BN.com Gift Guide

You're Fifty -- Now What? Investing for the Second Half of Your Life

Overview

Charles Schwab is one of America’s most trusted and respected names in financial services. In the bestselling You’re Fifty—Now What? Schwab offers you his advice and support on how to retire with the money you’ll need to have the kind of life you want. You’ll learn:

* The best investment strategies
* How to...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (59) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $1.99   
  • Used (53) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(1338)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0609808702 Fast Reliable Shipping From a trusted online seller!

Ships from: Cypress, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.47
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(6)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0609808702 New Unread Book may have some minor shelf wear. Fast Shipping, Excellent Customer Service, Satisfaction Guaranteed.

Ships from: Plantation, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$2.99
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(144)

Condition: New
Excellent condition. Interior is tight, bright and clean. Paperback cover has minor scuffing from shelf wear. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed. All items are carefully enclosed with ... bubble wrap. We ship promptly and worldwide via US Post and will email you a tracking number. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Emigrant, MT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.99
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(69)

Condition: New
2002 Trade paperback New. No dust jacket as issued. Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 336 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Lawrence, KS

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$9.74
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(936)

Condition: New
0609808702 *BRAND NEW* Ships Same Day or Next!

Ships from: Springfield, VA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(193)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
You're Fifty -- Now What?: Investing for the Second Half of Your Life

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Charles Schwab is one of America’s most trusted and respected names in financial services. In the bestselling You’re Fifty—Now What? Schwab offers you his advice and support on how to retire with the money you’ll need to have the kind of life you want. You’ll learn:

* The best investment strategies
* How to estimate how much you’ll need
* How to choose investments for the second half of your life
* The ins and outs of insurance and how to be adequately insured
* The fine art of estate planning
* The tools of charitable giving
* And much more

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“In You’re Fifty—Now What? author Charles R. Schwab focuses on real tasks that people nearing or already in retirement must tackle.” —Business Week
Robert Barker
In Your Fifty--Now What? author Charles Schwab focuses on real tasks that people nearing or already in retirement must tackle, such as creating a paycheck from savings. His rule of thumb: Start by taking no more than 4% to 5% of your savings each year. With helpful worksheets, glossary, and appendix, the book is digestible without being pabulum. Most of his advices is sound.
BusinessWeek
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Founder and chairman of a famous international brokerage, Schwab offers sound advice on basic personal finance topics faced by boomers and retirees, including estate planning, retirement cash flow and pension plans. The investing sections target inexperienced investors, with definitions of stocks and zero coupons, and worksheets for retirement budgets and portfolio benchmarks. A useful appendix includes advice on reading mutual fund prospectuses and selecting insurance. Schwab's breezy, non-threatening style and advertising backed by his company should ensure high visibility and bestseller list appearances. (Jan.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Finances, investments, and estate planning for aging baby boomers. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780609808702
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/2/2002
  • Edition description: FIRST PAPERBACK EDITION
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.05 (w) x 9.03 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

CHARLES R. SCHWAB is the founder, chairman, and co-CEO of The Charles Schwab Corporation, one of the nation’s largest financial services firms (www.schwab.com). He is a member of the board of trustees of Stanford University, where he earned his B.A. in economics and his M.B.A. from the Graduate School of Business. Author of the bestselling Charles Schwab’s Guide to Financial Independence, he is also the cofounder and chairman of the Schwab Foundation for Learning, a nonprofit agency providing support and guidance for parents of children with learning differences, as well as chairman of All Kinds of Minds Institute, a nonprofit institute dedicated to the understanding of differences in learning. He is the father of five children and lives with his wife, Helen, in the San Francisco Bay Area
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

I have a question for you, and it's simply this: How much is enough?

It's a tough question, and it's essentially the topic of just about every retirement book, article, or seminar. Everyone's trying to figure out how much they'll need, and all the experts are trying to tell you how to do it. So how much will you need? How much does it take? Will you have enough? How much is enough?

Chances are it's more than you think, thanks in part to some good news. We're living longer, for one thing. Today's 50-year-olds are a lot younger than the 50-year-olds of two generations ago. A lot of us will live to be 100. As a result, what we used to call retirement can last 30 or even 40 years. Not only that: we're healthier and therefore more active, so what we used to call our retirement years are a little more costly. And we have less help from the government -- Social Security isn't what it used to be. So while a lot of people think that if they have $300,000 or $400,000 set aside for retirement, they're set for life, they're probably wrong. True, that's a lot of money; chances are that it's a lot more than your parents had. But in reality, it may not be enough. So how much will it take to sustain the lifestyle you're picturing? There are some dangerous estimates out there. One number that's tossed around is 70%, meaning that in retirement you'll need 70% of your current income to live comfortably. That argument seems logical enough: a lot of costs will, after all, go down. If you're not working, you won't commute, you won't have to buy work clothes, and all those other work-related expenses will diminish.

