thousand births). Heart defect is the leading cause of birth-defect-related illness or death. It is estimated that 15 percent of heart defects are associated with a genetic condition. Approximately 20 to 30 percent of those with heart defects have other physical, develop mental, or cognitive problems.

Today, the prevalence of minor cardiac defects is increasing, while the prevalence of more serious defects is stable. The survival rates of the more serious cardiac defects have significantly improved with better diagnostic tools and surgical treatment.

Based on available studies, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), based in Atlanta, estimates that more than one million adults in the United States live with a heart defect. Most of these people survive into adulthood, and while there might be some limitation to exercise capacity, most live normal or near-normal lives.


How Your Physical Heart Works

The primary function of a heart is to deliver oxygen-rich blood to the cells and organs of the body. Each person's magnificent heart functions tirelessly, beating approximately 80,000 to 140,000 times a day, depending on the resting heart rate. This accounts for forty-two million heartbeats a year. An average resting cardiac output would be 5.6 liters per minute for a human male and 4.9 liters per minute for a female, but the heart is capable of delivering three to four times that amount during exercise, and a world-class athlete can deliver up to 40 liters per minute.

The blood circulates in a closed-circuit system, returning to the heart from the rest of the body through the venous system of blood vessels. The blood travels through the right atrium through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. From there, it travels through the pulmonary valve into the pulmonary vessels, traversing the lung alveoli, picking up oxygen for the blood cells. From the lung, the blood travels back through the left atrium through the mitral valve into the left ventricle.

The left ventricle is considered the main workhorse of the heart. It is the chamber responsible for propelling the blood through the aortic valve to the rest of the body through arterial blood vessel circulation. Figure 1-2 demonstrates the path of blood flow through the heart.


The Amazing Work of Cardiac Cells

There is no reliable scientific knowledge of the number of cells comprising the human heart, although one abstract hypothesis estimates, using DNA content measurement, that there are hundreds of millions to billions of cardiac cells.

It was once thought that neither the human heart cells nor the brain cells were capable of regenerating, but we now know otherwise. Scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden report that into early adulthood, we're continually renewing about 1 percent of our heart cells a year. That regeneration slows down, but it still occurs in old age, with a little less than half of 1 percent of cells regenerating at age seventy-five. All told, we've renewed about 40 percent of our heart cells by age seventy, neuroscientist Jonas Frisén told Science magazine, providing hope that even a damaged heart stands a chance of being repaired to health.

Regardless of the number of cardiac cells, the cells of the heart work together as a functional syncytium—with all the cardiac muscle cells interconnected to one another mechanically, chemically, and electrically, and acting as a single enormous muscle.


Physical Heart, Emotional Heart

The connection between the physical heart and the emotional heart can be expressed in any number of ways. For me, one of the most stirring expressions of it comes through the miracle of motherhood. In comparison to what I experienced twenty-five years ago in my training, the advances of modern technology now allow physicians to diagnose many complex congenital heart diseases and even intervene in utero.


A Mother's Faith

Kari, a pharmaceutical representative who visits me often, was at age thirty-seven excitedly anticipating the birth of her second child. All blood tests required by the state showed her chances of having a baby with any birth defect to be low.

Then, out of the blue, the unthinkable showed up at her seventh-month ultrasound. Her baby was found to have transposition of the great arteries: there was no crossing of the baby's blood from the right to the left side of the organ.

Kari's heart sank as she was told that her baby did not have a chance of surviving and that she should consider an abortion. The next week brought a frantic pace of repeat ultrasounds, as well as consultations with four pediatric cardiologists and one of the top cardiothoracic surgeons in the area.

The decision to keep her child was based in faith. Her son's open-heart surgery on his third day of life lasted three-and-a-half hours. Today he is a beautiful three-year-old boy in great shape, and other than the scar on his chest, you would not know that he was born with a life-threatening heart defect.


Unfortunately, not all of these stories have happy endings. After feeling the exhilaration and utter joy of having given birth to a perfectly formed and healthy baby boy, Jonathan, I experienced two miscarriages in quick succession. My second conception resulted in a pregnancy that did not reveal a heartbeat in the expected third or fourth week. Yet even the sadness and disappointment of that loss pales in comparison to the experience of our third child, who survived several weeks longer.

Any mother who has undergone such a loss understands the fear and anticipation of the first ultrasound scanning for any detection of the heartbeat that signifies life. To have felt the comfort and relief of seeing a heart beating at the appropriate heart rate at the third week, only to have a repeat ultrasound two weeks later reveal a still heart, created a pain beyond belief.

