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You're Hired: How to Succeed in Business and Life from the Winner of The Apprentice

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Overview

*Author will be named after the final show is aired in Australia*

The winner of the hit TV show, The Apprentice, shows how anyone can become their own personal success in both business and life, using his or her  own experiences as a self-made entrepreneur, his or her work ethic, top business strategies, and lessons learned competing on the show, working for Donald Trump and winning the most talked about reality shows in ...

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You're Hired: How to Succeed in Business and Life from the Winner of The Apprentice

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Overview

*Author will be named after the final show is aired in Australia*

The winner of the hit TV show, The Apprentice, shows how anyone can become their own personal success in both business and life, using his or her  own experiences as a self-made entrepreneur, his or her work ethic, top business strategies, and lessons learned competing on the show, working for Donald Trump and winning the most talked about reality shows in years.

Foreword by Donald Trump.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The two words of the title ended the most rigorous and widely watched job search in history, Donald Trump's marathon search for an executive hire on The Apprentice. The successful applicant was Bill Rancic, a 32-year-old entrepreneur from Chicago. You're Hired, his first book, isn't a tell-all about the show or a guide to winning reality shows; it's the story of Rancic's personal success and the methods he used to achieve it. In this brisk read, he describes how he launched a business with no major start-up capital and turned it into a multimillion-dollar enterprise.
Publishers Weekly
The author won on the reality TV show The Apprentice, in which Donald Trump (who provides a foreword) slowly eliminates potential personal assistants until one is left standing. Rancic puts down, in tumbling first-person prose, the strategy he used to win, as well as how, back in 1995, he co-founded and ran a small mail-order company, Cigars Around the World. Rancic never went to business school, and his book might be boiled down to "rely on your observations and common sense, and on your close relationships." Nearly every chapter is loaded with advice gleaned from family members or friends with whom he has collaborated, salted with a smattering of approaches Rancic picked up from his own reading of how-tos and from his work life. The result sets the book apart: Rancic takes work seriously, and everything in the book is something he personally has tried out; his successes and travails (including a fire at his company) come through clearly and conversationally, as from a big brother. The last two of seven chapters cover his time on the show with "Mr. Trump" and offer candid takes on the other contestants and the show's productions. For a loquacious "how-I-did-it," Rancic's book debut is surprisingly satisfying. (Sept.) Forecast: A nine-city author tour and 25-city radio tour should build on name recognition from The Apprentice and put up numbers more than befitting a tyro. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060765415
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/31/2004
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 782,050
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.77 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill Rancic is a successful entrepreneur who currently works for the Trump Organization.

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Table of Contents

Letter from Donald Trump viii
Introduction: Why We're Here 1
1 The Spirit of Enterprise 9
Lessons Learned: On Goals 20
2 Getting Started 23
Lessons Learned: On Values 42
3 The Price Is Right 47
Lessons Learned: On Strategy 62
4 Business as Usual 65
Lessons Learned: On Leadership 98
5 Business as Unusual 105
Lessons Learned: On Vision 134
6 Playing the Game 143
Lessons Learned: On Execution 174
7 Putting It All Together 181
Lessons Learned: On Success 196
Acknowledgments 199
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First Chapter

You're Hired
How to Succeed in Business and Life from the Winner of The Apprentice

Chapter One

The Spirit of Enterprise

The world is a business, Mr. Beale.
It has been since man crawled out of the slime.
-- Paddy Chayefsky, Network

Ask any successful person to look back over the events of his or her life, and chances are there'll be a turning point of one kind or another. It doesn't matter if that success has come on a ball field or in a boardroom, in a research laboratory or on a campaign trail -- it can usually be traced to some pivotal moment. A lightbulb over the head. A rude awakening. An unexpected turn.

Here's mine, and I set it here at the outset because it has informed every decision I've made since. I was a couple of months out of college, and a couple of months into my first career-oriented job. I'd waxed boats and rehabbed cars and worked all kinds of hustles as a student looking to pocket some cash (more on these efforts in just a few pages), but this was my first hitch in a real-world job, working for a big corporation in anything like a big way. I'd hired on with a commodity metals company as an outside salesman, which was actually an interesting career move considering I knew about as much about commodity metals as I knew about fertilizer or waste management or industrial bathroom supplies. That is, I knew crap. I even said as much when I went in for my interview, but the guy doing the hiring didn't seem to care. He liked that I was honest and young, and he liked how I came across.