But do the costs go down enough to justify a 30% reduction in income? I don't think so. A recent national news story mentioned a 58-year old computer programmer who, when he retired, had heard that 70% estimate, but just had a feeling that it wasn't reliable. Instead he decided that he would need 100% of his pre-retirement income. Yes, he realized, there were costs that would go down -- 401(k) contributions, Medicare and Social Security taxes, commuting and other work-related expenses, for example -- but he suspected that those savings would be more than offset by a whole laundry list of other expenses: medical care, travel and entertainment, eating out.

Many people have the same concerns. There are plenty of medical expenses for even healthy retirees, things that aren't covered by Medicare: prescription drugs, dental care, hearing aids, eye care. The house and car will still need maintenance, and it's common for retirees to find they can't or don't want to do as much of the work themselves, which means the added cost of hiring someone else to do work you used to do yourself. And a lot of retiring baby boomers are finding themselves part of the "sandwich generation." Retirement isn't their only financial concern; aging parents and the kids' college tuition? -- hings that used to be almost mutually exclusive -- are concerns as well.

To say that things have changed is putting it mildly, and retirement is at the top of that list. When all is said and done, a lot of people are finding that once they've looked carefully at the costs of retirement, the expenses are significant enough to warrant revising their master plan. They're thinking about working longer, or investing a little more each month. In short, if retirement has changed, then planning for retirement has to change as well. It's time to revise our assumptions and our plans. It's time for something new.

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I: Planning For The Financial Second Half Of Your Life
1: Investing Strategies for the Second Half ..... 7
2: Adding Up What You Have ..... 28
3: Estimating How Much You'll Need for the Second Half ..... 46
4: Choosing Investments for the Second Half ..... 84
5: Cash Flow in the Second Half Creating a Paycheck for Yourself ..... 127
6: Monitoring and Rebalancing Your Portfolio ..... 155
II: Putting Your Hourse In Order In The Second Half
7: Getting Help If and When You Need It ..... 187
8: The Assurance Called Insurance ..... 208
9: The Fine Art of Estate Planning ..... 226
10: Giving Something Back: Some Thoughts on Charitable Giving ..... 249
Epilogue ..... 265
Appendix ..... 267
Read More Show Less

Introduction

I have a question for you, and it's simply this: How much is enough? It's a tough question, and it's essentially the topic of just about every retirement book, article, or seminar. Everyone's trying to figure out how much they'll need, and all the experts are trying to tell you how to do it. So how much will you need? How much does it take? Will you have enough? How much is enough? Chances are it's more than you think, thanks in part to some good news. We're living longer, for one thing. Today's 50-year-olds are a lot younger than the 50-year-olds of two generations ago. A lot of us will live to be 100. As a result, what we used to call retirement can last 30 or even 40 years. Not only that: we're healthier and therefore more active, so what we used to call our retirement years are a little more costly. And we have less help from the government -- Social Security isn't what it used to be. So while a lot of people think that if they have $300,000 or $400,000 set aside for retirement, they're set for life, they're probably wrong. True, that's a lot of money; chances are that it's a lot more than your parents had. But in reality, it may not be enough. So how much will it take to sustain the lifestyle you're picturing? There are some dangerous estimates out there. One number that's tossed around is 70%, meaning that in retirement you'll need 70% of your current income to live comfortably. That argument seems logical enough: a lot of costs will, after all, go down. If you're not working, you won't commute, you won't have to buy work clothes, and all those other work-related expenses will diminish. But do the costs go down enough to justify a 30% reduction in income? I don't think so. A recent national news story mentioned a 58-year old computer programmer who, when he retired, had heard that 70% estimate, but just had a feeling that it wasn't reliable. Instead he decided that he would need 100% of his pre-retirement income. Yes, he realized, there were costs that would go down -- 401(k) contributions, Medicare and Social Security taxes, commuting and other work-related expenses, for example -- but he suspected that those savings would be more than offset by a whole laundry list of other expenses: medical care, travel and entertainment, eating out. Many people have the same concerns. There are plenty of medical expenses for even healthy retirees, things that aren't covered by Medicare: prescription drugs, dental care, hearing aids, eye care. The house and car will still need maintenance, and it's common for retirees to find they can't or don't want to do as much of the work themselves, which means the added cost of hiring someone else to do work you used to do yourself. And a lot of retiring baby boomers are finding themselves part of the "sandwich generation." Retirement isn't their only financial concern; aging parents and the kids' college tuition? -- hings that used to be almost mutually exclusive -- are concerns as well. To say that things have changed is putting it mildly, and retirement is at the top of that list. When all is said and done, a lot of people are finding that once they've looked carefully at the costs of retirement, the expenses are significant enough to warrant revising their master plan. They're thinking about working longer, or investing a little more each month. In short, if retirement has changed, then planning for retirement has to change as well. It's time to revise our assumptions and our plans. It's time for something new.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2001