Even though both children died early in their development, the emotions I experienced after their losses were devastating. The magnitude of the second loss was intensified by the mere presence of a heartbeat for a few short weeks.

I can only imagine, then, the pain when the loss occurs just minutes or hours or days after a full birth. I witnessed the intense sorrow of a young mother who held her newborn boy for just a few short hours after he was born with a multitude of congenital defects (including cardiac), which were well beyond any remedy that modern medicine could offer at that time.

As the young mother gently caressed that child, kissing, hugging, and holding him in her arms, I—a young medical student not yet having undergone my own tragedies—wondered which would be a worse fate: to have a few short hours of being able to hold that breathing, living, warm being and to feel and hear that heartbeat before losing the child, or to lose the child within the womb and never have the child be born alive at all.

Anyone who has experienced motherhood knows the myriad emotions that one experiences upon learning that within your body lives the heartbeat of another. The nine months of incubation allow for a full appreciation of the awesomeness of creation. This being, who started from the division of a single cell, develops complex nerve connections, digestive organs, and functioning cardiac, circulatory, and other systems—all within nine short months.

One can truly appreciate the marvels of creation when one considers that only a very small percentage of live births result in a baby not being anatomically perfect with ten fingers, ten toes, and a beautifully formed face with all of its components. Those of us who have had the misfortune of experiencing otherwise also have a great appreciation for the delicacies of this process. Fortunately for me, the universe rewards patience and persistence. My faith in the miracle of life was restored following the births of my beautiful daughter, Sarah, and my energetic boy, Andrew.


The Emotional Heart

The intricacies and the complexities of the physical heart are paralleled by the intricacies and complexities of the emotional heart. Many would argue, and appropriately so, that navigating through life with the emotional heart is like maneuvering through a labyrinth marked by temperamental swings from deep despair to heights of exhilaration.

Unlike the physical heart that needs to deal only with physical stress, the emotional heart must deal not only with physical stress, but also with emotional, mental, and psychological stress. Whereas the physical heart only has to adapt to the makeup of the individual, the emotional heart deals with the rewards and burdens of self and is greatly influenced by interactions with loved ones, society at large, and the environment.

All too often, we tend to run away from our emotions, as if acknowledging their existence is a sign of weakness. But if we don't embrace and allow our emotions to express themselves, then their vibratory energy becomes internalized and becomes expressed in the form of symptoms, or dis "ease." Denying their existence does nothing to ease the pain, but rather prevents us from enjoying life as it is truly meant to be experienced.

Emotion is energy in motion, and it represents the energy that lows from and through our heart to the rest of our body. By embracing the emotions that low from our heart, we harness the love, kindness, compassion, warmth, harmony, joy, peace, appreciation, gratitude, and resilience that reside in all of us.


An Emotional Heart Attack

The heart is a symbol of love, and love is an emotion. All emotions vibrate at different frequencies. Anger, hatred, and resentment have low vibratory energies. Happiness, joy, and kindness have high ones. The emotions of love and gratitude vibrate at the highest frequency. Love heals the heart and inspires peace, harmony, and calmness. In order to maintain a balanced and healthy physical heart, we must take care to feed the emotional heart.

An emotionally broken heart has been shown to lead to a physically broken heart. Dr. Stephen T. Sinatra—a board-certified cardiologist and certified psychotherapist with forty years of clinical experience in treating, preventing, and reversing heart disease—in his book Heartbreak and Heart Disease speaks about this all-important mind-body connection to heart disease. It is estimated that 1 to 2 percent of patients diagnosed with a heart attack in the United States suffers from an emotionally broken heart. The presentation is very similar (chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations), but the pathophysiology is markedly different.

A physical heart attack is usually caused by a blockage of the coronary artery by either atherosclerosis (the hardening of the blood vessel with cholesterol and other depositions) or thrombosis (blood clotting).

An emotional heart attack is caused by a surge of adrenaline and other neurohormones, which overwhelms and weakens the heart muscle, leading to a ballooning of the apex and causing the heart to take the shape of a Japanese teapot—thus its name, takotsubo cardiomyopathy ("tako-tsubo" means "fishing pot for trapping octopus"). It is also referred to as broken-heart syndrome.

While there are a few different artery anomalies among the proposed origins for broken-heart syndrome, case studies looking at the larger picture suggest that emotional triggers or clinical stressors (such as an asthma attack or a sudden illness) are often present. The prevalence is higher in the winter months, and the vast majority of the patients are female, typically postmenopausal.