From my perspective, there wasn't much to like about the job beyond the paycheck and the chance to try out a variety of sales strategies that would serve me well later, but I was coming to realize that a decent paycheck can make up for a whole lot. Ever since my graduation in May, I'd been holding out for a dream job at a dream salary, and it took me until August to realize that these dreams were pretty much a fantasy and I'd better grab what I could. One by one, all of my college buddies had taken these nothing-special entry-level jobs, pushing papers for $18,000 or $21,000 a year (and hating the work besides), and I'd turn up my nose and tell them I wasn't about to get out of bed for anything less than $50,000. That was my line, my attitude. I'd gotten used to earning good money in my summer jobs, working with my hands, calling my own shots, making my own hours and collecting full value on the back of my full effort, and I simply couldn't see the point in busting my butt for a salary only slightly better than minimum wage. I was full of myself and thought my time was worth more than that. (And in truth it was, even though I was probably too young and arrogant to realize it.)

Anyway, my friends joined the workforce and left me hanging, to where I started to think maybe they were onto something. Maybe I'd missed a meeting or a memo telling me to get on board before the world passed me by. As a practical matter, it wasn't as much fun hanging out by myself all day while my buddies went to work, and I kept thinking maybe they knew something I didn't. At some point in all this uncertainty, I finally realized that I should just shut up and get out of bed and get to work, telling myself that if I didn't like the first job I found, I could always find another.

It was around this time that the commodity metals gig turned up and I went for it. Like I said, I didn't know the first thing about metals. Hell, I didn't know the second thing, either, but I was a quick study. I told the guy with some confidence that I could sell anything, and I honestly believed that I could.

The job didn't quite pay $50,000, but if I succeeded, it would get me close. I had a company car at my disposal, an expense account, and a guaranteed salary of $30,000, plus commissions. Really, it was cush, and with any luck I figured I could push my take well over my $50,000 target. It was all I could do to keep from calling my buddies and telling them how smart I was for holding out.

One of the most interesting things about the job was that I was the youngest guy on the sales force. By about ten to fifteen years. All of the other salesmen were in their forties, and there I was, all of twenty-three, playing in the big leagues. These guys had kids and mortgages and car payments. Me, I was living with my parents, same house I'd grown up in, and all I was worried about was pizza and walking- around money, so the stakes were entirely different. To them, it was everything; to me, it was just an okay gig, a place to start.

There was a lot to learn. I'd sold myself as a salesman, but in truth I had no idea how to sell. I learned by watching, by listening to the sales pitches that worked and the ones that didn't, by modeling my demeanor on some of the more successful salesmen we had in the field. The good ones displayed a quiet confidence. They were never desperate to make a sale, which I eventually learned was because desperation never closed any deal. Their confidence came from knowing they had a good product at a good price, and because the deals they were offering were profitable all around. It's a lot easier to sell when you can stand behind your product or service and know you've got the goods ...

You're Hired
How to Succeed in Business and Life from the Winner of The Apprentice
. Copyright © by Bill Rancic. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 29, 2011

    Check what else Bill Rancic has to tell you about business

    Nice guy.
    He's honest, hard working and he has an eye for an opportunity.
    There's our first lesson for living the good life.
    Play life straight.
    Put in the effort.
    Look for ideas and opportunities (as I did when I wrote this review).
    Check Google for code b004va3hsw + Brian Morris and you'll discover what else Bill Rancic has to share in the ideas department.
    Mr NIKE was right. "Just do it." Great slogan.
    Brian Morris, ebook author. ebookofKnowledge

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2004

    Fun and Interesting

    Highly recommended for anyone who followed the Apprentice (first season). If you were a fan of Bill, you will be an even bigger fan after reading his story and pondering his advice. It is an inspiring story about drive and determination.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2004

    Anyone can do it!

    After watching The Apprentice, I coudln't wait to pick up Bill's book. It is very motivational as he tells how he's achieved success from street smarts & energy. This is a must read for anyone who is wanting to start their own business or is about to enter the business world. Bill's advice shows that anyone can be successful & it can be applied to any type of business or situation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2004

    Interesting & Instructive. Elements of Bio & Self-Help

    Having never seen a single episode of the Apprentice, I was nonetheless drawn to read this book. It is quite a story. A young man who uses his instinct and experience-based know-how to succeed in business and life and on the Apprentice show. He triumphs over the Ivy League prepared, in a manner that highlights the essential importance of common sense and honesty and integrity. Lessons learned are woven within the author's story of buring cars low and selling them high in high school; starting a boat wash and wax service in college years; and starting a mail-order Cigar business after college. Fun and informative reading. Even though I did not watch the apprentice, I enjoyed reading about his experience on that show and how he won it. A fun book from an inpirational young man who speaks with honesty. Highly recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2004

    It was lacking...

    Not a terrible book. I would recommend it if you were a big fan of The Apprentice. Don't expect to get inspired or to find some great business advice that isn't already common sense.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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