    The Best Book on Financial Planning for the Over 46 Age Set

    My biggest complaint about most books on financial planning is that they try to cover everyone with one approach. Mr. Schwab's book is a pleasant exception to this rule. By at least focusing on those of around middle years (46 through 56), he can be more specific and make the information more relevant to each reader. Naturally, I would like to see future books be even more focused than this one, but Mr. Schwab has certainly moved in the right direction. I found this book to be vastly superior to '52 Weeks to Financial Fitness' by Marshall Loeb, which was also recently published, for people in this age category. Mr. Schwab's profits as author from this book are all being donated to the Charles Schwab Corporation Foundation to provide for the needs of seniors. The book is divided into two parts: First, planning for the rest of your life; and second, getting organized to implement that plan. The planning section is very well done because it covers materials at a level of perspective that goes from the needs of most beginners to handling the needs of all but the most sophisticated people. Fundamentals are covered in sidebars so as not to clutter-up the main text for those who do not need the information. The subjects covered include how much money you will need in total, determining the value of what you have available, estimating the gap between your needs and resources, understanding how to think about asset allocation in your investment funds, establishing the proper cash flow to match your needs, and readjusting your investment mix over time. Each section is clearly written and provides formats to make it easier for you to assemble and think about your information. I was particularly pleased to see Mr. Schwab challenge some conventional wisdom about financial planning. Many people use a rule of thumb that you will need 70% of your preretirement income. In practice, many people find that they spend more than that because some costs go up more rapidly than inflation, like medical care, or they take on new interests. Mr. Schwab suggests 90%. I think even that may not be conservative enough. I think a better assumption is to have the percentage grow over time, slowly. Eventually, it will probably exceed 100%. In addition, many people will tell you to plan on spending 6% of your assets each year after you have to start drawing on them. Mr. Schwab wisely suggests that 3-4% will be more appropriate for most people. I liked that advice very much. The advice on investing is much more conservative than you would expect from someone who heads an on-line brokerage house. But appropriately so. He suggests you stay in common stocks as long as possible, because you may well live much longer than you think. But he has all but 10% of your portfolio in either no-load index funds or conservative bond and cash positions. If you skip the idea of owning any individual stocks, the advice is quite appropriate for the average person. It also has you reducing your exposure to stocks over time, as the years appraoch when you will need the income. So even if stocks stop performing well (as some warn) in the next few years, you will be relatively safe. Part II of the book gets you into deciding whether you need a financial advisor or not, and how to select and work with one. It also looks at the most important questions about insurance, estate planning (get thee to a lawyer), and how to handle your donations so they bring you the most satisfaction and least after-tax cost. The book has several other nice qualities. It emphasizes the rest of your life as being the 'second half' rather than the downhill slide or some other negative concept. In sports, we all know that the winners are usually those who play the second half the best. Also, at half-time, the coach often makes adjustments that lead to winning performance. It is a very nice metaphor for financial planning at this stage in life. 'What do I want for the second

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2001

    Thinking Retirement? - A must read!

    I confess, I am over 50, and hadn't been doing a very good job of retirement planning. This book has helped me begin to change that. Clearly laid out prescriptions on what to do, and how to accomplish it. Thankfully, the book isn't one of those theorectical dissertations on finance, just straightforward, well researched, and plain talking advice on what can be done to enrich the years ahead. The book is a pretty quick read, and I've read it twice so far. Once straight through just gaining insight. Second time through committing pen to paper, getting a better picture on my retirement assets. I feel better about the future already, - I believe you will too. Enjoy!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)