I saw a case of broken-heart syndrome in my career. It was during a terrible snowstorm, when a mother and her teenage son were brought into the emergency room after a catastrophic automobile accident. The mother had been driving and had suffered only minor cuts and injuries, while her son was severely injured. She was in near hysterics as she watched the emergency-room personnel work frantically to save her son's life.

Suddenly, she clutched her chest and slumped over. She was having a heart attack, but subsequent tests did not reveal any significant blockage of her arteries. The conclusion was that the extreme emotional stress of the automobile accident and the fear of her child's potential demise triggered the attack. Fortunately, both mother and son survived.

Although the above example is an extreme case, it is vital that we take care of our emotional health, as negative emotions have a tremendous impact on our heart and our overall health. Negative emotions often lead to despair and depression, which have been shown to wreak biological havoc within our bodies. Depression leads to the increased secretion of cortisol, a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands that is associated with heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Surges of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, can also lead to agitation, restlessness, anxiety, high blood pressure, and rapid heart rate. Depression also leads to increased inflammatory markers, such as C-Reactive Proteins (CRP), which have been shown to predict future heart-attack risk. Depression is furthermore linked to diminution of the immune system.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Dr. Cynthia's Your Vibrant HEART by Cynthia Thaik. Copyright © 2014 Cynthia Thaik, M.D.. Excerpted by permission of Revitalize Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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What People are saying about this

author of New York Times bestseller The Call of Sedone: Journey of the Heart - Ilchi Lee
“Dr. Cynthia has found a simple and compelling way to pull together her professional knowledge, personal narrative, and wisdom from multiple disciplines to keep your heart healthy and vibrant.”
M.D., author of Prime-Time Health - William Sears
"Wonderful read. Dr. Cynthia gives you the motivational tools to create a happier brain and a healthier heart."
bestselling author of The Psychology of Achievement - Brian Tracy
"This revolutionary book on heart health is the most complete study ever done to show you how to live longer, better, happier and more vibrantly than you ever thought possible."
M.D. best-selling author of Love, Medicine & Miracles - Bernie Siegel
"The book explores the potency of self-directed healing, when we allow the positive energies of our mind and our heart to guide our lives."
Ph.D., author of Conscious Loving and The Big Leap - Gay Hendricks
"What I like most about the book is that it shows us the real inside-job of health, how to draw on the power of love to reinvent ourselves from the inside out."
best-selling author of This Time I Dance! Creating the Work You Love, and Inspired & Unstoppable: Wildly Succeeding in Y - Tama Kieves
“Dr. Cynthia is a visionary who will advance your health in every way. I’m excited to recommend her book to help you care for your precious heart—so that you can listen to it and offer all your gifts to our world.”
bestselling author of You Were Born Rich. - Bob Proctor
"Dr Cynthia Thaik is THE doctor to open your mind and your life to the way and the means to REAL health in every area of life. I recommend you not only read her book but that you take her "prescriptions" for better living. It may actually save your life!"
CEO, The Food Revolution Network, and co-author of Voices of the Food Revolution - Ocean Robbins
“If you want a healthy and happy heart, you’re going to LOVE Your Vibrant Heart! This book will guide you on the path to a more love-filled life!”
Co-Creator of Chicken Soup to Inspire the Body and Soul® - Jack Canfield
"This book is chocked full of vital, valuable information for living a long, healthy, vibrant life. It is literally a handbook for a healthy heart. It is easy to read and easy to apply. I highly recommend it."
author of Life Visioning - Michael Bernard Beckwith
"Dr. Cynthia Thaik’s medical and personal wisdom will enable all readers to achieve their maximum potential for health, longevity, and inner happiness. Read it and thrive!"
Ph.D., author of New York Times bestseller Minding the Body, Mending the Mind - Joan Borysenko
"In Your Vibrant Heart, Cynthia Thaik, M.D., shows how to integrate meditation, mindfulness, yoga, and self-awareness in a powerful program that brings forth inner peace, well-being, and health. Bravo, Dr. Cynthia!"
-Michael Bernard Beckwith

"Dr. Cynthia Thaik’s medical and personal wisdom will enable all readers to achieve their maximum potential for health, longevity, and inner happiness. Read it and thrive!"
    —Michael Bernard Beckwith, author of Life Visioning

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Meet the Author


   Dr. Cynthia Thaik is a Harvard-trained, board-certified cardiologist who specializes in women’s health, cardiovascular health, and congestive heart failure. She is the founder of Revitalize-U - A New Body Image, a wellness center focused on health, nutrition, weight loss, and detoxification.

