You're Finally Here!

You're Finally Here!

by Mélanie Watt
     
 

Hooray! You're finally here! But where were you? A bunny bounces through a range of emotions in this funny picture book about how difficult it is to wait. At first he's ecstatic that you, the reader, has arrived. But then he can't help letting you know that waiting for you took too long, was way too boring, and even became insulting. The bunny is ready to forgive

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Overview

Hooray! You're finally here! But where were you? A bunny bounces through a range of emotions in this funny picture book about how difficult it is to wait. At first he's ecstatic that you, the reader, has arrived. But then he can't help letting you know that waiting for you took too long, was way too boring, and even became insulting. The bunny is ready to forgive everything if you will promise to stay. But hold on—he has to take a phone call. Wait! Come back !Where are you going? Underneath this book's silly, in-your-face humor are feelings true to every child who has had to wait for someone's attention.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The title is the accusation/declaration hurled by a mercurial bunny who's peeved that he's been made to wait for readers to show up. "Do you know how RUDE it is to make me wait?" demands the bunny of his audience, as Watt splits her page into four instructional frames. "As rude as talking with my mouth full... As rude as sticking gum under the sofa... As rude as running on carpet with muddy feet... As rude as making faces behind someone's back." (Perceptive readers will recognize that many of the bunny's similes feature common childhood transgressions.) But the bunny, vacillating between anger and apology, is hardly a paragon of polite behavior ("BUT SERIOUSLY, WHERE WERE YOU?" he screams, just one page after cheering readers with a cake, banner, pennant, and dance). And like the rest of the world, he can't resist taking a phone call ("Sure, I'm free to talk—they can wait"). Combining Watt's considerable gifts for metanarrative, social satire, outsize characters, and manic cartooning in one wonderfully silly tale, this is another keeper from a consistently funny talent. Ages 3–6. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Nicole Peterson Davis
Melanie Watt is back at it again. The newest of her clever picture books might become a classic. The book expresses emotions children feel when someone comes to visit who they have been waiting to see, while at the same time allows the adults to enjoy the irony and simplicity of the text. The book is about a rabbit who is extremely excited that you are finally here (you being the reader), but then he goes into some emotions about how sad and frustrated he was that he had to wait so long. Finally, he asks the reader to sign a contract that they will be together always—that is until the bunny gets a couple of phone calls from some friends. The illustrations are incredible, with warm colors and interesting character design. The text is witty and amusing. This is sure to be a favorite at home and at school for young children. Reviewer: Nicole Peterson Davis
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—A demanding bunny is livid. He's been waiting impatiently for readers to open his book. "Do you know how long I've been waiting in here?" "Do you know how annoying it is to have to wait?" "Where were you all this time???" He does think that children have good qualities, though. He likes that they are flealess and good, steady page-turners. Their arrival is celebrated with cake, music, and cartwheels. There is even a contract ready for them to sign, promising they'll stay forever. Before they can sign it, though, the bunny is interrupted. His cell phone rings. As his conversation with Vern leads into another with Aunt Beatrice, he forgets about his guests. The contract, which he was just holding, is now on the floor. As readers turn to the last page, the bunny is puzzled by his friends' departure. He wonders where they're going. "Was it something I said? Seriously, is there a number where I can reach you?" Full-page cartoon art often faces four framed illustrations, giving the bunny's examples of how unfair and boring and rude it is to be kept waiting. Children will delight in being part of this amusing story and enjoy seeing the tables turned as the bunny exhibits rude and unacceptable behavior. The stylized figure has a large oval head and round eyes, and the endpapers are embellished with a carrot design.—Tanya Boudreau, Cold Lake Public Library, AB, Canada
Pamela Paul
…brings to mind the "Pigeon" series by Mo Willems in both tone and look.
—The New York Times

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423134862
Publisher:
Hyperion Books for Children
Publication date:
03/08/2011
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.02(w) x 10.16(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
AD390L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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