   She has served as the co-director of the Women’s Cardiac Risk Screening Program at Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center and as the assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. Among her recognitions are the National Institute of Health’s National Research Service Award, the American College of Cardiology’s Cardiovascular Research Award, and the Raymond Kalil Memorial Cardiovascular Research Award.
 
   A practicing Buddhist, Dr. Cynthia believes in being centered and present in each moment.  Dr. Cynthia has helped thousands of patients take purposeful action to transform their health through the way they think, feel, and act. She lives in the Los Angeles area with her husband and three children.

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Your Vibrant Heart: Restoring Health, Strength, and Spirit from the Body's Core 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
rpv1 More than 1 year ago
This book by Dr. Cynthis Thaik is a fascinating read. I like books that intersect cross disciplines. I have read books on health, wellness, spirituality and running. Being a vegetarian all through and converted to vegan, I am always looking for solid books. This book falls into that category and the mind-body connection is very well established. I loved the introduction how the author got motivated to write this book. I like the way the book is woven. Talking about diseases with real world examples drives the point very clear. Liked the explanation on heart disease, obesity and other lifestyle based diseases and how to prevent them. Many of the chapters are delightful or (scary) to read. I applaud the author for making bold statements on type of food one should eat. Vegan food is awesome and is recommended! The author explains clearly organic vs non organic food. Fruits, veggies, juicing are all explained. I particularly liked the GMO discussion. I am amazed America is one of the few countries in the world which does not have GMO label. I feel we are all guinea pigs in the eyes of the food industry. So many countries have banned GMO or enforce label. Why is USA and Canada so backward in this regard. $$$$ in my opinion. I again applaud the doctor for her courage in bringing to light these issues. Liked the explanations on fitness, yoga and importance of exercise. The other subtler and powerful choices include meditation, controlled breathing are all wonderful. The quotes on the chapters are particularly inspiring. Overall I like the holistic approach the author has taken for getting a vibrant heart. There are many dimensions to a healthy lifestyle - knowing oneself, food, activity, knowing one's mind/soul, awareness, one's attitude, one's goal in life -- so many positive aspects. The author has touched so many of the aspects and created a very powerful positive experience and bound to delight readers. Great work!
Gina04 More than 1 year ago
Very informative and helped me pick up a few things to better my health.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
“Your Vibrant Heart” written by Dr. Cynthia Thaik was best summarized by Mary Morrissey who wrote in foreword that her book is “…a powerful prescription for more joyful living that blends poignant stories of love with practical information about the role that emotions and daily choices play in heart health..” Dr. Thaik managed to make an interesting and informative book about the heart that is the essence of what we are, providing a range of useful information about this vitally important human organ and tips on how to properly take care of your heart, in terms of nutrition, as well as achieving better mental and physical health. The author herself during her life and career has undergone major changes in the way she looks at heart problems and advices she is providing for their prevention and treatment; she gradually transformed from a Harvard-trained cardiologist who practiced exclusively modern and conventional Western medicine to a better-rounded physician with a holistic practice that incorporates mindfulness, Eastern philosophy, and the mind-body-soul connection into health, and into life as a whole. Dr. Thaik’s book is not too long, on about 300 pages divided into 10 chapters she discusses heart physiology, heart diseases, healthy nutrition and ways of food preparation that would be good for your heart, heart exercises, ways to improve cardiovascular health, tips how to revive your heart and reinvigorate your mind, and many other details related to our precious heart. “Your Vibrant Heart” is written in clear language without too much incomprehensible medical terms which makes it accessible even for the average reader. Therefore Dr. Cynthia Thaik’s work can be fully recommended to anyone interested in the prevention of heart diseases and healthy life, but also for those who have heart problems because using the tips in this book they can certainly make their life easier.
DominiqueDDG More than 1 year ago
The Vibrant Heart is about as holistic as it gets when considering overall care of the heart. It takes into account the standard issues based on the anatomy and physiology of the heart. Yes, it includes the routine discussion topics about diseases, cholesterol, stress, exercise and nutrition although not presented in the routine way. It also goes much beyond the normal discussions and incorporates the needs of the emotional heart, the spiritual heart, and an array of “alternative” ideas such as color therapy, meditation, laughter, creativity, music, reiki, visualization, acupuncture…the list of topics covered is extensive. There is something for every person to learn about and hopefully utilize to increase overall well-being. This book isn’t targeted for those suffering from heart disease. It is targeted for anyone with a beating heart. A solid resource to have for a lifetime of health centered on the heart. If this is not enough…the Forward of the book is written by Dr. Bernie Siegel (one of my heroes). Well written, inspiring, informative, practical & worth the investment.